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By Dave Kehr and Dave Kehr,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 6, 1997
"Charlie Chaplin and His Times" by Kenneth S. Lynn. Simon & Schuster. 574 pages. $35."He only plays himself as he was in his early dismal youth. He cannot get away from those impressions and to this day he obtains for himself the compensation for the frustrations and humiliations of that past period of his life. He is, so to speak, an exceptionally simple and transparent case."The subject is Charles Chaplin, the words are Sigmund Freud's, and they are quoted by Kenneth S. Lynn in his harsh new biography of the great comedian, where they constitute one of the very few gestures toward compassion and comprehension in this thick volume.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Tim Smith, The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Baltimore Symphony Orchestra music director Marin Alsop has canceled her scheduled appearances this week with the ensemble. Her mother, a cellist who spent several decades in the New York City Ballet Orchestra, died late last week in upstate New York at the age of 82. BSO principal pops conductor Jack Everly will be on the podium for the concerts, which feature the showing of two 1920s Charlie Chaplin films, "The Kid" and "The Idle Class," with...
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FEATURES
By J.L Conklin and J.L Conklin,Special to The Sun | March 9, 1995
You don't have to be a fan of Charlie Chaplin to enjoy French choreographer Roland Petit's balletic homage to the late film star, "Chaplin Dances," which opened its week-long engagement at the Kennedy Center Tuesday night.Mr. Petit and seven dancers from his Ballet National de Marseille bring the comedy, pathos and artistry of the beloved Little Tramp to life in a 90-minute program of 20 short dances. The dances, drawn from various films of Chaplin's are set to music by Fiorenzo Carpi, Chaplin and J.S. Bach.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | February 9, 2012
The most towering figure in Hollywood history wore ill-fitting clothes, including shoes several sizes too big, and never said a word. Beginning Saturday, he'll be spending a year at Baltimore's Charles Theatre . Charlie Chaplin, a British expatriate who became the first Hollywood superstar and made a series of films — as writer, director and star — still as astonishingly delightful today as they were in the 1920s, is the subject of a...
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | August 7, 2009
A Charlie Chaplin movie like his early masterpiece "The Kid" (1921) is an ideal choice for an open-air urban screening like the one at 8 tonight at the Clifton Park band shell. That's because Chaplin combined unparalleled high jinks with nonpareil sensitivity. Chaplin's combination of balletic grace and robust iconoclastic farce has never been equaled. He might have carried himself like a European aristocrat in his later years, but his hardscrabble London background was the prime source of his pathos-laden humor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,Film Critic | January 8, 1993
"Chaplin"Starring Robert Downey Jr.Directed by Sir Richard Attenborough.Released by TriStar.PG-13.... **It is sad but eloquent testimony to the dreariness of Sir Richard Attenborough's "Chaplin" that it only comes alive over the span of one 2-minute period, when the man on screen displays the grace, the vividness, the charisma, the hilarity of Charlie Chaplin. That is, of course, because he is Charle Chaplin.Including the archival footage toward the end is a big mistake, because it shows how magical the Little Tramp could be and how unmagical "Chaplin" has been.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | October 1, 2002
Charles Chaplin and Adolf Hitler were born in the same week of April 1889. Both proved to be great communicators (although Chaplin worked better without sound, while Hitler's famously demagogic speeches sort of depended on it), and both achieved worldwide fame. In actuality, those aren't a lot of points of comparison. And it is unlikely the two would be mentioned in the same breath, save for Chaplin's decision in 1938 to mock the sadistic German fuehrer in his first talking film, The Great Dictator.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Hettrick and Scott Hettrick,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | August 20, 1993
CHAPLIN(Live, $94.98, rated PG-13) 1992First and foremost, Robert Downey Jr. does an incredible job of capturing the mannerisms, the speech and the physical appearance of Charlie Chaplin. His best-actor Academy Award nomination was richly deserved.And we're not talking about simply impersonating the Little Tramp character that was introduced to a new generation by an actor in the IBM commercials of the 1980s (though Downey is even so good with that aspect that viewers will not notice the difference between him and the actual film clips of Chaplin that are seamlessly interwoven)
NEWS
By Todd Richissin and Todd Richissin,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 22, 2002
LONDON - The silence about Charlie Chaplin has been broken. Much of the chat of his native England yesterday was about how he was denied knighthood for nearly 20 years because prudish Americans felt he was a Communist little tramp. After decades of mystery, British government documents - which were secret until their release over the weekend - show that the snub of the colorful black-and-white movie actor was primarily the result of his marriages to two 16-year-olds and American reaction to them.
FEATURES
By Hal Boedeker and Hal Boedeker,ORLANDO SENTINEL | January 12, 2004
They never shared a marquee in life, but they're linked in death as coming attractions from Turner Classic Movies. Cary Grant, Charlie Chaplin and director Cecil B. DeMille will be profiled in major documentaries during the next six months. Charlie: The Life and Art of Charles Chaplin appears in March, along with 11 of the actor-director's films and 36 of his short films. Time critic Richard Schickel directed and wrote Charlie and conducted interviews with Woody Allen, Martin Scorsese, Johnny Depp, Marcel Marceau, Claire Bloom and Robert Downey Jr. Schickel also worked extensively with actress Geraldine Chaplin, his subject's daughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Janell Sutherland | December 5, 2011
Remember last week? When there were waffles? And some cars and boats, but mostly waffles!? Now there are four teams racing to the finale, and this week I get to introduce you to the friendliest taxi drivers in the world. First, we must bid farewell to Atomium, the centerpiece of the 1958 World's Fair. The teams got to sleep in little pods inside Atomium, and that is basically awesome. Teams leave Atomium in the middle of the night with a box of costumes. They have to wear black suits, skinny ties, moustaches and bowler hats.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,michael.sragow@baltsun.com | August 7, 2009
A Charlie Chaplin movie like his early masterpiece "The Kid" (1921) is an ideal choice for an open-air urban screening like the one at 8 tonight at the Clifton Park band shell. That's because Chaplin combined unparalleled high jinks with nonpareil sensitivity. Chaplin's combination of balletic grace and robust iconoclastic farce has never been equaled. He might have carried himself like a European aristocrat in his later years, but his hardscrabble London background was the prime source of his pathos-laden humor.
