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By Mary Johnson and Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 31, 2010
Could a production titled "Daddy's Girl" by a little-known playwright from Kansas offer rewarding theater? Gary Ray Stapp, who wrote his first play in 2003, sets this story - staged by Bowie Community Theater - in an eatery called Maudie's Diner and fills it with masterful one-liners and amusingly quirky characters. "Daddy's Girl" follows 25-year widower and diner proprietor Benard Muloovy as he tries to identify his long-lost daughter. A portrait of Benard's wife, Maudie, hangs on the diner wall, talking to him and enlisting the help of an angel to reunite her husband with their child Elizabeth.
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NEWS
By Evan Siple For The Baltimore Sun | October 8, 2014
Legends of the Fog 500 Carsins Run Road, Aberdeen Years open: 8 Open: Fridays through Sundays through Nov. 1 (and Oct. 30); tickets from $25; legendsofthefog.com. First impressions: Legends of the Fog stops just shy of being a full-blown festival-style amusement park situated in the middle of a massive corn field. With an entry area featuring horror-ific midway games like "Zombie Ball" and a "Coffin Ride," alongside a fire pit for warmth/teenage makeout sessions and food trucks for pre-terror sustenance, the atmosphere is pretty family friendly.
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NEWS
By Gwendolyn Glenn | May 22, 2014
Intense, dark and brutally thought-provoking is how C Street's Venus Theatre's newest production, Light of Night, can be described. Although written four years ago, the gripping but yet sensitive and hopeful play by New York playwright Cecilia Copeland reflects events in the news today. In watching Light of Night, it had the feeling of an episode of the CBS hit series "Criminal Minds. " The play has all of the elements. There is a crime committed and the minds of the perpetrator and victim are delved into to the point of being a bit uncomfortable at times.
NEWS
By Richard E. Vatz | October 3, 2014
The presidential election of 2012 and Maryland's gubernatorial election of 2014 have much in common rhetorically in terms of their approaches to issues and spin, the two key components of political persuasion. The 2012 presidential election pitted a likable African-American Democratic incumbent president against a white, older Republican who had been out of politics for years. The 2014 Maryland gubernatorial race features a likable incumbent African-American Democratic lieutenant governor against a white, older Republican who has been out of politics for years.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck | November 2, 2000
One actress, five characters Theatre Project's season gets under way tomorrow with the world premiere of "Pandora's Box," a one-woman show about the interwoven lives of five diverse women. The tale of everyday heroism stars Kate Redway as: a 12-year-old girl coping with her father's death, a 30-something dominatrix, a 91-year-old Jewish widow, a lesbian construction worker and the white mother of four adopted black children. Produced by the New Jersey-based RPM Productions, "Pandora's Box" is written by Daria Finn, a construction-worker-turned-playwright.
ENTERTAINMENT
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,david.zurawik@baltsun.com | April 12, 2009
Last week, the producers of the Fox medical drama House pulled off one of the more difficult tricks in TV these days: They cut through the clutter of a not-so-terrific year for prime-time scripted series and caused a major stir with the out-of-the-blue suicide of a character, Dr. Lawrence Kutner (Kal Penn). The shocking gunshot wound to the head of this make-believe character gave birth to a host of real-life questions as to how we relate to TV, how the networks sometimes exploit our devotion to beloved characters, and how new media, like Facebook and Twitter, are making fictional characters more a part of our everyday lives than ever.
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,Theater Critic | August 7, 1992
In yesterday's Maryland Live section, one of the actresses was misidentified in the photograph accompanying the review of the Avalon Theater Company's production of "A Very Fine House." The correct identification is Michelle Bar-av (on left) and Marge Goering.The Sun regrets the errors.When Crosby, Stills & Nash recorded "Our House," group living meant communes, tofu and free love. In Carol Weinberg's "A Very Fine House," which takes its name from that song, group living means a retirement home, pitted prunes and Social Security.
FEATURES
By Dan Rodricks and Dan Rodricks,Sun Staff Writer | March 20, 1994
Even back then, when he was still creating with words the enchanted Broadway that would become internationally celebrated through Frank Loesser's beloved musical, "Guys and Dolls," Damon Runyon was himself perplexed, and maybe a little off-put, by all the fuss about "Runyonesque characters" and the question, posed by interlopers, of what made one. He wrote about this sometime, as best I can tell, in the early 1940s."
NEWS
By Nancy Erickson and Nancy Erickson,special to the sun | March 9, 2007
Jungle plants extend off the stage, reaching toward the audience. An African drum beat sounds, and a story of the beginning of the world begins, "My Best Beloved." Armed with creativity and charm, Glenelg Country School last week pulled the audience into the magical African world of Just So. Based on Rudyard Kipling's "Just So Stories," the performance combines Kipling's stories in one musical. In the beginning of the world, the Eldest Magician created all the animals, only to realize that they are all the same.
