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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 30, 2010
Barney Cohen, a veteran Baltimore character actor whose work spanned local theaters and film, died Nov. 17 of pneumonia at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 93. Mr. Cohen was born in New York City and raised in Queens. He graduated in 1935 from Lincoln High School, where he had played varsity football. At New York University, where he earned a degree in 1939 in business, he continued playing football as a guard. With the coming of World War II, he enlisted in the Army and served as a military policeman at Los Alamos, N.M., where much of the work developing and testing the atomic bomb took place.
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By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 22, 2012
Baltimore one day, New York the next, Los Angeles the next: Such is the life of Fallston's Jonathon Ruckman, who has spent much of the past decade carving out a career as an actor. He's made commercials, appeared in soap operas, re-enacted crimes, played heavies and heroes. Sunday, he gets to sample the TV big time with a one-line guest role on HBO's "Boardwalk Empire. " "I play a recurring character," says Ruckman, though quickly adding that HBO isn't letting on about just how long his character will be around.
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By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | March 7, 1991
Jerry Lyden who plays the streetwise, cigar-chomping detective in the Fells Point Cabaret Theatre production of "Murder on the Waterfront," is making his mark as a professional character actor on stage and in films.The play, which has been extended to April 14, is one in which the dinner theater audience helps solve a series of murders. Lyden has given 200 performances in this particular theater genre and finds it the ultimate challenge for an actor."Once an actor has a modicum of experience, audience participation theater calls on all your resources to develop and maintain your ability to create a character other than yourself," he says.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun and Baltimore Sun reporter | November 30, 2010
Barney Cohen, a veteran Baltimore character actor whose work spanned local theaters and film, died Nov. 17 of pneumonia at Northwest Hospital Center. He was 93. Mr. Cohen was born in New York City and raised in Queens. He graduated in 1935 from Lincoln High School, where he had played varsity football. At New York University, where he earned a degree in 1939 in business, he continued playing football as a guard. With the coming of World War II, he enlisted in the Army and served as a military policeman at Los Alamos, N.M., where much of the work developing and testing the atomic bomb took place.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,Television Critic | February 13, 1992
On an afternoon in May 1966, John Glover, the first graduate of the Towson State University theater program, handed his father his freshly minted diploma and boarded a bus for New York City.This Saturday -- some 25 years later -- John Glover, Drama-Desk-award-winner and Emmy nominee, returns in triumph to Towson State to present a benefit show for the John Glover Scholarship Endowment for Acting Majors.The storyline sounds almost too perfect, doesn't it? Of such stuff is press-release mythology made.
FEATURES
By Ron Dicker and Ron Dicker,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 11, 2001
This time, William H. Macy gets the girl. He's even the hero. In the polite profanity of Jerry Lundegaard, Macy's bumbling car salesman from 1996's Fargo, what the heck is going on here? We've darned near upset the balance of the universe. Macy is reveling in the opportunities presented by Focus, which opens Friday in area theaters. It's based on a novel by Arthur Miller about anti-Semitism on the home front during World War II, and it presents a world where the industry's most revered character actor gets to make out with Laura Dern.
NEWS
November 25, 2002
Parley Baer, 88, a character actor who was the mayor on The Andy Griffith Show, the voice of the Keebler cookie elf in TV commercials and the voice of Chester on radio's Gunsmoke, died of a stroke Friday at the Motion Picture and Television Hospital in Woodland Hills, Calif. The jowly, balding actor appeared in more than 50 movies, including 1950s Westerns and 1963's Gypsy. He played the Senate majority leader in the 1993 movie Dave. Mr. Baer also made scores of TV appearances, and was Darby, Ozzie Nelson's next-door neighbor, on TV's The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet.
NEWS
April 29, 1999
Bert Remsen, 74, a character actor who amassed half a century of stage, television and film credits from "Pork Chop Hill" to the current "Forces of Nature," died April 22 in Los Angeles.Herbert Young, 112, who received France's Legion of Honor cross in February for his service during World War I, died April 22 in New York. A veteran of the Meuse-Argonne offensive, he served in one of many all-black units outfits that fought under the French flag because of U.S. Army segregation.
NEWS
August 5, 1994
* Bert Freed, 74, a character actor for five decades and longtime officer of the Screen Actors Guild, died of heart failure late Tuesday while vacationing near Vancouver, British Columbia. Born in New York, Mr. Freed made his Broadway debut in 1943 in "Johnny 2 x 4." He subsequently appeared in several stage plays, some 75 films and more than 200 television programs. He served on the board of the Screen Actors Guild from 1969 to 1989, and was its first vice president, a trustee of its Producers' Pension and Health Plans and founding chairman of its Seniors Committee.
NEWS
January 20, 2008
ALLAN MELVIN, 84 Character actor Allan Melvin, a character actor best known for playing Sam the Butcher on The Brady Bunch, died of cancer Thursday at his home in the Brentwood section of Los Angeles, said Amalia Melvin, his wife of 64 years. The jowly, jovial Mr. Melvin spent decades playing a series of sidekicks, second bananas and lovable lugs, including Archie Bunker's friend Barney Hefner on All in the Family, and Sgt. Ernie Bilko's right-hand man, Cpl. Steve Henshaw, on The Phil Silvers Show.
NEWS
By The Washington Post | July 2, 2009
Karl Malden, an Academy Award-winning actor who excelled in plain-spoken, working-class roles, including the awkward Mitch in A Streetcar Named Desire and a brave priest in On the Waterfront, died Wednesday at his home in Los Angeles. No cause of death was immediately disclosed. He was 97. Mr. Malden's bulbous nose and thinning hair made him one of the most familiar sights in movies and on television for five decades. In the 1970s, he became known to millions of viewers as a police veteran who partners with a young inspector played by Michael Douglas on the ABC drama series The Streets of San Francisco.
NEWS
December 11, 2008
ROBERT PROSKY, 77 Character actor appeared in 'Hill Street Blues' Robert Prosky, a character actor with hundreds of credits on stage and screen including Mrs. Doubtfire and Hill Street Blues, died Monday night in Washington, D.C., of complications from a heart procedure. Mr. Prosky appeared in more than 200 plays on Broadway and with Arena Stage, a regional theater company in Washington. He appeared in 38 films and numerous television shows. A native of Philadelphia, Mr. Prosky studied economics at Temple University and served in the Air Force.
NEWS
October 29, 2006
ARTHUR HILL, 84 Character actor Arthur Hill, a veteran character actor whose dozens of television and movie appearances included the title role in the series Owen Marshall, Counselor at Law, died Oct. 22 at a Pacific Palisades, Calif., care facility after a long battle with Alzheimer's disease. His was a well-known face on TV, appearing on Alfred Hitchcock Presents, The Defenders, Ben Casey, The Untouchables, Mission Impossible, The Fugitive and Marcus Welby, M.D. He was the star of Owen Marshall, Counselor at Law from 1971 to 1974.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly and Jacques Kelly,SUN STAFF | January 27, 2004
Peter C. Collins, a versatile character actor who appeared on Broadway as well as in the HBO drama series The Wire during more than 50 years in the industry, died Wednesday of an apparent heart attack at his Timonium home. He was 80. Appearing on numerous television soap operas in the 1960s and 1970s, he employed his deep, resonant voice for the many commercials he recorded for oil companies, drug companies, airlines and breweries. After living in New York, he moved to the Baltimore area more than a decade ago. "He was the quintessential character actor," said Pat Moran, a Baltimore casting agent who placed him as a judge in an episode of The Wire that aired last year.
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