NEWS
By CHRIS KALTENBACH | January 3, 2009
Anyone who thinks of a silent film as something to be endured, not enjoyed, has never seen a film by the great Charlie Chaplin. To see what I mean, check out 1936's Modern Times (8 p.m., TCM), Chaplin's last silent and one of the greatest comedies of all time. Chaplin had been perfecting his Little Tramp character for nearly a quarter-century, and though talking pictures had come in nine years earlier, he saw no reason to add dialogue to his films; his screen persona - an unkempt, ill-clothed little fella who endured every social injustice the world could throw at him, while rarely losing his perspective and never losing his heart - spoke a universal language that had no need for dialogue.
NEWS
By Neal Gabler and Neal Gabler,Los Angeles Times | December 24, 2006
This month marks the 40th anniversary of Walt Disney's death from lung cancer, a long time by most measures and an eternity for figures in the popular culture, who usually evaporate quickly from our memories. To a surprising degree, however, he has managed to survive in the national consciousness, not just as a corporate logo but as a kind of cultural barometer. Ask just about anyone how he or she feels about Disney, and you are likely to get either a beaming tribute from those who recall him fondly and enjoy his animations and theme parks, or a scowling denunciation from those who see him as the great Satan of modern mass culture.
NEWS
January 29, 2006
On January 27, 2006, E. ANN (nee Caldwell) CHAPLINE, beloved wife of Gordon Calvert Chapline, cherished daughter of Margaret Caldwell (nee Goff) and the late Elford Hugh Caldwell, devoted mother of Gordon Allen Chapline and his wife Shannon, Brian Keith Chapline and his wife Mary Jane and Craig Caldwell Chapline and his wife Kathy, dear sister of Elford Hugh Caldwell Jr, also survived by 7 grandchildren. A Memorial Service will be held at the St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church, Lutherville, on Saturday February 4 at 11 A.M. In lieu of flowers, contributions may be made to St. Paul's Evangelical Lutheran Church, Gifts and Memorials, 1609 Kurtz Avenue, Lutherville MD, 21093.
FEATURES
By STEPHEN KIEHL and STEPHEN KIEHL,SUN REPORTER | November 16, 2005
Growing up in Baltimore, Heather Chaplin never played video games. Arcades made her scared and anxious, and she looked down on her peers who pumped quarters into game machines. When she got married, she made it clear to her husband, Aaron Ruby, that video games were not allowed in the house. So Ruby, who was in graduate school, secretly played the games on campus at Rutgers University. One day in 2000, he spirited a video game system into his home office. He thought he could get away with it. He was wrong.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,SUN MOVIE CRITIC | April 10, 2003
Back in the silents' days, movies didn't need words. They had faces, and two of the most famous were Charlie Chaplin and Buster Keaton. To this day, both The Tramp and The Great Stone Face remain among Hollywood's most identifiable stars, their humor and artistry undimmed by either the passage of time or the addition of dialogue to the movies. Did we mention that they're as funny as ever? Tonight at the Senator, 5904 York Road, as a fund-raiser for the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra, these two movie giants will be featured, giving local audiences not only the rare chance to see silent comedy on the big screen, but also to see them with musical accompaniment by the orchestra.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chicago Tribune | September 24, 2000
You've got to hand it to William Chaplin. His psychology students at the University of Alabama in Tuscaloosa asked him if people can actually form lasting opinions about people's personalities through a simple handshake. He didn't know the answer -- so Chaplin suggested his students design a research study about handshakes to find out. The proposed study, co-authored by Chaplin and four undergraduates, was published in a recent issue of the Journal of Personality and Social Psychology.
NEWS
October 26, 2005
On Monday, October 24, 2005, JEANNE F. SHAY (nee Chaplin) of Ferndale. Beloved wife of the late John P. SHAY, JR., devoted mother of Paula Bratt, Gerry Shay and the late John P. Shay, III. Loving sister of William Chaplin and the late Rae Haegerich. Also survived by five loving grandchildren and three great-grandchildren and many nieces and nephews. Loving mother-in-law of Charles Bratt and Cindy Shay. The family will receive visitors at the family owned Singleton Funeral Home, 1 Second Ave, SW, (at Crain Hwy)
NEWS
April 22, 2005
On Thursday, April 21, 2005, PAUL BLUM; loving husband of the late Bernice Blum (nee Stulman); devoted father of Barbara (Paul) Adams; beloved brother of Sylvia Wolf of Baltimore, MD and the late Gertrude Rubin and Ethel Bardoff. Also survived by grandchildren and great grandchildren. Funeral Services and Interment will be held at the Anshe Emunah Aitz Chaim Congregation Cemetery, 3901 Washington Blvd. on Friday, April 22 at 10 A.M. Please omit flowers. Contributions in his memory may be made to the Dorothy Friedman Chaplin Guild, P.O. Box 5728, Bedford Ave. (21208)
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