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NEWS
November 14, 2003
AH, THE COTS paraded through the Capitol, the exhaustion-cracked voices, the Mr. Smith Goes to Washington self-righteousness. It was the Republicans' all-nighter protest of Democrats blocking judicial nominees; it might have been more credible, though, if they forced Democrats to do the talking. When senators want to break a filibuster, they make the filibusterers talk till they drop. That's what happened to Jimmy Stewart in the movie, a copy of which was carried around for inspiration by an aide to Senate Majority Leader Bill Frist.
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NEWS
By James Burdick | January 22, 2013
Doctors are breathing a collective sigh of relief because we again escaped a cut in Medicare payments. But this whole recurrent charade underscores, once again, the unresolved issue of how to pay doctors. The fiscal cliff rescue included the usual "doc fix" - an override of the 27 percent Medicare reimbursement cut required by the Sustainable Growth Rate (SGR) law this year. That law has dictated annual cuts in Medicare reimbursement, which have been overridden by Congress annually. Nevertheless, this escape only postponed the crisis for older patients for another year.
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NEWS
March 21, 1995
Don't be fooled by the efforts of state Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller Jr. and Sen. Clarence Blount of Baltimore City to craft so-called reform of Maryland's legislative scholarship program. It now appears that Messrs. Miller and Blount have been engaged in a scheme that they intend to fob off as earnest reform but actually is a cynical charade designed to keep the program going in its current form for many more years.Funded this year by $8.5 million in taxpayer dollars and prone in the past to abuses by the legislators who personally award the grants, the scholarship program finally became such an embarrassment that the House of Delegates has voted repeatedly in recent years to surrender its share of the pot to the State Scholarship Administration.
NEWS
Dan Rodricks | June 23, 2012
I'll tell you what annoys me: the supermarket that sells fresh salmon by the piece instead of by the pound. I uncovered this deception recently. The sign in the seafood case at my favorite supermarket said, "Salmon $4.49," and, of course, I assumed that was by the pound, because salmon has been sold that way ever since the Yupiks brought the first chinook to Fairbanks for sale to the Lower 48. But turns out, the salmon was being sold by the 6-ounce piece. That means three pieces of salmon, or 18 ounces, cost $13.47.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 25, 2002
SUN SCORE ***1/2 The Truth About Charlie updates the classic Audrey Hepburn-Cary Grant caper Charade, about a beautiful widow in Paris stalked for a fortune she never knew about, with the freedom and euphoria of a moviemaking team on a creative spree. With incandescent Thandie Newton as the heroine, stalwart Mark Wahlberg as the enigmatic American who comes to her aid, and slippery Tim Robbins as an officious helpmate from the American Embassy, director Jonathan Demme treats the premise as a great big snowball that he can roll merrily down a fresh new slope.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | October 3, 1994
You may not approve the invasion but it turns out the Haitia people really hate the thugs and want Aristide.Could the Disney Company do for Maryland what it has done for, uh, France?Senator Hollings of South Carolina is shooting down free trade and John C. Calhoun is spinning in his grave.Quit the charade. Pete Angelos will manage the club.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | October 30, 1992
Appropriately enough, when the family plays a game in Splitting Image Theatre Company's production of "Family Masks," the game is charades. It's an ideal choice for this dysfunctional family of six, whose members are often at a loss for the words to express their feelings and are almost always living a charade.It's also a typical example of the impeccable details in this collaborative movement-theater piece, which premiered at Loyola College in 1989 and is now receiving a fresh and partially revamped airing as the first production in the Theatre Project's new program of residencies for local alternative theater companies.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | January 30, 2006
BOSTON -- Now that it's all over but the accusations, let's take a minute to check the reviews. The performance, no, excuse me, the confirmation hearings of Judge Samuel Alito Jr., were most often described by political drama critics as a "charade" or a bit of "Kabuki" theater. Charade is, of course, a "pointless act," emphasis on the act. But charade is also a game played in pantomime, and these hearings were anything but silent. Someday we may label them "talkings" instead of "hearings."
FEATURES
By David Bianculli and David Bianculli,Special to The Sun | September 19, 1994
The second inning of "Baseball" is tops on the list tonight -- which means a VCR would come in real handy, because the premiere of "ER" and the season premiere of "Northern Exposure" run directly opposite.* "Baseball" (8-10 p.m., Channel 22) -- Two words: Ty Cobb. That's what tonight's inning of "Baseball" presents, covering 1900-1910. You'll also get to see the Paul Bunyanesque hands of Honus Wagner, the positive role model credo of Christy Mathewson, and the origins of "Take Me Out to the Ball Game," a song you'll hear -- and hear, and hear -- over the next seven nights of "Baseball."
