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By Alan J. Craver and Alan J. Craver,Sun Staff Writer | March 6, 1994
Don't let Nancy Haslinger's old-style title fool you: She deals with some very contemporary issues -- divorce, custody and juvenile crime.The 46-year-old Columbia lawyer is Howard County's new master in chancery, and the first woman to hold a judicial position in Howard Circuit Court.Ms. Haslinger was sworn in last month as one of two county masters in chancery, a title that dates back several hundred years to the days when the British monarchy addressed such family matters as divorces and adoptions.
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NEWS
By a Baltimore Sun staff writer | May 7, 2009
Lucy A. Garvey, the first woman to serve as an assistant state's attorney in Baltimore and who became the first woman appointed to the post of master of chancery for what is now the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, died Sunday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. She was 86. Lucy Ann Garvey, the daughter of Irish immigrants from County Clare, was born in Baltimore and raised on South Morley Street in Irvington. Master Garvey was a 1940 honors graduate of Western High School, where she was awarded the Peabody Award.
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NEWS
By a Baltimore Sun staff writer | May 7, 2009
Lucy A. Garvey, the first woman to serve as an assistant state's attorney in Baltimore and who became the first woman appointed to the post of master of chancery for what is now the Circuit Court for Baltimore City, died Sunday of cancer at Stella Maris Hospice in Timonium. She was 86. Lucy Ann Garvey, the daughter of Irish immigrants from County Clare, was born in Baltimore and raised on South Morley Street in Irvington. Master Garvey was a 1940 honors graduate of Western High School, where she was awarded the Peabody Award.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | November 9, 2006
NEW YORK -- A top investor in Mills Corp., the developer behind the stalled $2 billion New Jersey mall project known as Meadowlands Xanadu, sued to force the company to hold its annual meeting and again warned it not to pursue a sale. The Delaware suit was filed by Gazit-Globe Ltd., Israel's largest real estate investment company, which recently increased its stake in Mills to 9.7 percent. Gazit-Globe said in a regulatory filing that it wants the meeting because management has ignored Gazit's proposal to invest as much as $1.2 billion in the company.
BUSINESS
November 24, 1993
Ex-Dart president sues companyDart Group Corp., its chairman Herbert Haft and his son Ronald Haft, and other directors have been sued by Robert Haft, another Haft son and the company's former president, according to information filed with Delaware Chancery Court.The filing made Tuesday said Robert Haft charges the defendants with breech of fiduciary duty, waste of corporate assets, breech of contract, and dilution of shareholder voting rights.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | April 5, 2006
It is relatively new, cost $570,000 to start up, additional money to correct -- and Howard County School employees say it doesn't work. The Student Management System, provided by Burnaby, British Columbia-based Chancery Software Ltd., was suppose to be a faster, more efficient way for schools to record grades and other pertinent achievement data. But because of program glitches, high school report cards have been delayed and employees have spent additional hours working to rectify the problems, resulting in overtime.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2003
Clarke D. Bowers never expected a utopia when he and his family moved to Baltimore's Guilford neighborhood five years ago. He knew crime might be an issue, the snowplows less than speedy. But having to wait 13 months for city crews to unclog underground municipal storm drains that repeatedly caused his basement to flood? He didn't expect that, either. "I just want them to come clean it out," Bowers, a 42-year- old software engineer who works out of his Tudor-style home on Chancery Square, said Wednesday.
FEATURES
By James Warren and James Warren,Chicago Tribune | September 17, 1995
Whether it's a blind date or a novel, we'd all agree that opening lines are pretty important.So it's intriguing to pick up the 25th anniversary, Sept.-Oct. issue of the trade publication Poets & Writers and find one novelist, Rosellen Brown, offering her 25 favorites from novels, either at or near their beginning.The author of "Before and After" writes that the lines "that would make me want to be a writer if I weren't one already" include:* "A desperate foolishness. The crops failed. I sold my children."
BUSINESS
September 19, 1995
State eases standard on gas sold in winterMaryland has passed an emergency regulation to ease the amount of oxygen required in gasoline sold in Maryland, Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein said yesterday.The regulation, which lifts a requirement for cleaner-burning gasoline in Maryland during the winter months, is expected to result in lower shipping and blending costs for the state's 3,000 gasoline distributors and retailers.The savings, a penny or two per gallon, may be passed on to consumers, Mr. Goldstein said.
BUSINESS
By Bloomberg News | November 9, 2006
NEW YORK -- A top investor in Mills Corp., the developer behind the stalled $2 billion New Jersey mall project known as Meadowlands Xanadu, sued to force the company to hold its annual meeting and again warned it not to pursue a sale. The Delaware suit was filed by Gazit-Globe Ltd., Israel's largest real estate investment company, which recently increased its stake in Mills to 9.7 percent. Gazit-Globe said in a regulatory filing that it wants the meeting because management has ignored Gazit's proposal to invest as much as $1.2 billion in the company.
