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By New York Times News Service | September 27, 1994
LONDON -- The Channel Tunnel is leaking, and as usual it is the investors in the project who are getting soaked.Shares in Eurotunnel, the company that operates the 31-mile undersea link between Britain and France, plunged yesterday after news reports over the weekend that water was seeping into the tunnel and not draining properly.After dropping nearly 10 percent early in the day, Eurotunnel units -- representing one share in each of the French and British divisions of the company -- recovered somewhat but still closed in London at a record low of 250 pence ($3.95)
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NEWS
November 27, 1996
IT SOUNDS LIKE a movie. A guard spots a truck smoldering aboard a flatbed train shooting into the tunnel at 90 miles per hour. No one to tell, no way to stop it. Eleven miles under the sea, the fire breaks out. Smoke jams the emergency brakes so the train cannot speed to safety. The train and truck drivers are trapped under the chalk bed beneath the stormy sea. It is 20 miles to England.Actually, 70 firefighters from France and England put the fire out. No one died in the Channel Tunnel's Nov. 18 accident.
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NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | May 1, 1994
FOLKESTONE, England -- The sprawling complexity of ramps, rails, roadways bridges and platforms at the British end of the Channel Tunnel awaits traffic in faintly ghostlike suspense under a thin fog rolling in from the sea.Queen Elizabeth II of Britain and President Francois Mitterrand of France will be here Friday to celebrate the opening of the "Chunnel" and the connection of Britain and Europe for the first time in an ice age.The moment will mark the...
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 25, 1996
CALAIS, France -- At the John Bull Pub inside the Cite Europe shopping mall, a racy British tabloid lies on the bar, egg and chips are on the menu and anxiety fills the air.Since the Channel Tunnel was virtually shut after a fire Nov. 18, the expected pre-Christmas rush has turned into a bust for the pub and more than 150 other stores and cinemas at the American-style mall perched at the tunnel's mouth."
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK FHC LhB | May 8, 1991
Rail tunnels have always been able to maintain a comfortable temperature because air circulates freely from one end of the passage to the other.But with the construction of the world's longest underwater tunnel, beneath the English Channel between Britain and France, come several unforeseen challenges in keeping things cool underground.In fact, engineers designing the project acknowledge that one of their initial surprises was that the tunnel needed to be air-conditioned at all."The discovery that the tunnels needed air-conditioning was made purely by the contractors checking some of the aerodynamics of the tunnel," said Robert Vance, director of the industrial and marine refrigeration group for the British subsidiary of York International Corp.
NEWS
May 8, 1994
Great state occasions, like ocean liners, are slow to turn, difficult to move. And so the opening of the Channel Tunnel went ahead as planned, more than one year delayed, with Queen Elizabeth II of England and President Francois Mitterrand of France dining and transiting together, although there was nothing to open. More work needs doing. Scheduled use by inter-city trains, shuttle trains bearing trucks and others bearing passenger cars will be phased in from spring to autumn.Typical of engineering marvels, the Chunnel comes in a year late with cost overruns of 100 percent.
NEWS
November 27, 1996
IT SOUNDS LIKE a movie. A guard spots a truck smoldering aboard a flatbed train shooting into the tunnel at 90 miles per hour. No one to tell, no way to stop it. Eleven miles under the sea, the fire breaks out. Smoke jams the emergency brakes so the train cannot speed to safety. The train and truck drivers are trapped under the chalk bed beneath the stormy sea. It is 20 miles to England.Actually, 70 firefighters from France and England put the fire out. No one died in the Channel Tunnel's Nov. 18 accident.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 2, 1990
FOLKESTONE, England -- At 11:21 a.m. yesterday, Robert Graham Fagg of Dover climbed through a 3-foot by 4-foot hole in a wall of chalk marl 130 feet below the seabed of the English Channel, shook the hand of Phillippe Cozette of Calais and shouted: "Vive la France."The English and French construction workers then hugged each other as a crowd of 100 onlookers cheered, celebrating the breakthrough of the channel tunnel -- known as the Chunnel -- which joined Britain to the European continent.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | November 25, 1996
CALAIS, France -- At the John Bull Pub inside the Cite Europe shopping mall, a racy British tabloid lies on the bar, egg and chips are on the menu and anxiety fills the air.Since the Channel Tunnel was virtually shut after a fire Nov. 18, the expected pre-Christmas rush has turned into a bust for the pub and more than 150 other stores and cinemas at the American-style mall perched at the tunnel's mouth."
FEATURES
By Alan Solomon and Alan Solomon,Chicago Tribune | April 30, 1995
Europe wants you. It wants to feed you, house you, transport you, entertain you and send you home richer for the experience )) and poorer for the pocketbook.There will be, as ever, much to do, see and buy this year across the Atlantic. Travel planners say that while some destinations, France and Germany among them, will remain expensive, there are some countries that will be relative bargains. The consensus list: Italy, Spain, Portugal, Great Britain, Greece and Turkey.Nations formerly in the Soviet bloc, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary, are expected to continue attracting growing numbers of tourists.
