Advertisement
HomeCollectionsChaos
IN THE NEWS

Chaos

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
February 16, 2011
Unfortunately, with the limited experience that Egypt has with democracy, there is a very good chance that we shall see continuing chaos in that nation, spreading throughout the Middle East, a region not noted for listening to the voices of its own people. The results in Iran were devastating, with the initial acceptance of a purported democratic government, destroyed by the accession of Khomeini to power. Fortunately, the religious leaders of Egypt do not have the same following, but with the Muslim Brotherhood a strong factor we may be looking at a theocratic government with no possible conversion to what we consider a democracy.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 11, 2014
Just when it seemed the situation in Iraq couldn't get any worse, the government moved a step closer to collapsing into chaos on Sunday when its president, Fuad Masum, formally nominated a candidate to replace the country's authoritarian prime minister, Nouri al-Maliki, in an effort to break the political paralysis gripping the country since parliamentary elections in April. From there, things went straight downhill. President Masum named Haider Abadi, a member of Mr. Maliki's own Shiite Islamist Dawa Party, as the next prime minister, urging him to forge a broad coalition government to unify the country against Sunni extremists who have taken over large swaths of Iraq in recent weeks and are threatening to march on the capital.
Advertisement
NEWS
May 1, 1991
The City Council may know what voters want, but at this point -- with revenues dipping, homeowners fuming, the middle class leaving and services slipping -- it seems totally incapable of carrying out their wishes. In short, the process of governing has degenerated into chaos.This week alone, the council -- considering a bare-bones budget that denies pay raises to city workers and retains an onerous property tax rate -- voted to cut revenues by rescinding the container tax, without putting anything in its place.
NEWS
June 26, 2014
As chaos erupted again in Iraq last week among Sunni and Shiite Muslim factions, President Barack Obama said he would send 300 military advisers to assist in bringing the contending groups under control ("Kerry in Iraq, urges change," June 24). It is indeed unfortunate that the upheavals the president is attempting to extinguish were initiated by him personally when he brought all of our military forces home from Iraq at the end of 2011. This maneuver was obviously nothing more than an opportunity to enhance his prospects for re-election in 2012.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS DAVIS | January 2, 1994
The rise of the Prediction Company, a business in Santa Fe, N.M., determined to turn the unruly new sciences of "chaos theory" and complexity studies into a forecasting tool, is the first predictable event in years.We consistently lust after certainty, lavishing our fortunes on pollsters, forecasters, prophets. Now comes a new posse of brilliant scientists pledging to shame Nostradamus by exploiting the very non-linear computer theories that have lately proved the universe doesn't follow law or routine.
NEWS
By Jim Salvucci | May 23, 2011
"If I wasn't Bob Dylan, I'd probably think that Bob Dylan has a lot of answers myself. " —Bob Dylan Bob Dylan turns 70 on Tuesday, and one has to wonder about his relevance in the Digital Age — the age of hip-hop, Guitar Hero and "American Idol. " I teach a college course on the life and work of Bob Dylan, and, not surprisingly, this question arises among my students. But the question assumes that art loses value as the artist ages, that the beauty fades, that the wisdom dissipates.
NEWS
June 26, 2014
As chaos erupted again in Iraq last week among Sunni and Shiite Muslim factions, President Barack Obama said he would send 300 military advisers to assist in bringing the contending groups under control ("Kerry in Iraq, urges change," June 24). It is indeed unfortunate that the upheavals the president is attempting to extinguish were initiated by him personally when he brought all of our military forces home from Iraq at the end of 2011. This maneuver was obviously nothing more than an opportunity to enhance his prospects for re-election in 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
How much have media sins contributed to the toxic tone and deadly dysfunction in D.C.? That's one of the questions tackled in the conversation Sunday morning that I was part of with Howard Kurtz and James Rosen. Check it out. #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; } #sigheadshot{ float: left; margin: 0px 10px 0px 0px; } #sigtwitter { margin-right: 5px; } #sigtooltip { padding: 5px; border-radius: 5px; -moz-border-radius: 5px; -webkit-border-radius: 5px; }
NEWS
February 3, 1993
Zaire and Somalia have notable differences. Zaire has five times as many people and three times the land area. Zaire is much richer in resources, and therefore matters more to the outside world. Zaire's society is breaking down, while Somalia's has broken down. And what happens to Zaire is more Washington's responsibility than Somalia is.Last weekend's mutiny of troops paid in new currency they consider worthless, the death of some 1,000 people in riots, the murder of the French ambassador and the rescue of Europeans in Kinshasa by French troops crossing the Congo River from the Republic of Congo are part of the death agony of President Mobutu Sese Seko's regime.
NEWS
By DOUGLAS BIRCH and DOUGLAS BIRCH,SUN REPORTER | May 28, 2006
Outside the First District police headquarters in New Orleans last September, a squad of heavily armed officers waded through water along Basin Street toward Canal. They were quitting, they said. After Hurricane Katrina, the floods, the looting, the collapse of basic services, even the police didn't feel safe. For a few days, the residents of the Gulf Coast got a taste of life in the world's failed states - dozens of countries, from Haiti to Sierra Leone, where electricity and potable water are scarce, governments feeble and the rule of law a daydream.
