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Character Education

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By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2008
Laurie Namey and Patricia "Brigid" Carmichael have about 40 years experience in education between them. Their experience in education has taught them that there is a lot more to educating a child than academics. For starters, children need character education, Namey said. "Character education is a necessity in our ever-changing, diverse community," said Namey, who is in her first year as assistant principal at Edgewood Middle School. "Schools need to make character education important."
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NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | February 4, 2009
Standing in a locker room at Baltimore County's Kenwood High School, the teenage girl kept her cool when one of her peers passed by and hit her with a book bag. "Under normal circumstances, that would have been a major fight in our building," said teacher Nancy Hanlin, recounting the incident. Instead, Hanlin said, the girl told her classmate that she would have hit back "if I wasn't working on my virtues." The fight that wasn't illustrates the changes that school officials say they are seeing at Kenwood, where a new character education initiative called the Virtues Project has begun altering the way teachers, administrators and students communicate with one another.
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NEWS
By Cal Thomas | March 29, 2001
PRESIDENT BUSH wants to spend millions of dollars on "character" education in government-run schools. My parents gave me mine for free. California, where the latest two school shootings took place, spends more than $40 billion annually on grades K-12 alone, according to the Pacific Research Institute for Public Policy. "Proposition 98 requires that (education) receive 40 percent of the state's budget, more than any other item," the institute notes on its Web site. California taxpayers have a right to question whether they are getting their money's worth.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,Special to The Baltimore Sun | December 14, 2008
Laurie Namey and Patricia "Brigid" Carmichael have about 40 years experience in education between them. Their experience in education has taught them that there is a lot more to educating a child than academics. For starters, children need character education, Namey said. "Character education is a necessity in our ever-changing, diverse community," said Namey, who is in her first year as assistant principal at Edgewood Middle School. "Schools need to make character education important."
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2002
Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend's first significant campaign initiative will build on something she's been pushing for almost two decades -- community service and character education. Starting this week, Townsend will lay out plans for every public school in Maryland to create substantive, "high-quality" programs to teach -- and have students practice -- such character traits as respect, responsibility, caring and kindness. "Originally, the whole purpose of public schools was to teach democratic values: to teach honor and responsibility and respect," said Townsend, the leading Democratic nominee for governor.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN STAFF | July 7, 1999
It sounds like "Mister Rogers' Neighborhood."Carroll County students will return to class this fall to a program that could, on its face, make high-schoolers want to gag: Each month, they will "celebrate" a character trait. First comes respect. Then responsibility and trustworthiness. Then cooperation, and kindness, and courtesy, and so on.But don't cringe yet.Where "character education" is afoot -- in Baltimore, across much of Maryland and around the country -- such seemingly saccharine programs, intended to teach children basic values and ethics, are winning accolades.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2000
Despite receiving a national character education award yesterday, students and faculty at South Carroll High School aren't celebrating. "We announced it to the students and congratulated them because this award is theirs. But we've tried not to make too big a deal of it because it's the behavior we expect and the behavior we feel the students expect for themselves," Assistant Principal John Seaman said. "We shouldn't get too excited about doing the right thing, but at the same time, it's nice to have it recognized by someone else."
NEWS
By Laura Cadiz and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2002
Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend stopped by Hollifield Station Elementary School yesterday and got a lesson in leadership from a group of pupils who have made a careful study of the concept. "You can't be a good leader and be boring," said 10-year-old Brandon Earle, who is in fifth grade. Later, Brandon confided to Townsend: "I thought you'd be boring, but when I heard you had four children, I was like, OK." Hollifield Station, in Ellicott City, has been named Maryland Character Education School of the Year for 2001-2002 by the Maryland Center for Character Education.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | October 20, 2000
Despite receiving a national character education award yesterday, students and faculty at South Carroll High School aren't celebrating. "We announced it to the students and congratulated them because this award is theirs. But we've tried not to make too big a deal of it because it's the behavior we expect and the behavior we feel the students expect for themselves," Assistant Principal John Seaman said. "We shouldn't get too excited about doing the right thing, but at the same time, it's nice to have it recognized by someone else."
NEWS
By Mike Burns | July 11, 1999
CHARACTER EDUCATION sounds like a great idea. The wonder is that Carroll County and other school systems across the country have not been teaching this subject in recent years. Or is it just a new name and bureaucratic requirement for something that's always been a part of public education?All of us want our children to learn the lessons of high moral character and courtesy. So why is the move to install character education in the Carroll schools this fall such a big deal?Perhaps it's because the new program seems so formalized.
NEWS
July 23, 2006
Board of Education holds work session The Carroll County Board of Education will hold an administrative meeting at 1 p.m. Wednesday in Room 007 of the board offices in Westminster. A work session will be held at 2 p.m. The regular meeting agenda will be posted on the school system's Web site at www. carrollk12.org. Meetings will be broadcast live on CETV, Channel 21 on Adelphia cable TV, and repeated at 8 p.m. Thursday, Sunday and the following Thursday, and 9 a.m. Saturday. The board offices are at 125 N. Court St. Information: 410-751-3020.
NEWS
By KAREN NITKIN and KAREN NITKIN,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 18, 2005
At Fort Smallwood Elementary School in Pasadena and South Shore Elementary School in Crownsville, "character" is more than a word that kids learn before a spelling test. It's a quality that teachers and administrators actively work to instill in their pupils. Both schools were recognized this month for their character education programs by the Maryland Center for Character Education, a nonprofit organization established in 1992 that focuses on encouraging ethical behavior, both in schools and among private citizens and businesses.
SPORTS
By HEATHER A. DINICH and HEATHER A. DINICH,SUN REPORTER | November 16, 2005
College Park --The door to Room 1114 in the Gossett Football Team House is closed every Thursday and Sunday night for privacy. A pact was made that everything said in that meeting room stays in there. The young football players in Maryland's character education program talk about girls, sex and parties. They talk about the NFL and its agents, about the glitz and glam of the professional lifestyle, and the drugs and women that come with it. Some talk about the anger they carry from growing up without fathers, others about the fear of becoming one. They talk about teamwork and trust.
NEWS
By Arin Gencer and Arin Gencer,arin.gencer@baltsun.com | February 4, 2009
Standing in a locker room at Baltimore County's Kenwood High School, the teenage girl kept her cool when one of her peers passed by and hit her with a book bag. "Under normal circumstances, that would have been a major fight in our building," said teacher Nancy Hanlin, recounting the incident. Instead, Hanlin said, the girl told her classmate that she would have hit back "if I wasn't working on my virtues." The fight that wasn't illustrates the changes that school officials say they are seeing at Kenwood, where a new character education initiative called the Virtues Project has begun altering the way teachers, administrators and students communicate with one another.
NEWS
May 27, 2002
LET'S GET one thing straight from the start: Everyone wants children to develop good character traits - particularly these days, when so many challenges are thrown at them so young. That does not mean Lt. Gov. Kathleen Kennedy Townsend's push for expanding in-school character education represents solid thinking at this juncture about schools. Ms. Townsend, who recently raised the idea as one of the initial themes of her gubernatorial campaign, has been advocating such programs for years; Maryland already is among the nation's leaders in character education.
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