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NEWS
By Knight Ridder News Service | August 31, 1992
MANAGUA -- A U.S. Senate panel's report on Nicaragua paints a picture of a government riddled with nepotism that doles out fat loans to friends without expecting repayment.The report says President Violeta Chamorro's top aide may be profiteering off U.S. donations, buying votes in the Nicaraguan Congress and backing a Sandinista army chief who is stashing millions in bank accounts in Canada.The broad allegations, often supported by unnamed sources or based on press accounts, begin with a demand by the Republican staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee for stricter oversight of U.S. aid to Nicaragua.
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NEWS
October 17, 1996
NICARAGUA'S fragile democracy is losing its political center as President Violeta Chamorro's six-year term draws to an end. In Sunday's elections, the only two viable candidates are former Sandinista leader Daniel Ortega on the far left and former Contra sympathizer Arnoldo Aleman on the far right. Only in the event of a runoff would these bitter rivals be tempted to appeal to Mrs. Chamorro's dwindling number of allies.While it is fashionable within the elite that always runs Nicaragua to denigrate Mrs. Chamorro as a weak and feckless president, these complaints come mainly from those on the political extremes she refused to placate.
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NEWS
By JOHN M. McCLINTOCK | August 29, 1993
In 1990, Violeta Chamorro floated over bloody Nicaragua, pronounced it healed and was elected president.She had appeared as if from heaven -- a still beautiful grandmother, almost invariably dressed in white, who traveled the rutted dirt roads of that heavily Catholic country in a vehicle designed to resemble the "pope mobile."The non-charismatic Mrs. Chamorro even managed a semblance that tight, benign smile peculiar to Pope John Paul II. And for a while, the 64-year-old newspaper publisher was the saintly embodiment of the nation's desire to bind its wounds.
FEATURES
By Edward Dufner and Edward Dufner,DALLAS MORNING NEWS | January 21, 1996
Seldom have so many traveled so far to see so much.In the vast reaches of the western Pacific, Madison Avenue and Hollywood have collided with a tropical paradise and nearly 500 years of colonial history.The result looks like Main Street, U.S.A. -- but with shimmering turquoise lagoons, stunning cliffs and luxuriant jungles.And like Hawaii -- with Spanish architecture.And like a living museum of Americans' World War II valor -- with sidewalks full of Japanese tourists."If you're looking for something different, if you're looking for something unspoiled, if you're a person who really wants to get away from it all it's oh, so nice to get off that fast track every so often to go someplace that beautiful," says Sandra Palmer, spokeswoman for the Guam Liaison Office in Washington.
NEWS
By Peter Osterlund and Peter Osterlund,Washington Bureau of The Sun | April 17, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Nicaraguan President Violeta Chamorro appealed to Congress yesterday for "steadfast financial assistance" as her country attempts the "almost impossible" task of building democracy amid the ruin of civil war and economic despair."
NEWS
October 17, 1996
NICARAGUA'S fragile democracy is losing its political center as President Violeta Chamorro's six-year term draws to an end. In Sunday's elections, the only two viable candidates are former Sandinista leader Daniel Ortega on the far left and former Contra sympathizer Arnoldo Aleman on the far right. Only in the event of a runoff would these bitter rivals be tempted to appeal to Mrs. Chamorro's dwindling number of allies.While it is fashionable within the elite that always runs Nicaragua to denigrate Mrs. Chamorro as a weak and feckless president, these complaints come mainly from those on the political extremes she refused to placate.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 7, 1993
Bill threatens the Bosnian Serbs with air strikes so often, even he doesn't take it seriously.President Chamorro will boot General Ortega from command of Nicaragua's army, so she says.What can you do with a league that considers Green Bay, Wis., a major league town?
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 22, 1991
DOES ANYONE remember Nicaragua? Where U.S.-backe rebels that former President Reagan likened to our Founding Fathers were fighting communism? "Our side" won, but the average Nicaraguan is no better off, and U.S. indifference is partly to blame.That is what prompted President Violeta Barrios de Chamorro to come to the U.S. [last] week on her first visit since being elected in 1990 -- to remind President Bush and Congress that her country is still desperate for U.S. aid. But does anyone remember Mrs. Chamorro?
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 4, 1992
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- From the rugged Nicaraguan mountains to the palace of President Violeta Chamorro, one "yanqui" name is familiar to guerrillas and government leaders alike: Jesse Helms, the Republican senator from North Carolina.In recent months, Mr. Helms has assumed extraordinary sway in this struggling Third World country, which in the past 20 years has seen two bloody civil wars, earthquakes, tidal waves and a hurricane.Because of a procedural quirk that allows a single senator to place an informal hold on foreign aid, Mr. Helms by himself has managed to freeze $116 million desperately needed by Nicaragua.
NEWS
February 24, 1991
Nicaragua has little to show for a year of democratically elected government dedicated to reconciliation. Few Nicaraguans are reconciled.Inflation is running at 12,000 percent and unemployment at 40 percent. The government of Violetta Chamorro is split between moderates, who approve her concessions to the ousted Sandinistas, and hard-line ex-contras who want faster land redistribution to former contra soldiers.The Sandinista-controlled unions are on a new round of strikes, anticipating austerities that the International Monetary Fund wants Mrs. Chamorro to impose.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | September 7, 1993
Bill threatens the Bosnian Serbs with air strikes so often, even he doesn't take it seriously.President Chamorro will boot General Ortega from command of Nicaragua's army, so she says.What can you do with a league that considers Green Bay, Wis., a major league town?
