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NEWS
July 6, 2011
The Sun's story on cardiovascular risks posed by smoking-cessation drug Chantix was an example of misleading statistics and careless journalism ("Chantix may cause more heart attacks than previously thought," July 5). The article presents what sounds like a startling finding: Chantix may increase a person's risk of serious cardiovascular problems by 72 percent. However, the research on which the article was based tells a different story. The actual risk of a serious cardiovascular event was 0.82 percent in patients who took a placebo versus 1.06 percent in patients who took Chantix.
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NEWS
July 7, 2011
I wish to comment on the article about the anti-smoking drug Chantix ("Stop-smoking pill called risky," July 5). It says that it is risky to healthy smoking middle-aged people. But I happen to know there are those who don't suffer from these side effects and are middle aged smokers. If the drug helps people stop smoking, then in my opinion the risk is worth it! People who smoke started taking risks the moment they picked up their first cigarette. I wish that the reporter had mentioned more success stories about the drug than non-success stories.
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NEWS
July 6, 2011
News that a popular prescription medication that helps smokers kick the habit may carry an increased risk of heart attack and other cardiovascular problems shouldn't discourage tobacco users from trying to quit. The long-term health benefits of quitting are undisputed, while the dangers of continuing to puff away are both deadly and well-documented. If one method of stopping is found to be unsafe, smokers will still have a wide variety of other remedies to turn to. The study published Monday by Johns Hopkins researcher Dr. Sonal Singh found that Chantix, an anti-smoking drug that had sales of $755 million last year, carries a statistically significant increase in the risk for a heart attack or other serious heart problems in healthy, middle-aged smokers.
NEWS
July 6, 2011
The Sun's story on cardiovascular risks posed by smoking-cessation drug Chantix was an example of misleading statistics and careless journalism ("Chantix may cause more heart attacks than previously thought," July 5). The article presents what sounds like a startling finding: Chantix may increase a person's risk of serious cardiovascular problems by 72 percent. However, the research on which the article was based tells a different story. The actual risk of a serious cardiovascular event was 0.82 percent in patients who took a placebo versus 1.06 percent in patients who took Chantix.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2011
A new study led by a Johns Hopkins researcher says the popular anti-smoking drug Chantix significantly increases the risk for a heart attack or other serious heart problem in healthy, middle-aged smokers. Dr. Sonal Singh, the study's lead author, is calling for warnings on the drug to be stronger than those currently required by the Food and Drug Administration. "People want to quit smoking to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, but in this case they're taking a drug that increases the risk for the very problems they're trying to avoid," said Singh, an assistant professor of general internal medicine.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 22, 2008
WASHINGTON - The Federal Aviation Administration banned pilots and air traffic controllers yesterday from using a popular anti-smoking drug after a study found that it had apparently contributed to auto accidents and other mishaps that posed risks to both users and others. The drug, marketed as Chantix, has been hailed as an innovative treatment to help smokers quit. But a study by a medical safety group - also issued yesterday - linked it to a variety of unusual and serious side effects, including loss of consciousness and seizures, and prompted the FAA to act, said spokesman Les Dorr.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon and Joe and Teresa Graedon,peoplespharmacy.com | September 29, 2008
My husband and I recently combined forces in a spectacular kitchen accident. He was heating water in a French press coffee pot in the microwave, and unknowingly heated it too much. As he picked up the pot and walked away from the microwave, the superheated water erupted into his face. In running to see what had happened, I slipped in the water, and hit my shoulder in the fall. I remembered reading about soy sauce for burns in one of your columns, and he quickly applied a liberal amount to his face.
NEWS
July 7, 2011
I wish to comment on the article about the anti-smoking drug Chantix ("Stop-smoking pill called risky," July 5). It says that it is risky to healthy smoking middle-aged people. But I happen to know there are those who don't suffer from these side effects and are middle aged smokers. If the drug helps people stop smoking, then in my opinion the risk is worth it! People who smoke started taking risks the moment they picked up their first cigarette. I wish that the reporter had mentioned more success stories about the drug than non-success stories.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | January 31, 2008
My orthopedic doctor did not warn me that the anti-inflammatory drug he prescribed might raise my blood pressure. When it spiked to 172/92, I got scared. The doctor did not respond to my complaints, and a pharmacist said it was not a side effect of the medicine. When I stopped the NSAID, my blood pressure returned to normal (122/70). Can you relieve pain and inflammation without raising blood pressure? Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen and naproxen or prescription drugs such as Celebrex, Mobic or Voltaren can raise blood pressure.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | May 29, 2008
I started taking Chantix and was surprised how quickly it cut my smoking in half. I continued with the Chantix until I finally quit. Depression was slowly creeping up on me, but nothing prepared me for what happened. One day, I woke up feeling as if I'd never be happy again. I have never felt such despair in my life. I have found it almost impossible to get help. I went to a mental-health facility, but they could do nothing unless I was suicidal and committed myself to their locked facility.
