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ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
The Chameleon Cafe on Harford Road has a new executive chef. It's Andrew Weinzirl, recently of the Wine Market in Locust Point. Weinzirl takes over from The Chameleon 's owner, Jeff Smith. Replacing Weinzirl as The Wine Market 's executive chef is Wilbur Cox, formerly sous chef at B&O Brasserie . Weinzirl's debut menu, which is up and running, signals a gentle change in programming at the popular restaurant. Think of it as glasnost. There are more small plates now, and diners are invited to make more casual drop-in visits.
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NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2013
At Maggie's Farm, on a late December night, the small, square Harford Road dining room was full, with couples and foursomes along the edges, and in the middle, two separate large parties, of 12 and 18, celebrating birthdays. We were concerned about our own good time. Are these people going to get loud? Can I get my order in before they do? There was no need to worry, not at Maggie's Farm, which serves up big flavors with a mellow attitude and makes the hard work of preparing and serving good food feel effortless.
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NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | May 21, 2006
When the Chameleon Cafe opened five years ago, Lauraville was still a well-kept secret. The neighborhood renaissance had hardly begun. No plans had been announced to develop a chic little shopping center and yoga studio at the corner of Harford Road and Montebello Terrace, and the area's real estate hadn't taken off the way it soon would. The idea that the new restaurant across the street from the Safeway would be serving haute cuisine instead of crab cakes, hon, was almost inconceivable.
ENTERTAINMENT
by Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | November 2, 2012
The Chameleon is changing. Jeff Smith has sold his restaurant, a major player in Baltimore's farm-to-table movement, to executive chef, Andrew Weinzirl. The restaurant will now be known as Maggie's Farm; new signage should be appearing any day now at the Lauraville restaurant. The news is not a complete surprise. Weinzirl, formerly of the Wine Market in Locust Point, took over the Chameleon kitchen from Smith back in the spring, and the transition to Maggie's Farm began shortly after.
NEWS
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | January 5, 2013
At Maggie's Farm, on a late December night, the small, square Harford Road dining room was full, with couples and foursomes along the edges, and in the middle, two separate large parties, of 12 and 18, celebrating birthdays. We were concerned about our own good time. Are these people going to get loud? Can I get my order in before they do? There was no need to worry, not at Maggie's Farm, which serves up big flavors with a mellow attitude and makes the hard work of preparing and serving good food feel effortless.
FEATURES
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | November 17, 1996
Anything less like its namesake than Westminster's new restaurant Chameleon is hard to imagine.Chameleons are supposed to blend into their surroundings -- isn't that the whole point? But here, on the town's quaint Main Street, the restaurant's spare stylishness sticks out like a sore thumb. (Except that a sore thumb sounds unattractive, and Chameleon is anything but.)The old-fashioned storefront has been newly renovated. Bare wood floors gleam; the off-white walls are hung with contemporary nudes; the furnishings are simple but have lots of pizazz.
NEWS
By Dana Hedgpeth and Dana Hedgpeth,Sun Staff Writer | July 3, 1994
Even after four rides, Tracy Wolfe could not describe everything she saw and felt on the Chameleon."So much is happening when you're on it," Miss Wolfe said of the high-tech, "virtual reality" amusement park ride. "It's incredible though. There's no doubt about that."Chameleon came to Fort Meade on Friday for MeadeFest, a four-day fair that continues today and tomorrow from noon to 11:30 p.m. Admission is free.The machine's 3-D graphics and motion-based simulation let riders "fly" their aircraft through tunnels of the planet Terium and shoot down enemy Graaks -- evil, green monsters -- while dodging exploding mines.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | April 28, 2007
In the late '90s, during the boom of teen pop, Christina Aguilera was usually singled out by critics as the one with the potential to transcend the genre. Unlike her other picture-perfect bubblegum peers (namely Jessica Simpson, Mandy Moore and especially Britney Spears), she possessed "real talent": a powerful, if slightly affected, singing style that evoked, at times, vintage Whitney Houston. In the eight years since the release of Aguilera's monstrous, self-titled debut, which sold 12 million copies and spawned the ubiquitous smashes "Genie in a Bottle" and "What a Girl Wants," the artist has become something of a pop chameleon.
