Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChap
IN THE NEWS

Chap

FEATURED ARTICLES
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN ARCHITECTURE CRITIC | March 21, 2005
For more than 40 years, Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation has been in the business of preserving historic places. Now it's embroiled in an effort to preserve itself - or at least its autonomy as an all-volunteer panel and watchdog within city government. A City Council bill introduced this year would change the composition of the 11-member panel to include two city employees as voting members in addition to volunteers nominated by preservation groups and others.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Luke Broadwater, The Baltimore Sun | July 22, 2014
Bob Creager opened his tiny pit beef stand in the parking lot of a Southeast Baltimore nightclub in 1987. The stand had no electricity. Creager had never run a business. And the former steelworker had no idea how to cook pit beef. "I was struggling," Creager says. These days, Creager's establishment - Chaps Pit Beef - is a Baltimore legend. His stand, in the parking lot of the Gentlemen's Gold Club on Pulaski Highway, has been featured on national television shows five times.
Advertisement
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | May 21, 2004
At a spirited City Hall forum last night attended by dozens of preservation activists, Baltimore's top planning official, Otis Rolley III, defended a city government shuffle that will move the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation to the planning department July 1. Judith P. Miller, the commission chairwoman, assured a network of city activists that the merger could benefit the city's planning and preservation efforts without eroding...
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 9, 2014
The Baltimore City Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation on Tuesday approved a developer's exterior renovation plans for the conversion of an historic former home for unwed mothers into apartments. CHAP voted 6-1 to approve staff recommendations endorsing the renovation of the mansion, the old Florence Crittenton Home for Girls at 3110 Crittenton Place in Hampden. Developer John Brooks wants to convert the house into 14 apartments, plus one in a nearby cottage.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | July 28, 2005
A proposed merger of Baltimore's preservation agency and Planning Department came a step closer yesterday after a City Council hearing showed that many local preservationists could support the arrangement, albeit with reservations. After hearing three hours of testimony about a council bill that would make Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation (CHAP) part of the Planning Department, Urban Affairs Committee Chairwoman Paula Johnson Branch promised a final bill that would keep CHAP strong even though it would be integrated with the city department.
NEWS
By Larry Perl, lperl@tribune.com | April 9, 2014
The Baltimore City Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation on Tuesday approved a developer's exterior renovation plans for the conversion of an historic former home for unwed mothers into apartments. CHAP voted 6-1 to approve staff recommendations endorsing the renovation of the mansion, the old Florence Crittenton Home for Girls at 3110 Crittenton Place in Hampden. Developer John Brooks wants to convert the house into 14 apartments, plus one in a nearby cottage.
NEWS
By James Determan and Gordon T. Ingerson | July 26, 2005
THE FORCES OF historic preservation and opposing interests have manned the trenches again, and the bodies have begun to pile up. This particular conflict is being fought over the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation (CHAP) in an apparent attempt to weaken its influence as it relocates from the city's Department of Housing and Community Development to the Planning Department. The Baltimore component of the American Institute of Architects, AIABaltimore, believes that this clash is entirely unnecessary and completely avoidable.
NEWS
By Chris Kaltenbach and Chris Kaltenbach,chris.kaltenbach@baltsun.com | May 13, 2009
Changes to the interior of Baltimore's embattled Senator Theatre must now be approved by the city's Commission on Historical and Architectural Preservation. Tuesday's move to protect the 70-year-old movie house is the first time the preservation panel would have authority over the inside of a building. Previous action has affected only exteriors. "Fans of the Senator Theatre want to preserve the building and see it continue as a film and performing arts venue," said CHAP Chairman Tyler Gearhart.
NEWS
October 7, 1994
The acronym CHAP connotes something friendly. But many Baltimoreans can attest to the fact that the city's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation can be a real pain and a stickler for authenticity. Yet as this group now commemorates its 30th anniversary, it is clear that Baltimore is a far better and more interesting place because of its efforts.CHAP's birth in 1964 was closely connected to efforts to win official protection for Mount Vernon, the city's most prestigious public square.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | December 12, 2006
Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation (CHAP) will consider granting landmark status today to a row of historic downtown homes slated for demolition by Mercy Medical Center. Preservationists are trying to prevent the hospital from razing the 1820s-era houses in the 300 block of St. Paul Place, some of the oldest downtown, for a planned $292 million expansion. City housing officials gave Mercy a demolition permit Friday, and Baltimore Heritage, a preservation organization, immediately appealed, arguing that a law paving the way for Mercy to quickly get the permit passed the City Council improperly.
