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By Anita Gold and Anita Gold,Chicago Tribune | October 11, 1992
Q: Where can I get an authentic-looking reproduction of an pTC Early American candle chandelier fitted with enough electrified candles and flame-shaped bulbs to light a full-size dining room properly?A:Write to the Workshops of David T. Smith, 3600 Shawhan Road, Morrow, Ohio 45152; (513) 932-2472, enclosing $3.50 for a catalog of his furniture and chandeliers or $19.95 for a product-inventory videotape.Q: How can I find out the value of an old rowing machine?A: Collector Kevin Mark appraises pre-1960 exercise equipment.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 16, 2014
We had an enjoyable evening at French Kitchen, the new restaurant inside the Lord Baltimore Hotel. It was enjoyable despite, or maybe because of how surreal it was to dine in such a large imposing space with only a few other tables filled. Right now, the reason to go is for the small menu of classic French bistro fare, which a young kitchen is preparing with verve and authority. The chef here is Jordan Miller, who has clever notions about how to freshen up traditional French cuisine.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2010
The famous 1-ton chandelier appearing in "The Phantom of the Opera" lumbers slowly toward the stage of the Hippodrome Theatre, looking for all the world like a flying wedding cake. Actually, it looks like a wedding cake that has been frosted on just one side, since the back is noticably lacking the white glass dollops and gilted doodads adorning the front. The chandelier lists first to the left and then to the right, before settling on the four metal feet protruding from the bottom.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2012
GrandView, a condominium highrise in the heart of Annapolis Towne Centre, certainly lives up to its name, especially in the 12th-floor penthouse of Barry and Olga Scher. In this three-bedroom, 3½-bath unit with a den, living room, dining room, open kitchen and two balconies, the couple marvels at the views of the Bay Bridge and the sailboats, cruise and cargo ships that pass beneath it daily. Former residents of Washington's Georgetown/Palisades neighborhood, the Schers, tired of climbing the stairs in their four-story home, set about searching the area for the perfect condo, even checking out the Capital's infamous Watergate complex.
FEATURES
By Lita Solis-Cohen | December 2, 1990
On Oct. 30, auctioneer Brian Cole took bids on an 18-light chandelier, not, as so often happens these days, off the chandelier, which is where auctioneers find those fictitious numbers they pull out of the air to support the minimum acceptable price when there are no bids in the auction room.The 5-foot-wide, 200-pound chandelier sold for a whopping $1,155,000, double its high estimate, at Christie's, to become the sixth lot of silver to sell for more than $1 million. (The record stands at $1.98 million, paid at Christie's in April for an Italian table fountain circa 1680.
FEATURES
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,Sun Staff Writer | February 23, 1994
Baltimore's new performing arts center may turn out to be an "urban chandelier," featuring crystalline glass shapes set against white marble and metal, and changing light shows touting the latest production.Or it may look like a pair of elongated metallic space ships, sewn together at the roof and bulging with the "Arts of the 21st Century."How about a high-tech mini-version of New York's Times Square, featuring oversized marquees and the country's first all-glass theaters? Or a more traditional building clad in Mount Vernon-compatible stone and brick, with a block-long lobby and theaters reminiscent of the best on Broadway?
ENTERTAINMENT
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | August 8, 2004
Elisabeth Farwell is shedding some light on one of the major characters in Andrew Lloyd Webber's The Phantom of the Opera. Although the show is a musical, this character doesn't sing, dance or even speak. It is, however, a highly animate object - the famous chandelier, which rises over the audience in the first scene, then comes crashing down just before intermission. As the advance stage manager of Phantom, which begins performances at the Hippodrome Theatre Wednesday, Farwell oversees the arrival and installation of the show - with its gilded proscenium arch, hundreds of costumes, life-sized model elephant and mechanized boat.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2011
Chandeliers were the first thing Joe Niermann designed. And it was five years before he sold one. Now the bejeweled iron and crystal silhouettes are his signature. "I don't really care for the crystals, one way or the other," said Niermann, though millions of them are stored in large paint buckets in the Millersville strip mall he converted into the Niermann Weeks company factory. "I want the design to be strong enough so that it doesn't need crystals. " But it is the crystals — from tiny, man-made beads imported from the Czech Republic to the fist-sized rock crystals found in nature — that identify Niermann's light fixtures, some as small as a wall sconce and others 6 feet tall and 6 feet across and weighing 300 pounds.
BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella and Lorraine Mirabella,SUN STAFF | August 8, 1999
Home Depot Inc. is going upscale -- and offering to do it for you.In a departure from its stripped-down warehouses that have all but defined the do-it-yourself market, the home improvement giant is rolling out a new division that does away with lumber piled to the rafters, PVC pipe by the foot and salespeople in utilitarian orange aprons.At the company's new Expo Design Centers, such as one that opened last month in Fairfax, Va., shoppers may instead feel transported into the glossy pages of a home decor magazine.
NEWS
By Gilbert A. Lewthwaite and Gilbert A. Lewthwaite,Washington Bureau | November 1, 1993
WASHINGTON -- It has cast a glow on Baltimore burlesque shows, shone down upon Methodist worshipers, and thrown light on the nation's lawmakers. But now the chandelier with such a radiant past has a distinctly dim future.Its 148 lamps and 14,500 crystals that first twinkled in the long-gone Maryland Theater on West Franklin Street are out of place in the Small Rotunda of the Senate wing of the august U.S. Capitol, according to no less an authority than George White, architect of the Capitol.