SPORTS
July 9, 2005
O's must not copy Yankees and Red Sox I am tired of hearing quote after quote from each Oriole falsely reassuring each Orioles fan that this team will soon turn things around. That is a disservice to this great city and loyal fan base. It is about time that this franchise admits its wrongdoings. The Orioles have been stuck in an identity crisis. Like the kid who just joined a new school, the Orioles have been trying to emulate the Yankees and the Red Sox, matching power for power. From Albert Belle to Sammy Sosa, the Orioles have tried to borrow someone else's recipe for success.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | April 26, 2012
The learning curve for Chelsea Clinton, special correspondent, continues to bend in the wrong direction. Clinton's Wednesday night report on chain restaurants that donate leftover food to charity was slightly better than her previous efforts. But only because the producers used every trick in the book to give us less Chelsea and more of anything they could find to distract us from her. Less was marginally more. One of the most striking aspects of the report was how similar its opening was to the first report she did for "Rock Center" a few months ago. Her debut opened with needy children in an after-school setting getting a free meal, and so did Wednesday's.  But in the first report, the producers gave us lots of Chelsea.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | February 16, 2012
Chelsea Clinton did her second report for NBC's "Rock Center with Brian Williams" Wednesday night, and it was just as flawed as the first. The learning curve does not appear to have bent one degree in the direction of growth. This one-dimensional, under-reported, naive celebration of a charter school in Rhode Island was just as much of an empty-headed puff job as Clinton's first report on an after-school program in Little Rock. And before you take to your computer to send an email telling me how mean it is for me to criticize this 31-year-old woman who has been given educational and workplace advantages generally belonging to the elite 1 percent we have been hearing so much about in recent months, let me say my criticism is not primarily directed at Clinton, but rather at NBC News, It knows the difference between jounalism and the silly crap she is doing.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler | August 29, 2011
Is it just me, or was there actually a time when ethanol was the great, green hope? Didn't Al Gore tell us it would fight global warming through cleaner motor vehicle emissions? Didn't George W. Bush promise this homegrown grain byproduct would reduce U.S. dependence on expensive foreign oil? And even though they had grave misgivings, didn't the folks at the tri-state Chesapeake Bay Commission conclude they had to embrace this political reality and make the best of it? I may have been the only dope who fell for any of this, but the U.S. Senate has set me straight.
NEWS
March 22, 2010
A proposal in the Baltimore City Council to help clean up the environment by limiting the use of plastic bags in shops and stores is a perfect example of a law so compromised by the demands of competing special interests that it ends up accomplishing nothing. The plan endorsed Tuesday by a City Council panel started out honestly enough. Three years ago, the council began considering proposals to deal with the mounting problem of plastic and paper bag waste accumulating on city streets.
SPORTS
By KEVIN VAN VALKENBURG | June 28, 2008
For the first time in NBA history, three freshmen were taken with the first three picks of the draft Thursday night. If Derrick Rose, Michael Beasley and O.J. Mayo turn into All-Stars, it will be a memorable day for the league. And it will be yet another sad day to look back on for the NCAA. Rose, Beasley and Mayo should have been in the NBA a year ago. But the league's new age restrictions forced them to spend a year on a college campus, biding their time until they could become eligible for the draft.
NEWS
By ELLEN GOODMAN | January 30, 2006
BOSTON -- Now that it's all over but the accusations, let's take a minute to check the reviews. The performance, no, excuse me, the confirmation hearings of Judge Samuel Alito Jr., were most often described by political drama critics as a "charade" or a bit of "Kabuki" theater. Charade is, of course, a "pointless act," emphasis on the act. But charade is also a game played in pantomime, and these hearings were anything but silent. Someday we may label them "talkings" instead of "hearings."
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | November 22, 2002
Few actors could be as effortlessly dominant as the late James Coburn, the subject of a three-film tribute airing Sunday night on Turner Classic Movies. And nowhere was that talent better displayed than in the film that brought him his first taste of big-screen fame. Coburn, who died at age 74 Monday after suffering a heart attack at his Beverly Hills home, earned his acting stripes on television, appearing in dozens of dramas (often aired live) during the 1950s. But it was in John Sturges' 1960 Western, The Magnificent Seven (7:30 p.m.)
NEWS
By STEVE CHAPMAN | January 11, 2006
CHICAGO -- President Bush's nomination of Samuel A. Alito Jr. to the U.S. Supreme Court was supposed to set off a war. After the smooth, smiling, bulletproof John G. Roberts Jr., Judge Alito looked like a fat target for Democrats. A sitting judge with a long paper trail, he had the reputation of being as conservative as Justice Antonin Scalia -- and he would replace a moderate, Sandra Day O'Connor. Interest groups on both sides were primed for all-out combat. But two months later, the looming war looks more like a paintball contest: a choreographed romp that may leave the antagonists a bit spattered but will spill no blood.
SPORTS
July 9, 2005
O's must not copy Yankees and Red Sox I am tired of hearing quote after quote from each Oriole falsely reassuring each Orioles fan that this team will soon turn things around. That is a disservice to this great city and loyal fan base. It is about time that this franchise admits its wrongdoings. The Orioles have been stuck in an identity crisis. Like the kid who just joined a new school, the Orioles have been trying to emulate the Yankees and the Red Sox, matching power for power. From Albert Belle to Sammy Sosa, the Orioles have tried to borrow someone else's recipe for success.
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