FEATURES
By Amalie Adler Ascher | July 6, 1991
HouttuyniaBotanical name: Houttuynia cordata ChameleonPronunciation: hoo-TUNE-ee-ahFamily: Saururaceae (Lizard's-tail)Origin: JapanClass: PerennialDisplay period: SummerlongHeight: 6 to 9 inchesEnvironment: SunIgnorance sometimes pays off in gardening. Had I known the full story of houttuynia, I would probably have resisted buying the plant despite the allure of its gorgeous picture in a nursery catalog. I would thus have missed the untold pleasure the plant has brought me in a pot on my terrace.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | October 1, 2009
A brightly banded chameleon, a strongman tattooed in academic symbols and a guy with the gears of his mind exposed all took their places above midtown Wednesday when the University of Baltimore unveiled a series of banners depicting the connection between institution and city. The illustrations are musings on UB's campus slogan, "Knowledge That Works." Officials also hope the 50 banners will be a flamboyant manifestation of the university's overall quest to be more recognized. "The whole idea when I came here was to begin defining our borders," said UB President Robert L. Bogomolny.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick and The Baltimore Sun | May 2, 2012
The Chameleon Cafe on Harford Road has a new executive chef. It's Andrew Weinzirl, recently of the Wine Market in Locust Point. Weinzirl takes over from The Chameleon 's owner, Jeff Smith. Replacing Weinzirl as The Wine Market 's executive chef is Wilbur Cox, formerly sous chef at B&O Brasserie . Weinzirl's debut menu, which is up and running, signals a gentle change in programming at the popular restaurant. Think of it as glasnost. There are more small plates now, and diners are invited to make more casual drop-in visits.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | October 5, 2011
Vespertine: being nocturnal or nightly; a popular album by Bjork; a drink created by author Ian Fleming in his first James Bond novel, “Casino Royale”; my favorite new cocktail at The Chameleon Café in Lauraville. When it comes to mixing up a quality drink, Chameleon's general manager - and self-proclaimed cocktail nerd - Matt Weaver means serious business. The drink list, created by Weaver just eight months ago, is an impressive tribute to Prohibition-era libations with a twist, or as Weaver says, “classic cocktails with character.”  Take the Vespertine, a clever spin on the Bond martini.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Richard Gorelick, The Baltimore Sun | July 23, 2011
The Chameleon seems to slither on and off of people's radar. For one thing, folks confuse it with Clementine, just a mile to the north. And while Chameleon doesn't actively shun publicity, it does tend to keep quieter than some of the other restaurants working with the same materials — the local, responsible and seasonally changing. Recently, the restaurant has been nudging itself toward the spotlight. For starters, it's changed its name — no longer the Chameleon Cafe, it's simply the Chameleon.
NEWS
By Childs Walker and Childs Walker,childs.walker@baltsun.com | October 1, 2009
A brightly banded chameleon, a strongman tattooed in academic symbols and a guy with the gears of his mind exposed all took their places above midtown Wednesday when the University of Baltimore unveiled a series of banners depicting the connection between institution and city. The illustrations are musings on UB's campus slogan, "Knowledge That Works." Officials also hope the 50 banners will be a flamboyant manifestation of the university's overall quest to be more recognized. "The whole idea when I came here was to begin defining our borders," said UB President Robert L. Bogomolny.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley and Mary Carole McCauley,mary.mccauley@baltsun.com | January 4, 2009
The man in the black cotton skirt and kerchief plucks the string of pearls hanging around his neck. His fingers probe cautiously the area over his heart, as if to determine if that organ has remained intact. Charlotte von Mahlsdorf, Berlin's controversial "tranny granny," was a transvestite, folk hero and police informant who died in 2002. But she will step onto the Everyman Theatre stage this month in the person of actor Bruce Nelson, who is starring in a one-performer play called I A m My Own Wife that is based on her life story.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | April 28, 2007
In the late '90s, during the boom of teen pop, Christina Aguilera was usually singled out by critics as the one with the potential to transcend the genre. Unlike her other picture-perfect bubblegum peers (namely Jessica Simpson, Mandy Moore and especially Britney Spears), she possessed "real talent": a powerful, if slightly affected, singing style that evoked, at times, vintage Whitney Houston. In the eight years since the release of Aguilera's monstrous, self-titled debut, which sold 12 million copies and spawned the ubiquitous smashes "Genie in a Bottle" and "What a Girl Wants," the artist has become something of a pop chameleon.
BUSINESS
By Marie Gullard and Marie Gullard,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | March 2, 2003
When the locals gather at the Chameleon Cafe on Harford Road, it usually is for a hearty meal at a good price. Here, in comfortable surroundings, amid bright wall hangings and mismatched tables and chairs, no one is really a stranger. Food, and the comings and goings of Lauraville, dominate the conversation. Across the street from the cafe stands a bold Victorian home that shows how the combination of businesses and houses works in this neighborhood just 10 to 15 minutes northeast of the Inner Harbor.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Meekah Hopkins | October 5, 2011
Vespertine: being nocturnal or nightly; a popular album by Bjork; a drink created by author Ian Fleming in his first James Bond novel, “Casino Royale”; my favorite new cocktail at The Chameleon Café in Lauraville. When it comes to mixing up a quality drink, Chameleon's general manager - and self-proclaimed cocktail nerd - Matt Weaver means serious business. The drink list, created by Weaver just eight months ago, is an impressive tribute to Prohibition-era libations with a twist, or as Weaver says, “classic cocktails with character.”  Take the Vespertine, a clever spin on the Bond martini.
NEWS
By ELIZABETH LARGE and ELIZABETH LARGE,SUN RESTAURANT CRITIC | May 21, 2006
When the Chameleon Cafe opened five years ago, Lauraville was still a well-kept secret. The neighborhood renaissance had hardly begun. No plans had been announced to develop a chic little shopping center and yoga studio at the corner of Harford Road and Montebello Terrace, and the area's real estate hadn't taken off the way it soon would. The idea that the new restaurant across the street from the Safeway would be serving haute cuisine instead of crab cakes, hon, was almost inconceivable.
FEATURES
By J. Wynn Rousuck and J. Wynn Rousuck,SUN THEATER CRITIC | June 5, 2004
NEW YORK - I Am My Own Wife hadn't been written when playwright Doug Wright invited Jefferson Mays to the Sundance Theatre Institute in Utah to work on the script. Mays asked what the play would be about. "A 65-year-old East German transvestite," Wright told him. "Yeah, oh, absolutely!" Mays replied. Little did the New York-based actor - a veteran of eight productions at Center Stage - realize that he would still be portraying the late German cross-dresser (and more than 30 other characters)
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