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FEATURES
October 7, 1998
Parents encounter a lot of confusion when choosing books within the category variously named "Easy to Read," "Beginning to Read," "Early Chapter Books," etc. Many publishers have specific lines of books aimed at the child just venturing into solo reading. These will range from titles with no more than six words on a page to books with full pages of text and pictures every third page or so.How are you to make sense of the labels, color codes, levels and recommendations shouting from the covers?
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NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2012
Reporters love online publishing because it allows them to write at whatever length they choose and frees them from the constraint of print. They can uncap the well of their inky prose and let the reader frolic in the gusher, without fear that some hack on the copy desk will mutilate their burnished sentences.* They may be misguided. I do not fear prose. I've read what the children call chapter books, thick ones, for decades. I do not quail at long articles in, say, The New Yorker or The New York Review of Books . (I actually read and enjoyed that series on cereal grains published in the waning years of the Shawn era, the ones that were widely disparaged by people who had not read them.)
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FEATURES
By Paula Crouch Thrasher and Paula Crouch Thrasher,Cox News Service | November 2, 1993
After three decades of writing about the fun and foibles of a family of cartoon bears, author-illustrators Jan and Stan Berenstain have turned a page in the life of Mama, Papa, Brother and Sister Bear: Big Chapter Books.In the new series for young readers ages 7 to 10, the Berenstains use humor to tackle serious themes such as young love ("New Girl in Town"),drug abuse ("Drug Free Zone"), women's rights ("Female Fullback"), the physically challenged ("Wheelchair Commando") and theft ("Innocent Until Proven Guilty")
SPORTS
By RICK MAESE | May 29, 2007
When it was all over, despite desperate pleas and collective exhaustion, you couldn't help but notice that it wasn't really all over. The clock showed a string of zeros and the seats at the stadium emptied. While players in another locker room took turns holding their NCAA championship trophy, down the cement corridor beneath M&T Bank Stadium, in another room, members of the Duke lacrosse team sullenly packed their gym bags. The game was over -- they had lost the championship, 12-11, to Johns Hopkins -- but the saga that has come to define the Blue Devils program isn't fortunate enough to get packed away with the sticks and pads, tossed in a truck and thrown into storage.
FEATURES
November 18, 1998
Susan Rapp, director of the Columbia West Kumon Center, reviews "Road to Reading," a new series published by Golden Books (1998, $3.99).This series, consisting of five levels, provides children with some delightful texts on the road to independent reading. The stories and artwork are engaging because they have been created by distinguished authors and artists, including Margaret Wise Brown, Richard Scary and Sarah Albee.The books are designed without age or grade level. However, the vocabulary is controlled and the reading skill levels are guided.
NEWS
By John E. McIntyre and The Baltimore Sun | October 15, 2012
Reporters love online publishing because it allows them to write at whatever length they choose and frees them from the constraint of print. They can uncap the well of their inky prose and let the reader frolic in the gusher, without fear that some hack on the copy desk will mutilate their burnished sentences.* They may be misguided. I do not fear prose. I've read what the children call chapter books, thick ones, for decades. I do not quail at long articles in, say, The New Yorker or The New York Review of Books . (I actually read and enjoyed that series on cereal grains published in the waning years of the Shawn era, the ones that were widely disparaged by people who had not read them.)
NEWS
June 6, 1999
"The book 'From Slave Ship to Freedom Road' by Julius Lester is about Africans and how they lived as slaves. They were captured by the Spanish and brought to Jamestown, Va., on a big ship. They slept on shelves side-by-side. When it was time for them to wake up the men had to do their jobs. They had to be chained so they couldn't get away. The women had to wash clothes and others worked in the fields to plant crops. I like this book because it tells the story of my ancestors. I know that they fought for freedom so this world would be a better place for all African Americans."
NEWS
By Joy Green and Joy Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 2001
During the early 1990s, a group of school librarians recognized that Maryland did not have a statewide award for outstanding children's books. So in 1992, the Maryland Educational Media Organization developed the Black-Eyed Susan Book Award program. That program has blossomed into an annual contest that this year drew votes from 50,000 children throughout Maryland, and is credited by school librarians with drawing welcome attention to a wealth of children's literature that otherwise might have been overlooked.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff | February 7, 2000
They don't go into Room 8 much anymore. Once in a while, a few stick their heads in for quick hellos and hugs. But for most, Room 8 -- and first grade -- are memories of long ago. Those were the days of learning how to tell "b's" from "d's" and "p's" from "q's" -- of learning how to join letters to make words and words to make sentences. First grade was the year to begin cracking the code, to begin learning how to read. Last year's children of Room 8 at Cedarmere Elementary School in Reisterstown are now second-graders.
FEATURES
By SUSAN REIMER | August 15, 1995
The summer reading list -- distributed on the last day of school by well-meaning teachers -- is the special torment of the reluctant reader. All summer long, it stares at him from its place on the refrigerator door and flaps in his face each time he goes for something cold to drink.Once children have learned how to read, they are supposed to start reading the books on these kinds of lists. Books full of ideas, of layered meaning, of life's lessons. Books that contribute to the cultural literacy of their age group, whether it is "The Scarlet Letter" for high schoolers or "Shiloh" for grade schoolers.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | January 9, 2007
When he released the final volume to his civil rights-era trilogy last year, Taylor Branch called the 24-year project his "life's work." He wondered aloud at the time what he would do after such an undertaking. It appears Branch has found another passion: The historian has begun a book about being Bill Clinton's diarist during the former president's eight years in office. "I've just started writing it," said Branch from his home last week. "I started just after Labor Day." Through Clinton's presidency, Branch said he drove to the White House late at night about once a month to record the president recounting some of the more significant moments of his tenure.
