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Chandra Levy

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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 23, 2002
WASHINGTON - A man walking his dog in heavily wooded parkland yesterday came upon the remains of Chandra Levy, police said, ending a yearlong hunt for the former government intern but failing to resolve the mystery surrounding her death. Levy's remains were found scattered on a steep hill in Rock Creek Park at 9:30 a.m., when a man hunting for turtles was led by his dog to a skull obscured by leaves and dirt. Early yesterday evening, District Police Chief Charles H. Ramsey announced that medical examiners had confirmed the identity of the remains by comparing them with Levy's dental records.
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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 23, 2002
WASHINGTON - A man walking his dog in heavily wooded parkland yesterday came upon the remains of Chandra Levy, police said, ending a yearlong hunt for the former government intern but failing to resolve the mystery surrounding her death. Levy's remains were found scattered on a steep hill in Rock Creek Park at 9:30 a.m., when a man hunting for turtles was led by his dog to a skull obscured by leaves and dirt. Early yesterday evening, District Police Chief Charles H. Ramsey announced that medical examiners had confirmed the identity of the remains by comparing them with Levy's dental records.
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NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 26, 2001
WASHINGTON - It should come as no surprise that the Dalai Lama has instructed his monks to pray for Chandra Levy's safe return or that her parents have received sympathetic e-mails from as far as England and Germany. After all, the Washington intern who vanished this month has been the focus of a publicity blitz rarely seen in missing-persons cases. But it is not just a sophisticated media campaign that has sent the story of the missing graduate student around the globe. It is her relationship with the congressman who represents her central California district, whom police questioned soon after she disappeared from her Northwest Washington neighborhood.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2001
California Gov. Gray Davis broke his long silence over the conduct of Rep. Gary A. Condit yesterday, joining the chorus of criticism over the lawmaker's seeming lack of candor since the disappearance of former intern Chandra Levy. "I'm disheartened that Congressman Condit did not speak out more quickly or more fully," Davis said of his political ally. But he did not urge Condit to resign or try to dissuade him from seeking re-election, as have other Democrats. "While I get no joy out of this whatsoever, I just think it is important that Gary Condit be as forthcoming as possible, do everything humanly possible, to help law enforcement identify the location of Chandra Levy," Davis said at a news conference.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 25, 2001
WASHINGTON - Roger Chiang trudged toward the Dupont Circle Metro station at dawn that frigid winter morning and saw only TV trucks and darkness. Clutching a stack of pictures of his missing sister, desperate to find her, he realized he was entering a new and lonely landscape. Around him, as Chiang handed the leaflets to distracted commuters, local reporters awaiting their live shots jostled for 30-second interviews. "I felt overwhelmed," he recalls. "At that moment, I got a real deep sense that I had nothing to control here.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 22, 2001
WASHINGTON - The parents of a young woman who has been missing for seven weeks pressed yesterday for a more thorough police examination of her relationship with a California congressman in a case that suddenly has overtaken politics as the hottest topic in the nation's capital. Robert and Susan Levy, of Modesto, Calif., said through their attorney that they think police should investigate the disappearance of their daughter, Chandra Levy, as a criminal matter rather than as a missing person.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 28, 2001
California Gov. Gray Davis broke his long silence over the conduct of Rep. Gary A. Condit yesterday, joining the chorus of criticism over the lawmaker's seeming lack of candor since the disappearance of former intern Chandra Levy. "I'm disheartened that Congressman Condit did not speak out more quickly or more fully," Davis said of his political ally. But he did not urge Condit to resign or try to dissuade him from seeking re-election, as have other Democrats. "While I get no joy out of this whatsoever, I just think it is important that Gary Condit be as forthcoming as possible, do everything humanly possible, to help law enforcement identify the location of Chandra Levy," Davis said at a news conference.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | August 24, 2001
Millions of Americans tuned in to ABC-TV last night to watch an interview with a beleaguered American politician. Instead, they witnessed a clinic in tap dancing. Again and again, correspondent Connie Chung pushed embattled California Rep. Gary A. Condit about whether he had been romantically involved with Chandra Levy, the young former federal intern who has been missing for more than 100 days. In one typical exchange, Chung interrupted Condit to ask about adultery, like a character in a Nathaniel Hawthorne short story: "Would you like to tell the truth about the relationship with her?"
NEWS
By Robert H. Deluty | August 10, 2001
AN ORIOLE batter singles to right field. He tries to steal second, but is thrown out. The next batter hits a home run. The radio announcer remarks that if the first batter had not been caught stealing, the Orioles would have two runs instead of just one. A professional golfer shoots a double bogey on the second hole on the final day of a tournament. He goes on to lose the match by just one stroke. The next day, a columnist writes that, were it not for that early double bogey, he would have won the match.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 24, 2001
WASHINGTON - Breaking his self-imposed public silence, Rep. Gary A. Condit refused last night to say whether he had an affair with Chandra Levy but insisted that he has no knowledge of the whereabouts of the 24-year-old former intern, who vanished nearly four months ago. In an interview with ABC-TV's Connie Chung, the California Democrat described a "close" five-month friendship with Levy, but repeatedly declined to describe the nature of their relationship...