BUSINESS
By Natalie Sherman | February 11, 2014
The longtime head of Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation, who oversaw its fight to protect the city's old structures for more than three decades, announced her retirement Tuesday. Kathleen Kotarba, a 1975 graduate of the Maryland Institute College of Art, began her 38-year tenure in city government in 1974 and has served as CHAP's executive director since 1981. During that time, the commission named 21 of the city's 33 historic districts, identified 127 of the roughly 180 Baltimore City landmarks, restored the Edgar Allan Poe House and Museum, established a popular city tax credit for historic restoration and launched a program focused on conservation of the city's monuments, among other achievements.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Jordan Bartel and Assistant editor, b | January 19, 2014
That "glamorous pirate" Lord Gillingham is working on some sort of Guinness World Record of pursuit here.  I'd be weirded out a bit if Tony wasn't more likeable. He's proper, but not insufferable. And doesn't get drunk easily like Sir John "Dimples" Bullock. And Mary is clearly a catch -- she has the looks, the property and side-saddle riding abilities. But compared with Matthew Crawley's epic 147-year courtship of Mary, Lord Gillingham's unexpected marriage proposal seems pretty jarring.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert | August 2, 2013
  Michael Plaisted said he wasn't pleased when he learned a few weeks ago that the annual property tax bill on his Ridgely's Delight condominium had jumped by hundreds of dollars. But he says he has become increasingly frustrated trying to get the City of Baltimore to tell him why the increase occurred. “All I want is an answer from the city saying this is the calculation we used and this is why your taxes doubled,” he said Friday. “I haven't gotten anything from the city.” By Friday, he said he had made three phone calls and sent one email to the city.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 4, 2013
There's no one way to describe Sabrina Chap -- and that's what we love about her. She's a musician and songwriter - her latest album, "We Are the Parade" boasts a title track about marriage equality. She often performs with burlesque and variety shows. And she plays a mean kazoo. "Someone once called me a mix of Julie Andrews and Divine, which I love," said the 35-year-old, whose real last name is Chapadjiev. "I've also gotten 'Tom Waits with a hint of Phyllis Diller. And though she lives in Brooklyn, N.Y., Chap has often performed in Baltimore for the past few years.
NEWS
By John C. Murphy | September 19, 2012
Lurking beneath the surface of the controversy over the future of the Morris Mechanic Theatre are two issues which, if not resolved, can only be described as tragedies for the future of historic preservation in Baltimore. The first is the undermining of the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation (CHAP). Five years ago, CHAP recommended that the Mechanic be designated a landmark. The recommendation languished because of the economic downturn, but on May 17, in response to an application to demolish the Mechanic, CHAP wrote Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake asking that an ordinance be introduced in the City Council to landmark the building.
NEWS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | September 11, 2012
Baltimore's historical preservation commission on Tuesday officially disapproved of demolishing the Morris A. Mechanic Theatre. The vote by the Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation, or CHAP, means the city's Department of Housing and Community Development, which issues demolition permits, will not be able to proceed for at least six months. Owings Mills-based developer David S. Brown Enterprises Ltd. and the Washington architecture firm Shalom Baranes Associates released plans in the spring that called for the demolition of the Mechanic and the construction of two residential towers in its place.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen and Jill Rosen,Sun reporter | May 27, 2007
The first whiff of trouble was the application that relied on the support of a dead man. Next came the accusations of gerrymandering. Baltimore's Planning Commission didn't need to hear much more of Brick Hill's and Woodberry's appeals to become official city historic districts. With a scolding, the commission recently sent them both back to the drawing board. "I hate to do this, but clearly [the petitions were] interpreted in a questionable and nebulous fashion," Chairman Peter Auchincloss told the disappointed neighborhood leaders and officials with the city's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,SUN STAFF | May 22, 2000
The owners of a Union Square tavern expect to learn today if the city will tear down what is left of their $125,000 investment, which partially collapsed Saturday, or risk bracing rear and side walls so repairs can be made. None of the workers installing wallboard inside the 160-year-old building at Little Hollins Street and Arlington Avenue in Southwest Baltimore was injured when a major portion of the front wall suddenly caved in. A neighborhood resident, who had just left Glen and Nan's Beer Garden and Cafe with a cup of coffee, suffered a head injury that required stitches, according to fire officials.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 27, 2012
Baltimore's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation decided not to vote on the ouster of the commission's executive director Monday. During a closed-door meeting, the commission opted not to take a vote on the removal of Kathleen Kotarba because "no action was requested of us," said a member of the commission who declined to be named because personnel discussions are confidential. Public notice of the meeting was made less than a week ago. It is not clear who in Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake's administration initiated the meeting to discuss Kotarba's job performance.
BUSINESS
By Steve Kilar, The Baltimore Sun | August 14, 2012
Members of the city's historical preservation commission indicated Tuesday that they favor demolishing theMorris A. Mechanic Theatre. "To me, it is obvious that the Mechanic is going to be demolished," said Larry Gibson, a member of the Planning Department's Commission for Historical and Architectural Preservation, or CHAP, during the group's monthly meeting. "It is simply a matter of when, not a matter of whether. " The commission is at the center of a debate over whether the cast-concrete "Brutalist" theater, built more than 40 years ago, is worth saving.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.