NEWS
July 6, 2011
News that a popular prescription medication that helps smokers kick the habit may carry an increased risk of heart attack and other cardiovascular problems shouldn't discourage tobacco users from trying to quit. The long-term health benefits of quitting are undisputed, while the dangers of continuing to puff away are both deadly and well-documented. If one method of stopping is found to be unsafe, smokers will still have a wide variety of other remedies to turn to. The study published Monday by Johns Hopkins researcher Dr. Sonal Singh found that Chantix, an anti-smoking drug that had sales of $755 million last year, carries a statistically significant increase in the risk for a heart attack or other serious heart problems in healthy, middle-aged smokers.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | July 4, 2011
A new study led by a Johns Hopkins researcher says the popular anti-smoking drug Chantix significantly increases the risk for a heart attack or other serious heart problem in healthy, middle-aged smokers. Dr. Sonal Singh, the study's lead author, is calling for warnings on the drug to be stronger than those currently required by the Food and Drug Administration. "People want to quit smoking to reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, but in this case they're taking a drug that increases the risk for the very problems they're trying to avoid," said Singh, an assistant professor of general internal medicine.
NEWS
By Joe and Teresa Graedon and Joe and Teresa Graedon,peoplespharmacy.com | September 29, 2008
My husband and I recently combined forces in a spectacular kitchen accident. He was heating water in a French press coffee pot in the microwave, and unknowingly heated it too much. As he picked up the pot and walked away from the microwave, the superheated water erupted into his face. In running to see what had happened, I slipped in the water, and hit my shoulder in the fall. I remembered reading about soy sauce for burns in one of your columns, and he quickly applied a liberal amount to his face.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | July 17, 2008
You have written columns suggesting use of sunscreens with microparticles of zinc or titanium. I read that some scientists are concerned about nanoparticles found in products such as sunscreen. These particles are so tiny, they could get into places in our bodies that larger particles can't. No one knows how dangerous this might be, but some experts suggest we exercise caution and avoid nanotechnology in products such as sunscreen. Shouldn't you warn people about the danger? The Environmental Working Group is a collaborative group of scientists that first raised a red flag about nanoparticles in sunscreens.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | May 29, 2008
I started taking Chantix and was surprised how quickly it cut my smoking in half. I continued with the Chantix until I finally quit. Depression was slowly creeping up on me, but nothing prepared me for what happened. One day, I woke up feeling as if I'd never be happy again. I have never felt such despair in my life. I have found it almost impossible to get help. I went to a mental-health facility, but they could do nothing unless I was suicidal and committed myself to their locked facility.
NEWS
By Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar and Ricardo Alonso-Zaldivar,LOS ANGELES TIMES | May 22, 2008
WASHINGTON - The Federal Aviation Administration banned pilots and air traffic controllers yesterday from using a popular anti-smoking drug after a study found that it had apparently contributed to auto accidents and other mishaps that posed risks to both users and others. The drug, marketed as Chantix, has been hailed as an innovative treatment to help smokers quit. But a study by a medical safety group - also issued yesterday - linked it to a variety of unusual and serious side effects, including loss of consciousness and seizures, and prompted the FAA to act, said spokesman Les Dorr.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | July 17, 2008
You have written columns suggesting use of sunscreens with microparticles of zinc or titanium. I read that some scientists are concerned about nanoparticles found in products such as sunscreen. These particles are so tiny, they could get into places in our bodies that larger particles can't. No one knows how dangerous this might be, but some experts suggest we exercise caution and avoid nanotechnology in products such as sunscreen. Shouldn't you warn people about the danger? The Environmental Working Group is a collaborative group of scientists that first raised a red flag about nanoparticles in sunscreens.
NEWS
By JOE AND TERESA GRAEDON | April 27, 2009
I've heard that blueberries have a beneficial effect on the brain. Can you tell me more about this? Is the research recent and credible? James Joseph, Ph.D., at Tufts University is a leading neuroscientist and expert on the effects of berries on brain function. He has done a number of studies in both aging rodents and humans demonstrating cognitive benefits from blueberries. We see this research as highly credible (Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry, Feb. 13, 2008). Joseph recommends frozen berries as an economical way to get the antioxidant potential of this fruit.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | January 31, 2008
My orthopedic doctor did not warn me that the anti-inflammatory drug he prescribed might raise my blood pressure. When it spiked to 172/92, I got scared. The doctor did not respond to my complaints, and a pharmacist said it was not a side effect of the medicine. When I stopped the NSAID, my blood pressure returned to normal (122/70). Can you relieve pain and inflammation without raising blood pressure? Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs like ibuprofen and naproxen or prescription drugs such as Celebrex, Mobic or Voltaren can raise blood pressure.
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