FEATURES
By Alan Solomon and Alan Solomon,Chicago Tribune | April 30, 1995
Europe wants you. It wants to feed you, house you, transport you, entertain you and send you home richer for the experience )) and poorer for the pocketbook.There will be, as ever, much to do, see and buy this year across the Atlantic. Travel planners say that while some destinations, France and Germany among them, will remain expensive, there are some countries that will be relative bargains. The consensus list: Italy, Spain, Portugal, Great Britain, Greece and Turkey.Nations formerly in the Soviet bloc, the Czech Republic, Slovakia and Hungary, are expected to continue attracting growing numbers of tourists.
BUSINESS
By New York Times News Service | September 27, 1994
LONDON -- The Channel Tunnel is leaking, and as usual it is the investors in the project who are getting soaked.Shares in Eurotunnel, the company that operates the 31-mile undersea link between Britain and France, plunged yesterday after news reports over the weekend that water was seeping into the tunnel and not draining properly.After dropping nearly 10 percent early in the day, Eurotunnel units -- representing one share in each of the French and British divisions of the company -- recovered somewhat but still closed in London at a record low of 250 pence ($3.95)
NEWS
May 8, 1994
Great state occasions, like ocean liners, are slow to turn, difficult to move. And so the opening of the Channel Tunnel went ahead as planned, more than one year delayed, with Queen Elizabeth II of England and President Francois Mitterrand of France dining and transiting together, although there was nothing to open. More work needs doing. Scheduled use by inter-city trains, shuttle trains bearing trucks and others bearing passenger cars will be phased in from spring to autumn.Typical of engineering marvels, the Chunnel comes in a year late with cost overruns of 100 percent.
NEWS
By Carl Schoettler and Carl Schoettler,London Bureau of The Sun | May 1, 1994
FOLKESTONE, England -- The sprawling complexity of ramps, rails, roadways bridges and platforms at the British end of the Channel Tunnel awaits traffic in faintly ghostlike suspense under a thin fog rolling in from the sea.Queen Elizabeth II of Britain and President Francois Mitterrand of France will be here Friday to celebrate the opening of the "Chunnel" and the connection of Britain and Europe for the first time in an ice age.The moment will mark the...
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK FHC LhB | May 8, 1991
Rail tunnels have always been able to maintain a comfortable temperature because air circulates freely from one end of the passage to the other.But with the construction of the world's longest underwater tunnel, beneath the English Channel between Britain and France, come several unforeseen challenges in keeping things cool underground.In fact, engineers designing the project acknowledge that one of their initial surprises was that the tunnel needed to be air-conditioned at all."The discovery that the tunnels needed air-conditioning was made purely by the contractors checking some of the aerodynamics of the tunnel," said Robert Vance, director of the industrial and marine refrigeration group for the British subsidiary of York International Corp.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | December 2, 1990
FOLKESTONE, England -- At 11:21 a.m. yesterday, Robert Graham Fagg of Dover climbed through a 3-foot by 4-foot hole in a wall of chalk marl 130 feet below the seabed of the English Channel, shook the hand of Phillippe Cozette of Calais and shouted: "Vive la France."The English and French construction workers then hugged each other as a crowd of 100 onlookers cheered, celebrating the breakthrough of the channel tunnel -- known as the Chunnel -- which joined Britain to the European continent.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | October 31, 1990
LONDON -- England lost its treasured island status yesterday as the two ends of an underwater tunnel linking it with Europe were joined beneath the middle of the English Channel.English and French workers made the historic breakthrough, 14 miles from the coastal port of Folkestone, 10 miles from the beaches of the Pas de Calais and 130 feet below the seabed of the waters that have separated them since England drifted away from the continental landmass.First direct contact was through a tiny laser-guided probe to make sure the two ends of the tunnel were correctly aligned.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service | February 27, 1994
Travelers leaving British airports will pay a departure tax starting in October.For people flying within Britain and the European Union the tax will be about $7.50 at current exchange rates. (On round trips to and from the same airport within Britain, the tax will be levied only once.) For passengers to all other destinations, including the United States, the tax will be $15. Passengers who just change planes in Britain are exempted from the tax.The tax does not apply to trains, boats or the Channel tunnel.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,London Bureau of The Sun | October 31, 1990
LONDON -- England lost its treasured island status yesterday as the two ends of an underwater tunnel linking it with Europe were joined beneath the middle of the English Channel.English and French workers made the historic breakthrough, 14 miles from the coastal port of Folkestone, 10 miles from the beaches of the Pas de Calais and 130 feet below the seabed of the waters that have separated them since England drifted away from the continental landmass.First direct contact was through a tiny laser-guided probe to make sure the two ends of the tunnel were correctly aligned.
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