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | August 24, 2001
WASHINGTON - Breaking his self-imposed public silence, Rep. Gary A. Condit refused last night to say whether he had an affair with Chandra Levy but insisted that he has no knowledge of the whereabouts of the 24-year-old former intern, who vanished nearly four months ago. In an interview with ABC-TV's Connie Chung, the California Democrat described a "close" five-month friendship with Levy, but repeatedly declined to describe the nature of their relationship...
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN TELEVISION WRITER | August 24, 2001
Millions of Americans tuned in to ABC-TV last night to watch an interview with a beleaguered American politician. Instead, they witnessed a clinic in tap dancing. Again and again, correspondent Connie Chung pushed embattled California Rep. Gary A. Condit about whether he had been romantically involved with Chandra Levy, the young former federal intern who has been missing for more than 100 days. In one typical exchange, Chung interrupted Condit to ask about adultery, like a character in a Nathaniel Hawthorne short story: "Would you like to tell the truth about the relationship with her?"
NEWS
By Robert H. Deluty | August 10, 2001
AN ORIOLE batter singles to right field. He tries to steal second, but is thrown out. The next batter hits a home run. The radio announcer remarks that if the first batter had not been caught stealing, the Orioles would have two runs instead of just one. A professional golfer shoots a double bogey on the second hole on the final day of a tournament. He goes on to lose the match by just one stroke. The next day, a columnist writes that, were it not for that early double bogey, he would have won the match.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 25, 2001
WASHINGTON - Roger Chiang trudged toward the Dupont Circle Metro station at dawn that frigid winter morning and saw only TV trucks and darkness. Clutching a stack of pictures of his missing sister, desperate to find her, he realized he was entering a new and lonely landscape. Around him, as Chiang handed the leaflets to distracted commuters, local reporters awaiting their live shots jostled for 30-second interviews. "I felt overwhelmed," he recalls. "At that moment, I got a real deep sense that I had nothing to control here.
NEWS
By Mona Charen | July 24, 2001
WASHINGTON - I'm a little confused. Didn't we all agree that "everyone lies about sex"? So Gary Condit did the right thing, didn't he, in denying a sexual relationship with Chandra Levy for nearly 10 weeks and keeping the police in the dark? He was protecting his family, as any solid citizen would do, right? We don't crucify people for that. The fullest expression of post-Clintonian morality came from one of Mr. Condit's constituents. Asked if he thought Mr. Condit might have had a role in Ms. Levy's disappearance, he said: "That's his personal life.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - Police interrogated California Democratic Rep. Gary A. Condit three times about the disappearance of former federal intern Chandra Levy. They searched his one-bedroom condo for three hours in the dead of night. They want him to take a lie detector test. They have asked for a DNA sample. "Are police treating him like a suspect? Sure," says David Schertler, a former head of the U.S. attorney's homicide unit in Washington. "There's no question that whether or not you classify him as a suspect, he is."
NEWS
By Mona Charen | July 24, 2001
WASHINGTON - I'm a little confused. Didn't we all agree that "everyone lies about sex"? So Gary Condit did the right thing, didn't he, in denying a sexual relationship with Chandra Levy for nearly 10 weeks and keeping the police in the dark? He was protecting his family, as any solid citizen would do, right? We don't crucify people for that. The fullest expression of post-Clintonian morality came from one of Mr. Condit's constituents. Asked if he thought Mr. Condit might have had a role in Ms. Levy's disappearance, he said: "That's his personal life.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | July 12, 2001
WASHINGTON - Police interrogated California Democratic Rep. Gary A. Condit three times about the disappearance of former federal intern Chandra Levy. They searched his one-bedroom condo for three hours in the dead of night. They want him to take a lie detector test. They have asked for a DNA sample. "Are police treating him like a suspect? Sure," says David Schertler, a former head of the U.S. attorney's homicide unit in Washington. "There's no question that whether or not you classify him as a suspect, he is."
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | June 22, 2001
WASHINGTON - The parents of a young woman who has been missing for seven weeks pressed yesterday for a more thorough police examination of her relationship with a California congressman in a case that suddenly has overtaken politics as the hottest topic in the nation's capital. Robert and Susan Levy, of Modesto, Calif., said through their attorney that they think police should investigate the disappearance of their daughter, Chandra Levy, as a criminal matter rather than as a missing person.
NEWS
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 26, 2001
WASHINGTON - It should come as no surprise that the Dalai Lama has instructed his monks to pray for Chandra Levy's safe return or that her parents have received sympathetic e-mails from as far as England and Germany. After all, the Washington intern who vanished this month has been the focus of a publicity blitz rarely seen in missing-persons cases. But it is not just a sophisticated media campaign that has sent the story of the missing graduate student around the globe. It is her relationship with the congressman who represents her central California district, whom police questioned soon after she disappeared from her Northwest Washington neighborhood.
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