CLASSIFIED
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | September 1, 2012
Maura Iacoboni always admired her friend's home, a two-story Colonial-style structure in Timonium in Baltimore County. Little wonder, then, that when the home was put on the market earlier this year, she jumped on it. "It always looked happy to me; it feels like home," she said, having moved in with her husband, three of her four sons and two dogs this past April. "It is a great family house. I think the boys and their friends always knew this, that they can always come here to hang out. " Indeed there is hangout room and much more in the 3,500-square-foot home built in 1978 on a hilly half-acre lot with a backyard full of crape myrtles.
FEATURES
By Susan Reimer, The Baltimore Sun | December 18, 2011
Chandeliers were the first thing Joe Niermann designed. And it was five years before he sold one. Now the bejeweled iron and crystal silhouettes are his signature. "I don't really care for the crystals, one way or the other," said Niermann, though millions of them are stored in large paint buckets in the Millersville strip mall he converted into the Niermann Weeks company factory. "I want the design to be strong enough so that it doesn't need crystals. " But it is the crystals — from tiny, man-made beads imported from the Czech Republic to the fist-sized rock crystals found in nature — that identify Niermann's light fixtures, some as small as a wall sconce and others 6 feet tall and 6 feet across and weighing 300 pounds.
FEATURES
By Marie Marciano Gullard, Special to The Baltimore Sun | July 14, 2011
No one who walks into Jeri and Jesse Hannon's townhouse in Mays Chapel North is likely to forget the dining room chandelier. Hanging from a 10-foot-high carved ceiling medallion, this magnificent fixture, fashioned of cut crystal and looking much like a carved ice sculpture, commands the space around it. The elegance of the chandelier almost solely defines Jeri Hannon's decorating scheme in the home she and her husband have occupied for the past...
NEWS
Jacques Kelly | February 25, 2011
Time, fashion and finances were not kind to a fabled West Baltimore mansion, a winter palace built by 19th-century railroad builder and engineer Thomas deKay Winans. He gave his residence a curious name, Alexandroffsky. It was every bit a walled Xanadu that caused Baltimoreans to gasp and gossip until the day the wreckers flattened it. The mansion's site is now part of the University of Maryland biotech park. The story behind Alexandroffsky is a good tale, well-documented by Baltimore County historian John McGrain.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | April 9, 2010
The famous 1-ton chandelier appearing in "The Phantom of the Opera" lumbers slowly toward the stage of the Hippodrome Theatre, looking for all the world like a flying wedding cake. Actually, it looks like a wedding cake that has been frosted on just one side, since the back is noticably lacking the white glass dollops and gilted doodads adorning the front. The chandelier lists first to the left and then to the right, before settling on the four metal feet protruding from the bottom.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Karen Nitkin and Karen Nitkin,Special to the Sun | May 15, 2008
George's, situated in the gorgeous Peabody Court Hotel, has one of Baltimore's best addresses, in Mount Vernon Square and within walking distance of the city's best-known cultural attractions. The historic hotel does justice to the location, practically purring with old-world charm, from its wood floors to its royal-purple walls and the stunning chandelier in the lobby. "Quiet elegance" are the key words of the hotel and its restaurant. The restaurant staff is attentive, but practically tiptoes across the floors, and leans in to take your order, speaking in close to a whisper in an apparent attempt to keep the room's ambient noise level as low as possible.
NEWS
By Michael Walsh and By Michael Walsh,Universal Press Syndicate | May 12, 2002
Pitched, arched, domed, coffered, trussed or beamed, a shapely ceiling can be a refreshing -- and impressive -- alternative to a flat and featureless overhead surface. If you're planning a new home or a major remodel of an old one, incorporating an "articulated" ceiling can add high-altitude drama and substantial architectural interest. But there are several cosmetic ceiling treatment options that require few if any structural changes. Even these seemingly minor improvements can exert a powerful visual influence on a room, and at a relatively low cost.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | July 22, 2007
Food *** (3 stars) Service *** (3 stars) Atmosphere *** (3 stars) After 11 years in a basement a few blocks south, Minato has moved up into the light. That's how it seems, anyway, if you're seated at one of the tables in the big storefront window of what once was the Belvedere Florist. On a summer evening, light still streams in through most of dinner. There's a glittery retro chandelier. Light is also provided by the huge rainbow wave fixture, almost a sculpture, overhead. The fluorescent lemon-lime chairs are so bright they practically light up the place by themselves.
BUSINESS
By The Boston Globe | February 24, 2008
A thousand bucks, or even $500, can go a long way toward transforming a room - and your attitude toward your home. Whether they're contemporary lamp shades or new doors, upgrades make a difference. Here are a few suggestions from interior designers: Reframe art work. `'Do five to 10 pieces," says Ken Dietz, principal designer, Dietz & Associates, Jamaica Plain, Mass. `'Get coordinating frames and create a gallery wall." Change the bathroom vanity. Consider a vessel sink. "It can be a dramatic change without too much trouble," says Edwina Drummond Boose, owner of Edwina Drummond Interiors, Waltham, Mass.
SPORTS
By PETER SCHMUCK | September 30, 2007
News item: The Orioles close out the regular season today against the New York Yankees at Oriole Park, completing their 10th consecutive losing season. Now, the debate begins. Should they break open the vault and try to fill some of the gaping holes in the roster through free agency or concentrate on a long-term player development approach to revive the franchise? My take: I'm pretty sure Andy MacPhail will take the slow boat to contention, but that's not going to go over very well with the fans - or what's left of them.
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