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Chaos Theory

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By TOM PETERS and TOM PETERS,1991 TPG COMMUNICATIONS | August 26, 1991
I devoured James Gleick's book, "Chaos." It certifies a notion dear to my heart -- that the messy aspects of phenomena are the most important. Before chaos theory, for instance, scientists taught us that big effects were generally the result of big causes. Now chaoticians suggest that "small changes in initial conditions" cause enormous consequences.Suppose, for instance, you're bonked on the noggin by a flowerpot that falls off a third-floor window ledge. What complex chain of events in your life, the life of the third-floor tenant, the building architect, etc., led you and that flowerpot to meet up?
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By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 20, 2009
Sid Carcress, in Catonsville, wonders whether the "butterfly effect" -- that the flap of a butterfly's wings can stir up a faraway storm -- could possibly be true. Perhaps. This poetic notion from chaos theory is called "sensitive dependance on initial conditions." In 1961, meteorologist Edward Lorenz made a minuscule change in a computer weather model and got a completely different outcome. He coined the term.
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NEWS
April 17, 2008
Edward Lorenz, 90 Chaos theorist Edward Lorenz, the father of chaos theory, died yesterday in Cambridge, Mass., at age 90. He was a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology when he came up with the scientific concept that small effects lead to big changes, something that became known as the "butterfly effect."
NEWS
April 17, 2008
Edward Lorenz, 90 Chaos theorist Edward Lorenz, the father of chaos theory, died yesterday in Cambridge, Mass., at age 90. He was a professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology when he came up with the scientific concept that small effects lead to big changes, something that became known as the "butterfly effect."
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By FRANK ROYLANCE and FRANK ROYLANCE,frank.roylance@baltsun.com | September 20, 2009
Sid Carcress, in Catonsville, wonders whether the "butterfly effect" -- that the flap of a butterfly's wings can stir up a faraway storm -- could possibly be true. Perhaps. This poetic notion from chaos theory is called "sensitive dependance on initial conditions." In 1961, meteorologist Edward Lorenz made a minuscule change in a computer weather model and got a completely different outcome. He coined the term.
NEWS
October 16, 2005
Prize-winning academic distinction is not uncommon in Maryland. The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and University of Maryland, College Park, each lists dozens of faculty members who have been honored for their extraordinary scholarship in mathematics, science, history, medicine and letters. And there is no shortage of achievers at other public and private schools across the state. Many agree that a major payoff from winning a major award is the fact that it opens doors to more interesting research.
NEWS
By Reported by Frank P. L. Somerville | May 19, 1995
Thursday is Ascension Day on the Christian calendar, marking Christ's bodily ascension into heaven 40 days after his resurrection. It will be celebrated in a variety of ways in Baltimore-area churches.Two Thursday evening programs are a symposium on "The New Science and its Theological Implications" at Baltimore's Episcopal Cathedral of the Incarnation, and a festival service at Holy Nativity Lutheran Church in Arbutus, in which the pastors and choirs of 10 other Missouri Synod congregations will participate.
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By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,Staff Writer | January 17, 1993
Two Maryland scientists have demonstrated for the first time the physics behind some of nature's most intriguing forms: complex geometric shapes called fractals.The researchers hope their work, published in this week's edition of Science magazine, may one day help explain why everything from cracks to galaxy clusters, from clouds to coastlines, from bronchial tubes to blood vessels assume fractal shapes."They are everywhere we look and are obviously an important organizing principle in the universe," said one of the scientists, John C. Sommerer of the Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel.
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By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to The Sun | August 13, 1995
John Barth has his opposed sides: the author, the teacher; the retiree, still at work; port and starboard (his home is on land, but at the moment he and his wife are very likely out on the Bay). And further, the heavyweight novelist ("The Floating Opera," "The Sot-Weed Factor," "Chimera") who also publishes very readable nonfiction.Ten years ago, "The Friday Book" was a collection of essays, lectures and papers; Barth explained that his work pattern is fiction four days a week, then Friday for the unimagined life.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | September 6, 2004
ATLANTA - Just suspend disbelief for a little while. If you can do that - forget those annoying facts, ignore the complexities of world affairs and disregard chaos theory - you can believe that President Bush will win the war on terror. You can believe. But it requires some selective amnesia. You have to forget that Osama bin Laden - "We'll smoke him out of his cave," Mr. Bush declared three years ago - is still at large and planning murderous attacks. You have to ignore the aggressive insurgency in Iraq, ordinary Iraqis' resentment of the U.S. occupation and the failure to turn up weapons of mass destruction or evidence of a significant relationship between Saddam Hussein and bin Laden.
