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By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 1996
The Chamber Music Society of Baltimore opened its 47th season Sunday afternoon at the Baltimore Museum of Art Meyerhoff Auditorium with a concert by the Cavani Quartet that failed to meet the society's high standards.Mozart's "Dissonant" String Quartet (K.465), which opened the program, displayed the problems that bedeviled the quartet all afternoon. First violinist Annie Fullard had countless technical and intonational mishaps that ruined the music's fabric, the too-precious performance missing the work's dynamic contrasts.
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February 13, 2005
Kathryn Engebretson, 48, president of the William Penn Foundation and a former treasurer for the city of Philadelphia who helped bring it back from the brink of bankruptcy, died Thursday of breast cancer at her home in Bryn Mawr, Pa. She was named in 2001 to head the William Penn Foundation, which has assets of more than $1 billion and awarded nearly $58 million last year to nonprofit groups in the region. In 1992, she helped Gov. Edward G. Rendell, then Philadelphia's newly elected mayor, craft a plan to fix the city's finances.
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By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 3, 1995
The Chamber Music Society of Baltimore opened its 46th season Sunday evening at the Baltimore Museum of Art on a high note, with a spirited recital by the Colorado String Quartet. It's always a pleasure to hear young string quartets display talent and enthusiasm with not only standard quartet fare but also challenging new scores.The focal point of the evening was a dazzling interpretation of the Quartet No. 4 by the Czech composer Karel Husa. The work is constructed in six continuous movements, each based on a specific poetic idea surrounding the 1989 events in Husa's homeland as the Communist regime fell.
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By Tim Smith and Tim Smith,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | April 9, 2002
The walls of Shriver Hall reverberated to some stylish music-making over the weekend. Bass-baritone Simon Estes gave a recital at the Johns Hopkins University venue Saturday night, followed 24 hours later by the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. As a rule, age is not kind to singers; erosion of technique and tone is almost inevitable. So it wasn't surprising to hear some frayed edges as Estes, 64, offered songs and arias. But the voice has retained a remarkable amount of power and beauty, more than enough to give his recital the sound of authority.
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By Peter M. Krask and Peter M. Krask,Special to The Evening Sun Staff | October 23, 1990
There is no easy way to review last night's concert by the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center at the Baltimore Museum of Art. It was invigorating to hear musicians of such impeccable talent perform some of the newest music available. It was challenging to try and understand these works. It was even heartening that the audience was so receptive to them.It was also deeply unsatisfying.Each work on the program contained ideas of prodigious imagination and intellect. There can be no denying the skill that went into their composition; yet, skill is not enough.
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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1997
The Chamber Music Society of Baltimore, one of the city's oldest musical organizations, will dissolve after 47 years of presenting world-famous groups and challenging new works at the Baltimore Museum of Art.Renowned for commissioning works from prominent composers, the Chamber Music Society's board of directors recently voted to dissolve the organization because of fund-raising difficulties and shrinking audiences.At the society's last concert in April, there were perhaps 50 in the audience, according to Randolph Rothschild, the organization's prime patron.
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By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2000
One of the most accomplished string quartets of them all comes Saturday night to Smith Theatre under the auspices of Candlelight Concerts. Taking the stage at 8 p.m. will be the Orion String Quartet, which serves as quartet-in-residence at the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Violinists Daniel Phillips and Todd Phillips (who share the ensemble's violin roles equally), violist Steven Tenenboim and cellist Timothy Eddy have collaborated with such luminaries as cellist Pablo Casals, pianists Rudolf and Peter Serkin and soprano Benita Valente.
NEWS
February 13, 2005
Kathryn Engebretson, 48, president of the William Penn Foundation and a former treasurer for the city of Philadelphia who helped bring it back from the brink of bankruptcy, died Thursday of breast cancer at her home in Bryn Mawr, Pa. She was named in 2001 to head the William Penn Foundation, which has assets of more than $1 billion and awarded nearly $58 million last year to nonprofit groups in the region. In 1992, she helped Gov. Edward G. Rendell, then Philadelphia's newly elected mayor, craft a plan to fix the city's finances.
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By Robert Haskins | December 10, 1990
For its concert yesterday afternoon at the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Chamber Music Society of Baltimore featured three musicians who have tirelessly promoted the music of our time -- English hornist Thomas Stacy and oboists Bert Lucarelli and James Ostryniec.The three internationally known performers carry impeccable credentials. Mr. Stacy, principal English hornist with the New York Philharmonic, has premiered important concertos by such composers as Vincent Persichetti and Bernard Hoffer.
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By Karen Conley and Karen Conley,Contributing Writer | June 21, 1992
The most noteworthy aspect of the 10-day Columbia Festival of the Arts, which runs Wednesday through July 3, is the opportunity it affords patrons to watch art in progress.From music to dance to crafts, there will be more than 50 acts, classes and events, many offering patrons behind-the-scenes views, hands-on experience and close-up demonstrations.Last year the festival drew more than 30,000 people, 40 percent of them from outside Howard County, and festival managing director Lynne Nemeth said this year, the festival's fourth, she is expecting the same turnout.