NEWS
By Colin Campbell, The Baltimore Sun | June 19, 2014
Sean Sneeton was picking up a colleague for work Friday morning when he turned around to walk back to his car and saw the escaped steer trotting down Druid Hill Avenue toward him. He tried to take a picture, and when the animal started toward him, he got back in his car and called 911. Sneeton was among nearly a dozen witnesses who struggled to explain the odd situation to police dispatchers in tapes of the calls released to the media Thursday night....
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen and For The Baltimore Sun | May 1, 2014
It's night 28, and things are a little subdued after Tribal Council. Jefra tries to explain why she didn't make her big move. Kass talks a bunch of smack about Spencer that isn't really warranted. Spencer laments the fact that he wasted his Idol, but that's still better than being sent home without playing it. Treemail time. They get wallets of money, because it's time for the "Survivor" auction. Tony is already planning ahead to use his money not for food, but for whatever advantage that might be up for bid. Spencer is also totally all over that, and, frankly, he needs it more.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Adelle Waldman | November 22, 2013
I didn't intend to throw a "Risky Business"-style New Year's blowout at my parents' house to ring in the year 1996. It just happened. A lot of things just happen when you are 19 and a sophomore in college; at least that's how it felt to me. I was home in Baltimore from school in Rhode Island, and my parents, who liked to travel, were away. When you are not yet 21, the question of what to do on New Year's tends to loom large. All I did was mention casually to the right (wrong?
ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore Sun | October 7, 2013
How much have media sins contributed to the toxic tone and deadly dysfunction in D.C.? That's one of the questions tackled in the conversation Sunday morning that I was part of with Howard Kurtz and James Rosen. Check it out. #sigshell { float: left; width: 320px; height: 52px; margin: 20px 0px; display: block; } #sigheadshot{ float: left; margin: 0px 10px 0px 0px; } #sigtwitter { margin-right: 5px; } #sigtooltip { padding: 5px; border-radius: 5px; -moz-border-radius: 5px; -webkit-border-radius: 5px; }
ENTERTAINMENT
By Beth Aaltonen and For The Baltimore Sun | September 26, 2013
This episode opens with Marissa arriving at Redemption Island, and she totally knows that Gervase is the reason why she was voted out. Candice thinks that it's because she called out Brad, and he's already running that tribe. She's not wrong. The next morning, everybody at Galang is getting along; they've got a back-rub conga thing going on, and it's all basically good. Which means Colton must lose his mind, because there's too much niceness and it must stop. Monica tells him that he needs to be patient.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Scott Dance and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2013
Just to answer the dated tan plastic phone at the R Adams Cowley Shock Trauma Center, you have to take an annual two-hour course. And when it rings, with its two-tone signal like an old British ambulance, everyone pays attention. A voice on the other end, an EMT somewhere in Maryland, rattles through the need-to-knows over a speaker: age, gender, and manner, severity and location of injuries. Whether a patient is lethargic, immobilized, disoriented or unresponsive. All is scribbled shorthand onto translucent marker board, known to all as “the board,” as a crowd of staff looks on. The board reads as a preview of what's to come for the doctors, nurses and other staff of Shock Trauma, and what they already have on their hands.
SPORTS
By Chris Korman | May 11, 2012
A steady, cool wind swept across the track at the Fair Hill Training Center Friday as two trainers prepared colts to run in next Saturday's 137 th Preakness. Went the Day Well, the fourth-place finisher in the Kentucky Derby trained by Graham Motion, and Teeth of the Dog, trained by Michael Matz, went out early this morning. It was Went the Day Well's first trip to the track since running in Kentucky; he galloped a mile. “He looked good, did well,” Motion said. “I continue to be impressed with him.” Went the Day Well will continue jogging at Fair Hill until early next week, when he'll ship to Pimlico to get accustomed to the new surroundings.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | November 18, 1993
Washington. -- President Clinton's passionate philippic in a black church in Memphis last Saturday demonstrated that, regarding inner-city violence, the range of the discussable is expanding, but we still are a far cry from candor.Mr. Clinton, a government man, instinctively believes that the underclass, which he says might better be called the outer class, principally lacks what governments can provide -- services, work. His instinct is reinforced by reading sociologist William Julius Wilson's analysis of how, in Mr. Clinton's words, the inner cities ''have crumbled as work has disappeared.
NEWS
September 9, 2013
Members of Wiltondale swim club in Towson say they were the first ever to hold a dog swim at the end of the swim season. Regardless, the annual anticipated event draws many canines panting for their one chance to do the doggie paddle in the community pool and crowds of humans to cheer them on. It's ready set - run! And off they go, diving off boards, leaping in from the sides and soon the pool is a swirling, choppy, wet playground to the pups. "It's chaotic," said Janine Ptak, executive director of the Wiltondale Pool.
SPORTS
Kevin Cowherd | December 12, 2012
The question came at the end of John Harbaugh's news conference Wednesday, and it signaled one of those days for the Ravens coach. "John," a guy said, "some people would say this is dancing very close to the edge of chaos. " "No, that's ridiculous," Harbaugh said, giving the questioner his best death-stare. "It's ridiculous. " Leaving the podium, the normally affable Harbaugh then hurried over to the reporter to re-emphasize - this time more personally - how ridiculous he thought the question was. That's the kind of day it was at the Castle, where the Ravens seemed determined to show that all was still right in their world.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.