NEWS
By JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV and JOHN-JOHN WILLIAMS IV,SUN REPORTER | April 5, 2006
It is relatively new, cost $570,000 to start up, additional money to correct -- and Howard County School employees say it doesn't work. The Student Management System, provided by Burnaby, British Columbia-based Chancery Software Ltd., was suppose to be a faster, more efficient way for schools to record grades and other pertinent achievement data. But because of program glitches, high school report cards have been delayed and employees have spent additional hours working to rectify the problems, resulting in overtime.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | December 10, 2004
Annapolis lore has it that when victorious Gen. George Washington resigned his commission here one December day in 1783, he cut through a certain alley from the State House to Mann's, his hotel, and then marked the occasion with friends at the popular Coffee House. Mann's and the Coffee House are long gone, but the alley that the nation's first president most likely took, Chancery Lane, is still a well-walked, sloping footpath between Annapolis' State Circle and Main Street. Not all the dozen or so named alleys in Annapolis glow with grand moments in American history.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert and Scott Calvert,SUN STAFF | June 27, 2003
Clarke D. Bowers never expected a utopia when he and his family moved to Baltimore's Guilford neighborhood five years ago. He knew crime might be an issue, the snowplows less than speedy. But having to wait 13 months for city crews to unclog underground municipal storm drains that repeatedly caused his basement to flood? He didn't expect that, either. "I just want them to come clean it out," Bowers, a 42-year- old software engineer who works out of his Tudor-style home on Chancery Square, said Wednesday.
NEWS
By Maureen Milford and Maureen Milford,NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | March 11, 2001
WILMINGTON, Del. - When corporate raider T. Boone Pickens made a hostile bid for Newmont Mining Corp. during the takeover frenzy of the late 1980s, the battle ended up in Delaware's Dickensian-sounding Court of Chancery. But the day the Texas deal maker showed up for a hearing, the proceedings had to be moved to a courtroom in the federal building. Chancery - the most important state court in the country when it comes to corporate law - could not fit all the arbitrageurs, members of the news media and spectators into one of its cozy courtrooms in the 1916 Daniel L. Herrmann Courthouse on Rodney Square.
TOPIC
By SCOTT SHANE | May 7, 2000
LAWYERS ARE supposed to remove the emotions from messy human disputes so they can be settled by the dispassionate rule of law. Except that the lawyers come with their own emotions. And like firefighting buffs who turn out to be secret arsonists, those whose job is to help resolve disagreements sometimes prolong and expand them. That seems to be the unfortunate case with Maryland's tobacco lawsuit. In a nutshell: The state lawyer who hired the lawyer to sue the tobacco companies later sued the lawyer he hired in a fee dispute, hiring another lawyer to represent him. Also, the lawyer the state lawyer hired had hired another lawyer who knew tobacco law, but who later sued the lawyer who hired him for a bigger share of the fee. And the lawyer the state lawyer hired naturally had to hire another lawyer to defend against the lawsuits of the tobacco-expert lawyer and the state lawyer.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 4, 1997
MOSCOW -- For more than a decade, the chancery building of the U.S. Embassy in Moscow -- red brick, empty and forlorn -- was a historical landmark, a cautionary monument to Cold War espionage.Seven years of construction came to a halt in 1985. The chancery, or embassy office building, was never occupied. Shamefaced U.S. officials belatedly discovered tens of thousands of microscopic listening devices embedded in its concrete walls and sealed off the entire structure.Now, the eight-story building in the center of the walled-off embassy complex is again wrapped in scaffolding and hums with hammering noises as crews try to make at least some of it fit for post-Cold-War diplomacy.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | May 3, 1993
Sherwood Gardens was just beginning to fill up with the annual crowd of tulip fanciers when 20 more visitors led by a man with a portable microphone crossed its fescue-rich lawns.Those other visitors were taking a three-hour walking tour of Guilford, the well-clipped North Baltimore neighborhood renowned for five-figure bills from house painters and tax assessors.James F. Waesche, Fenchurch Road resident, writer and local historian, led the tour sponsored by the Baltimore Chapter of the American Institute of Architects and the Maryland Institute College of Art.The tour is one of several that focus on the Baltimore neighborhoods designed by the legendary Olmsted Brothers, landscape architects who conceived the tree-studded and winding streets of Roland Park, Homeland, Guilford and Dundalk.
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | July 19, 1996
A veteran Annapolis trial lawyer best known for representing John Frederick Thanos was appointed yesterday as a master in chancery in Anne Arundel County Circuit Court to preside over certain civil cases.James D. McCarthy Jr., a former prosecutor, civil lawyer and an ** assistant public defender for 17 years, was selected yesterday by the county's nine Circuit judges.McCarthy was chosen from a list of 41 lawyers who applied for the vacancy created July 9 when Nancy Davis-Loomis was appointed to the District Court bench, said Robert Wallace, court administrator.
BUSINESS
September 19, 1995
State eases standard on gas sold in winterMaryland has passed an emergency regulation to ease the amount of oxygen required in gasoline sold in Maryland, Comptroller Louis L. Goldstein said yesterday.The regulation, which lifts a requirement for cleaner-burning gasoline in Maryland during the winter months, is expected to result in lower shipping and blending costs for the state's 3,000 gasoline distributors and retailers.The savings, a penny or two per gallon, may be passed on to consumers, Mr. Goldstein said.
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