BUSINESS
By LAURA SMITHERMAN and LAURA SMITHERMAN,SUN REPORTER | December 25, 2005
Author Laurence Gonzales, an aerobatics pilot, outdoorsman and all-around adrenaline junkie, stood in front of a group of Legg Mason Inc.'s top-flight investment professionals earlier this month and confessed: "I don't know anything about investment or finance or that sort of thing." But Gonzales, in his khaki jeans and loose-fitting button-down, was more than happy to impart his thoughts on survival strategies to a male-dominated audience in crisp dress shirts and ties. Legg Mason Capital Management, the company's stock-picking shop in Baltimore, had invited Gonzales to do just that, and gave each employee a copy of his book, Deep Survival: Who Lives, Who Dies, and Why, a thoughtful look at plane crashes, hiking accidents and boat sinkings.
NEWS
October 16, 2005
Prize-winning academic distinction is not uncommon in Maryland. The Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and University of Maryland, College Park, each lists dozens of faculty members who have been honored for their extraordinary scholarship in mathematics, science, history, medicine and letters. And there is no shortage of achievers at other public and private schools across the state. Many agree that a major payoff from winning a major award is the fact that it opens doors to more interesting research.
NEWS
By Cynthia Tucker | September 6, 2004
ATLANTA - Just suspend disbelief for a little while. If you can do that - forget those annoying facts, ignore the complexities of world affairs and disregard chaos theory - you can believe that President Bush will win the war on terror. You can believe. But it requires some selective amnesia. You have to forget that Osama bin Laden - "We'll smoke him out of his cave," Mr. Bush declared three years ago - is still at large and planning murderous attacks. You have to ignore the aggressive insurgency in Iraq, ordinary Iraqis' resentment of the U.S. occupation and the failure to turn up weapons of mass destruction or evidence of a significant relationship between Saddam Hussein and bin Laden.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 18, 2003
John Astin doesn't mind being identified with Gomez Addams, the "creepy and kooky" character he played for years on television's The Addams Family. "I loved the show and enjoyed playing the character, and have no problem with the identification. In many ways, Gomez is an extension of my own inner life - there's an awful lot of me in Gomez," Astin says. Having moved on to a demanding and fulfilling theatrical career that includes teaching, acting, writing, directing and producing, Astin will take the stage in Annapolis this month to portray a very different character, 19th-century American author Edgar Allan Poe. He will perform the one-man show April 25 at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts.
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By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | December 18, 2002
A former colleague once introduced University of Maryland mathematician James A. Yorke as "the man who brought chaos to mathematics." It wasn't a criticism. Yesterday it was announced that Yorke will share the 2003 Japan Prize in science and technology for his pioneering work in the relatively young mathematical field of "chaos" theory. His theoretical research, and that of his multidisciplinary Chaos Group at Maryland's Institute for Physical Science and Technology, is now being used to illuminate complex real-world problems as diverse as infectious disease transmission, weather forecasting and population changes in biological systems.
NEWS
By James H. Bready and James H. Bready,Special to The Sun | August 13, 1995
John Barth has his opposed sides: the author, the teacher; the retiree, still at work; port and starboard (his home is on land, but at the moment he and his wife are very likely out on the Bay). And further, the heavyweight novelist ("The Floating Opera," "The Sot-Weed Factor," "Chimera") who also publishes very readable nonfiction.Ten years ago, "The Friday Book" was a collection of essays, lectures and papers; Barth explained that his work pattern is fiction four days a week, then Friday for the unimagined life.
NEWS
By Mary Johnson and Mary Johnson,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 18, 2003
John Astin doesn't mind being identified with Gomez Addams, the "creepy and kooky" character he played for years on television's The Addams Family. "I loved the show and enjoyed playing the character, and have no problem with the identification. In many ways, Gomez is an extension of my own inner life - there's an awful lot of me in Gomez," Astin says. Having moved on to a demanding and fulfilling theatrical career that includes teaching, acting, writing, directing and producing, Astin will take the stage in Annapolis this month to portray a very different character, 19th-century American author Edgar Allan Poe. He will perform the one-man show April 25 at Maryland Hall for the Creative Arts.
NEWS
By Reported by Frank P. L. Somerville | May 19, 1995
Thursday is Ascension Day on the Christian calendar, marking Christ's bodily ascension into heaven 40 days after his resurrection. It will be celebrated in a variety of ways in Baltimore-area churches.Two Thursday evening programs are a symposium on "The New Science and its Theological Implications" at Baltimore's Episcopal Cathedral of the Incarnation, and a festival service at Holy Nativity Lutheran Church in Arbutus, in which the pastors and choirs of 10 other Missouri Synod congregations will participate.
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