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By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN MUSIC CRITIC | March 6, 2000
When word got around that the Candlelight Concert Society would be presenting a performance by the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center featuring violinist Hilary Hahn, the recital in Columbia suddenly became one of the hottest tickets in town. Not only was the Howard Community College's Smith Theatre filled to capacity, but there were many more who wanted in and simply couldn't obtain tickets. It wasn't just that the Baltimore-born virtuoso was riding high in the wake of her recent Grammy nomination.
NEWS
By Phil Greenfield and Phil Greenfield,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | February 17, 2000
One of the most accomplished string quartets of them all comes Saturday night to Smith Theatre under the auspices of Candlelight Concerts. Taking the stage at 8 p.m. will be the Orion String Quartet, which serves as quartet-in-residence at the Chamber Music Society of Lincoln Center. Violinists Daniel Phillips and Todd Phillips (who share the ensemble's violin roles equally), violist Steven Tenenboim and cellist Timothy Eddy have collaborated with such luminaries as cellist Pablo Casals, pianists Rudolf and Peter Serkin and soprano Benita Valente.
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By Judith Green and Judith Green,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | April 16, 1998
Richard Goode is known as an immaculate pianist: an elegant interpreter of Beethoven and Schubert, a sensitive accompanist and chamber musician.But if it weren't for his not-so-immaculate private life, in which procrastination and messiness play a large part, he would not be married to violinist Marcia Weinfeld nor would he perform recitals with her -- one of which is Saturday at the Rouse Theatre in Columbia.Goode and Weinfeld have been married 11 years as of last week. They met when she was a violinist in the National Arts Centre Orchestra of Ottawa in Canada.
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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | November 23, 1997
As the afternoon sun streams through his spacious house, 88-year-old Randy Rothschild looks closely at a thin piece of paper with a long list of musical births, a list of contemporary chamber music, orchestral pieces, solo works and several small operas.He begins to read the composers' names aloud in a soft, frail voice -- Henry Cowell, Gunther Schuller, Leon Kirchner, Ernst Krenek, Richard Wernick, Lukas Foss, Robert Hall Lewis, Charles Wuorinen, Hugo Weisgall, Milton Babbitt, Christopher Rouse, John Harbison.
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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,SUN STAFF | July 29, 1997
The Chamber Music Society of Baltimore, one of the city's oldest musical organizations, will dissolve after 47 years of presenting world-famous groups and challenging new works at the Baltimore Museum of Art.Renowned for commissioning works from prominent composers, the Chamber Music Society's board of directors recently voted to dissolve the organization because of fund-raising difficulties and shrinking audiences.At the society's last concert in April, there were perhaps 50 in the audience, according to Randolph Rothschild, the organization's prime patron.
FEATURES
By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 8, 1996
The Chamber Music Society of Baltimore opened its 47th season Sunday afternoon at the Baltimore Museum of Art Meyerhoff Auditorium with a concert by the Cavani Quartet that failed to meet the society's high standards.Mozart's "Dissonant" String Quartet (K.465), which opened the program, displayed the problems that bedeviled the quartet all afternoon. First violinist Annie Fullard had countless technical and intonational mishaps that ruined the music's fabric, the too-precious performance missing the work's dynamic contrasts.
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By Linell Smith and Linell Smith,Staff Writer | July 25, 1993
The National Endowment for the Arts recently awarded $551,050 in grants -- including $135,000 to Center Stage -- to a variety of arts programs and organizations in Maryland. Federal funds went to support arts programs in artistically under-served areas, to theater, to radio and television arts programs, to special museum exhibitions and to arts education programs.A list of recipients in the Baltimore area follows:Baltimore Symphony Orchestra Inc., for music recording, $28,000; Johns Hopkins University, for music professional training, $16,300; Children's Theater Association, for professional theater, $5,000; Center Stage Associates, for professional theater, $135,000; Soundprint Media Center, for radio programming, $35,000; Johns Hopkins University, media programming in the arts, $20,000; Mid-Atlantic Arts Foundation, for visual artists' public projects, $20,000; Maryland Art Place, for visual artists' public projects, $7,750; Maryland Institute, College Art, for special exhibitions and for writers' residencies, $25,000 and $8,500; Baltimore Museum of Art, for special exhibitions, $15,000; the Walters Art Gallery, for special exhibitions, $10,000; Maryland State Arts Council, for arts projects in under-served communities, two grants totaling $72,900.
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By David Donovan and David Donovan,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 3, 1995
The Chamber Music Society of Baltimore opened its 46th season Sunday evening at the Baltimore Museum of Art on a high note, with a spirited recital by the Colorado String Quartet. It's always a pleasure to hear young string quartets display talent and enthusiasm with not only standard quartet fare but also challenging new scores.The focal point of the evening was a dazzling interpretation of the Quartet No. 4 by the Czech composer Karel Husa. The work is constructed in six continuous movements, each based on a specific poetic idea surrounding the 1989 events in Husa's homeland as the Communist regime fell.
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By Stephen Wigler and Stephen Wigler,Sun Music Critic | April 10, 1995
Certain occasions lead one to the suspicion -- artistically, at least -- that the second half of the 20th century does not measure up to the first. One took place yesterday when the Boston Composers String Quartet -- violinists Clayton Hoener and Sue Rabut-Cartwright, violist Scott Woolweaver and cellist Reinmar Seidler -- performed an afternoon of string quartets in the Chamber Music Society of Baltimore series at the Baltimore Museum of Art.First on...
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