NEWS
By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,SUN STAFF | September 19, 2004
The clouds threatened and the wind battered displays, but the heavy rain stopped shortly after the Baltimore Book Festival opened in Mount Vernon Place yesterday, allowing the city's premier literary event to go forward for the first time since 2002. "I was so upset about the cancellation last year," said Michelle Adams of Baltimore, who came with her husband and two young children. "I decided to come this year regardless of the weather." Although Tropical Storm Isabel forced organizers to scrap the three-day event last year, the remnants of Hurricane Ivan spared the ninth annual festival, which continues until 7 p.m. today with readings, entertainment and stall after stall of new and used books.
NEWS
By Joy Green and Joy Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | July 15, 2001
During the early 1990s, a group of school librarians recognized that Maryland did not have a statewide award for outstanding children's books. So in 1992, the Maryland Educational Media Organization developed the Black-Eyed Susan Book Award program. That program has blossomed into an annual contest that this year drew votes from 50,000 children throughout Maryland, and is credited by school librarians with drawing welcome attention to a wealth of children's literature that otherwise might have been overlooked.
NEWS
March 22, 2001
1. "Harry Potter and the Goblet Of Fire" by J.K. Rowling (weeks on list: 36) 2. "Harry Potter and the Prisoner Of Azkaban" by J.K. Rowling (79) 3. "Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone" by J.K. Rowling (118) 4. "Harry Potter and the Chamber Of Secrets" by J.K. Rowling (93) 5. "The Ersatz Elevator" by Lemony Snicket (3) 6. "The Bad Beginning" by Lemony Snicket (20) 7. "The Amber Spyglass" by Philip Pullman (23) 8. "A Year Down Yonder" by Richard Peck (8) 9. "Because Of Winn-Dixie" by Kate Dicamillo (8)
BUSINESS
By Dan Thanh Dang and Dan Thanh Dang,SUN STAFF | March 16, 2001
The home-grown bookstore chain that started nearly six years ago with great expectations opened the doors to all four of its Baltimore-area stores yesterday for the beginning of the end. There were no large going-out-of-business signs. No banners announcing discounted prices on the first day of a 90-day liquidation sale. Just a steady flow of loyal customers who read the bankruptcy notices posted on the doors, shook their heads and wondered aloud where they would go now that Bibelot was closing.
NEWS
January 21, 2001
The holidays are over, and perhaps much of the excitement has worn thin. Children can easily become bored during these blustery winter days when outdoor activities are cut short. However, you can still nourish your child's mind and find exciting literary. Here are some recommended cures for the winter blues by Junior Editions at Columbia Mall. BOOKS ABOUT ME: In these volumes children can print, draw and record details about their constantly developing lives, their self-discoveries, and they'll be making a treasure to keep for years to come.
NEWS
January 21, 2001
The holidays are over, and perhaps much of the excitement has worn thin. Children can easily become bored during these blustery winter days when outdoor activities are cut short. However, you can still nourish your child's mind and find exciting literary. Here are some recommended cures for the winter blues by Junior Editions at Columbia Mall. BOOKS ABOUT ME: In these volumes children can print, draw and record details about their constantly developing lives, their self-discoveries, and they'll be making a treasure to keep for years to come.
FEATURES
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris,sun reporter | January 9, 2007
When he released the final volume to his civil rights-era trilogy last year, Taylor Branch called the 24-year project his "life's work." He wondered aloud at the time what he would do after such an undertaking. It appears Branch has found another passion: The historian has begun a book about being Bill Clinton's diarist during the former president's eight years in office. "I've just started writing it," said Branch from his home last week. "I started just after Labor Day." Through Clinton's presidency, Branch said he drove to the White House late at night about once a month to record the president recounting some of the more significant moments of his tenure.
NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,Sun Staff | February 7, 2000
They don't go into Room 8 much anymore. Once in a while, a few stick their heads in for quick hellos and hugs. But for most, Room 8 -- and first grade -- are memories of long ago. Those were the days of learning how to tell "b's" from "d's" and "p's" from "q's" -- of learning how to join letters to make words and words to make sentences. First grade was the year to begin cracking the code, to begin learning how to read. Last year's children of Room 8 at Cedarmere Elementary School in Reisterstown are now second-graders.
NEWS
June 6, 1999
"The book 'From Slave Ship to Freedom Road' by Julius Lester is about Africans and how they lived as slaves. They were captured by the Spanish and brought to Jamestown, Va., on a big ship. They slept on shelves side-by-side. When it was time for them to wake up the men had to do their jobs. They had to be chained so they couldn't get away. The women had to wash clothes and others worked in the fields to plant crops. I like this book because it tells the story of my ancestors. I know that they fought for freedom so this world would be a better place for all African Americans."
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