NEWS
By Stephen Bailey | July 14, 1991
Ever since Edgar Allan Poe invented the genre, there have been three areas of concern in mysteries: plotting, character development and environment. Some writers -- Agatha Christie jumps to mind -- enjoy immense success with plotting alone.Add character development to strong plotting and you get P. D. James. Dick Francis has found a winning formula pushing wooden characters through fascinating plots in wonderfully detailed environments. All three elements -- a strong plot, and strong characters living in a fully realized world -- are found only in the works of mystery's masters: the American icon Raymond Chandler, the underappreciated Australian Arthur W. Upfield, the prolific Belgian Georges Simenon.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and The Baltimore Sun | September 29, 2014
Cereal makers have long designed eye-catching boxes to lure children to supermarket breakfast aisles. Now, grocers and produce companies are turning to Big Bird and other "Sesame Street" characters in an effort to make fruits and vegetables just as appealing. An emerging national movement that uses the Muppets to market vegetables to preschoolers got a foothold in Baltimore last week when it was adopted by two area businesses — Mars Super Markets and Savage-based East Coast Fresh, a Mars vendor and processor of fresh-cut fruits and vegetables.
NEWS
By Martin O'Malley | September 11, 2014
Two-hundred years ago, a Maryland-born lawyer watched as British forces bombarded Fort McHenry at the Battle of Baltimore. At dawn, against all odds, the massive star-spangled banner flew over the fort, signaling America's triumphant defense of Baltimore. As the flag waved, Francis Scott Key penned the words that would become our National Anthem. This week, as we celebrate the bicentennial anniversary of the defense of Fort McHenry and our National Anthem, we celebrate more than Maryland's special sacrifice in the defense of American independence that September dawn.
NEWS
By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun and By Wesley Case, The Baltimore Sun | September 9, 2014
At the Towson University football team's home opener late last month, the loudest cheers arguably came for the smallest athlete on the field. With the current Towson gymnastics team by her side, 24-year-old alumna Kacy Catanzaro stood in the endzone and waved to the roughly 8,000 fans in attendance. "Let's go, Kacy! Let's go, Kacy!" the student section began to chant as Catanzaro — dressed in a black top, denim shorts and boots pulled up to her knees — flashed her megawatt smile.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 22, 2014
Tana Hicken, a Baltimore actress and teacher who deftly portrayed a wide variety of characters on stage during a professional career that spanned more than four decades, died Aug. 17 at her home in Sparks of myositis, an autoimmune disorder. She was 70. "I think she was the finest stage actress I've ever witnessed in my life. She was just riveting," said Vince Lancisi, founder of Everyman Theatre , who first saw Ms. Hicken at Washington's Arena Stage when he was a student at the Catholic University of America.
NEWS
By Michael Hill | August 12, 2014
They were called "round-robins" - a way of dividing up the stars of the new television season and the hundred or so critics who had come to Los Angeles to interview them. Instead of one unwieldy gathering, the critics divided into three groups and the stars rotated through. Maybe stars isn't the right word. These were actors on shows that had yet to air who hoped to become stars. The year was 1978, and I was the new TV critic for The Evening Sun on my first West Coast network tour, a biannual event.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | August 2, 2014
It is not often that a piece of Maryland architectural history goes on the market, which is one of myriad reasons that the Springfield Estate (also known as Peerce's Plantation) in northern Baltimore County is such a treasure. At a selling price of $1.975 million, this circa-1800 homestead was accurately restored and renovated by a previous owner.  "The original block of the house is a classic and true Federal period residence," said Nancy Hubble, the listing agent with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage.
NEWS
By KATHY SUTPHIN | May 19, 1995
A cast of colorful papier-mache creations made by local middle school students are introducing young patrons to popular storybook characters at Mount Airy Branch Library.From Eric Carle's hungry little caterpillar to Dr. Seuss' cat in a red and white hat, members of the Mount Airy Middle School's eighth-grade Palette Club used paper, paste, paint and plentiful portions of imagination to make 14 child-pleasing figures.The middle school artists, accompanied by art teacher and club adviser Elizabeth Fabritius, presented the marvelous menagerie to the Children's Department of the library after school May 12.The characters represent nearly a school year's worth of work by club members, who began their individual projects with sketches of favorite book characters.
FEATURES
By Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel | February 4, 1993
"Hearts Afire" is within weeks of creating a TV variation on the old shotgun wedding.On Feb. 22, the characters played by John Ritter and Markie Post will be married on the first-year, Monday-night CBS sitcom. This will legitimize a romance that quickly has become one of the hottest on TV.From opening night in September, the characters played by Mr. Ritter and Ms. Post -- John Hartman and Georgie Ann Lahti -- have been unable to keep their hands off each other. The pilot episode concluded with the two -- he's a divorcee with two kids; she has never been married -- embracing in a hot tub.Since then, the couple -- both aides to a conservative Southern senator -- have been amorous in their Washington office, in a car and just about anywhere else they could create some privacy.
SPORTS
By Ryan Bacic and The Baltimore Sun | June 20, 2014
Amid the old Terps jerseys and the "Daddy's Girls" picture frame and the College Cup posters in Sasho Cirovski's office sit the Maryland soccer coach's two bookcases. They're packed, he says, with "every coaching book you can imagine. " One book in particular stands out: the autobiography of Manchester United's Sir Alex Ferguson, who before his 2013 retirement won 13 English Premier League titles, 19 domestic cups and two Champions League crowns. He is, in short, probably soccer's most successful manager of all time - and by far its most legendary.
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