NEWS
By JOHN M. McCLINTOCK | August 29, 1993
In 1990, Violeta Chamorro floated over bloody Nicaragua, pronounced it healed and was elected president.She had appeared as if from heaven -- a still beautiful grandmother, almost invariably dressed in white, who traveled the rutted dirt roads of that heavily Catholic country in a vehicle designed to resemble the "pope mobile."The non-charismatic Mrs. Chamorro even managed a semblance that tight, benign smile peculiar to Pope John Paul II. And for a while, the 64-year-old newspaper publisher was the saintly embodiment of the nation's desire to bind its wounds.
NEWS
August 26, 1993
Nicaraguan President Violeta Chamorro's gamble that she could share power in good faith with the Marxist-inspired Sandinistas she defeated in 1990 elections is tearing her country apart and placing her own hold on office in jeopardy.Her attempt to govern by reconciliation is taken by her many enemies on the right as well as the left as a fatal weakness which cries out for exploitation. The result is thuggery in the countryside, international terrorism operations in Managua, poverty and disaffection all around, and now this: aid-cutoff pressure from a Clinton administration that is losing patience with Mrs. Chamorro.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service | August 24, 1993
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- A hostage crisis that has deepened Nicaragua's sense of political paralysis dragged on yesterday as rightist former rebels in a northern village and leftist former soldiers here in the capital both refused to free most of the dozens of politicians and others they seized last week.The tensions appeared to ease somewhat after both groups met with representatives of a special mediation panel and released some of their hostages. Yesterday afternoon, the country's Roman Catholic primate, Cardinal Miguel Obando y Bravo, also agreed to the mediators' request that he intervene to help resolve the situation.
NEWS
By Knight-Ridder News Service | November 4, 1992
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- From the rugged Nicaraguan mountains to the palace of President Violeta Chamorro, one "yanqui" name is familiar to guerrillas and government leaders alike: Jesse Helms, the Republican senator from North Carolina.In recent months, Mr. Helms has assumed extraordinary sway in this struggling Third World country, which in the past 20 years has seen two bloody civil wars, earthquakes, tidal waves and a hurricane.Because of a procedural quirk that allows a single senator to place an informal hold on foreign aid, Mr. Helms by himself has managed to freeze $116 million desperately needed by Nicaragua.
NEWS
By Knight Ridder News Service | August 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Nicaragua remains firmly in the grasp of the Sandinistas more than two years after their revolutionary government was ousted by a democratic election, says a Senate report to be released today.The Sandinistas, who waged war for a decade against U.S.-backed contras, still control the army and police, retain thousands of confiscated properties and are systematically assassinating disarmed contras, the report alleges.The 153-page document, compiled by the Republican staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee under the tutelage of Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C.
NEWS
April 20, 1991
The U.S. visit by Violeta Chamorro was the first by a Nicaraguan president to Washington since 1939. That is symbol enough of the self-respect and respectability to which this elected leader has brought her war-torn little country. She and Nicaragua deserve American help. The most important thing President Bush could do, as well as the least, was receive her. That he and Congress did.But beyond fending off right-wing contra carping at her policy of national reconciliation, which the Bush administration also did, it might also have coughed up a lot of money.
NEWS
By Knight Ridder News Service | August 31, 1992
WASHINGTON -- Nicaragua remains firmly in the grasp of the Sandinistas more than two years after their revolutionary government was ousted by a democratic election, says a Senate report to be released today.The Sandinistas, who waged war for a decade against U.S.-backed contras, still control the army and police, retain thousands of confiscated properties and are systematically assassinating disarmed contras, the report alleges.The 153-page document, compiled by the Republican staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee under the tutelage of Sen. Jesse Helms, R-N.C.
NEWS
By Knight Ridder News Service | August 31, 1992
MANAGUA -- A U.S. Senate panel's report on Nicaragua paints a picture of a government riddled with nepotism that doles out fat loans to friends without expecting repayment.The report says President Violeta Chamorro's top aide may be profiteering off U.S. donations, buying votes in the Nicaraguan Congress and backing a Sandinista army chief who is stashing millions in bank accounts in Canada.The broad allegations, often supported by unnamed sources or based on press accounts, begin with a demand by the Republican staff of the Senate Foreign Relations Committee for stricter oversight of U.S. aid to Nicaragua.
NEWS
January 17, 1992
MANAGUA, Nicaragua -- The government of President Violeta Chamorro spurred negotiations with armed bands yesterday in an effort to pacify Nicaragua on the eve of a visit by U.S. Secretary of State James A. Baker III.A peaceful Nicaragua is a must for continued U.S. aid. Mr. Baker, who arrives for a five-hour visit today, stressed the need for peace last November after rioting by Sandinista Front militants caused millions of dollars of damage to public property.Interior...
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