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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2005
TEHRAN, Iran -- Ahmad Chalabi, the former Iraqi exile who has become a deputy prime minister, met with senior Iranians yesterday in what appeared to be an effort to distance himself from them, just days before he visits Washington. In a series of closed meetings, Chalabi saw Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the Iranian president; Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mattaki; and Ali Larijani, head of the Iranian National Security Council. Chalabi said he had spoken to the Iranians about an issue that seemed likely to endear him to the Americans: the question of Iranian interference in Iraq's domestic politics.
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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | November 6, 2005
TEHRAN, Iran -- Ahmad Chalabi, the former Iraqi exile who has become a deputy prime minister, met with senior Iranians yesterday in what appeared to be an effort to distance himself from them, just days before he visits Washington. In a series of closed meetings, Chalabi saw Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, the Iranian president; Foreign Minister Manouchehr Mattaki; and Ali Larijani, head of the Iranian National Security Council. Chalabi said he had spoken to the Iranians about an issue that seemed likely to endear him to the Americans: the question of Iranian interference in Iraq's domestic politics.
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NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Mark Matthews,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 13, 2003
WASHINGTON - President Bush says he wants the Iraqi people to pick their future leaders. But one man in particular, Ahmad Chalabi, has gotten a major boost from the United States in the scramble for power in postwar Iraq. Other would-be political players in Iraq seized on the chaos that followed Saddam Hussein's fall to set up headquarters in choice buildings abandoned by the old regime. But only Chalabi has a stipend from the American taxpayers, a 700-member militia trained and paid for by the United States, his own liaison officer with U.S. authorities, and close ties on Capitol Hill and with senior officials in the Pentagon and Vice President Dick Cheney's office.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | March 22, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - I'm glad President Bush has nominated Paul Wolfowitz to become president of the World Bank. After all, Mr. Bush might have named him national security adviser to replace Condoleezza Rice. At least at the World Bank his poor judgment won't lead to thousands of needless military and civilian deaths. In fact, the World Bank would have been a better home for Mr. Wolfowitz than the Pentagon, where he is deputy defense secretary. Of all the neoconservatives who pushed for toppling Saddam Hussein, he was the only apparent idealist, the one who believed that Iraq might become a model for change in the Mideast.
NEWS
By Patrick J. McDonnell and Patrick J. McDonnell,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 18, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraqi authorities ratified national elections results yesterday that gave a slim parliamentary majority for a Shiite-led coalition as the victors wrangled about a choice for a future prime minister among two leading candidates. Ahmad Chalabi, the one-time Pentagon favorite who had a falling-out with Washington, suggested that he had the votes within the winning coalition to snare the top job but said a decision probably would be put off until at least Monday. He is said to be in a race with the presumed front-runner, Ibrahim Jafari, a moderate Islamist and soft-spoken physician.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | May 30, 2004
When Iraqi police raided the Baghdad home and offices of politician Ahmad Chalabi on May 20, U.S. officials hurried to distance themselves, saying that the operation was an Iraqi affair and that no U.S. government employees were involved. But eight armed American contractors paid by a U.S. State Department program went on the raid, directing and encouraging the Iraqi police officers who eyewitnesses say ripped out computers, turned over furniture and smashed photographs. Some of the Americans helped themselves to baklava, apples and diet soda from Chalabi's refrigerator, and enjoyed their looted snacks in a garden outside, according to members of Chalabi's staff who were there.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | December 15, 2002
LONDON - Opponents of Iraqi President Saddam Hussein opened a conference here yesterday in hopes of forming a united front and planning for a transitional government that would prevent the United States from imposing its vision on a post-Hussein Iraq. Although there is plenty of dissension among the conference's 330 delegates about how and when such a transitional government should be formed, a string of speakers from across the opposition's political spectrum expressed unanimity in their demand that the United States leave Iraq's political future to Iraqis.
NEWS
April 8, 2003
ALL OF A SUDDEN there appears outside the city of Nasiriyah, courtesy of the U.S. Army, something called the Free Iraqi Forces. This is a battalion of fighters armed and equipped by the United States that will participate in the pacification of the Iraqi people. It is under the leadership of the Iraqi National Congress, a group of squabbling exiles headed by Ahmed Chalabi, a banker who left his native land 45 years ago and now has designs on the country's top job. If there were a worse way to take over a country it would be difficult to imagine.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | March 22, 2005
PHILADELPHIA - I'm glad President Bush has nominated Paul Wolfowitz to become president of the World Bank. After all, Mr. Bush might have named him national security adviser to replace Condoleezza Rice. At least at the World Bank his poor judgment won't lead to thousands of needless military and civilian deaths. In fact, the World Bank would have been a better home for Mr. Wolfowitz than the Pentagon, where he is deputy defense secretary. Of all the neoconservatives who pushed for toppling Saddam Hussein, he was the only apparent idealist, the one who believed that Iraq might become a model for change in the Mideast.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Laura Sullivan and Mark Matthews and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 30, 2004
WASHINGTON - The trial of Saddam Hussein would pose huge challenges even if it weren't going to be held in a war zone where, as an Iraqi court official put it, some of his alleged victims might "cut him to pieces" unless U.S. troops stood guard. The type of charges Hussein is likely to face - war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide - often involve an unwieldy number of witnesses, a mountain of documents and large teams of prosecutors and lawyers, as well as a complex body of law. But in Hussein's case, the problems will be compounded by the fragile state of the nation's justice system, Iraq's political and ethnic divisions, relations with neighboring states, controversy over the death penalty and the need to meet international standards of due process while satisfying demands for justice both in Iraq and in other countries, according to legal experts.
NEWS
By Patrick J. McDonnell and Patrick J. McDonnell,LOS ANGELES TIMES | February 18, 2005
BAGHDAD, Iraq - Iraqi authorities ratified national elections results yesterday that gave a slim parliamentary majority for a Shiite-led coalition as the victors wrangled about a choice for a future prime minister among two leading candidates. Ahmad Chalabi, the one-time Pentagon favorite who had a falling-out with Washington, suggested that he had the votes within the winning coalition to snare the top job but said a decision probably would be put off until at least Monday. He is said to be in a race with the presumed front-runner, Ibrahim Jafari, a moderate Islamist and soft-spoken physician.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | September 28, 2004
A senior Iraqi judge said yesterday that he had closed a case brought against Ahmad Chalabi, the former exile once backed by the Pentagon, who had been suspected of involvement in a counterfeiting operation. The judge, Zuhair al-Maliky, said in a telephone interview that he took the action about a week and a half ago because he had decided "the evidence was not enough to bring the case to trial." If more evidence emerges, he said, the case will be reopened. The decision also followed conversations between Chalabi's lawyers and representatives of the Central Bank of Iraq, the judge said.
NEWS
By KNIGHT RIDDER/TRIBUNE | August 10, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The Iraqi judge who issued arrest warrants for one-time U.S. ally Ahmad Chalabi and his nephew said yesterday that he would seek international police assistance and file extradition requests if they don't return voluntarily to Iraq. Ahmad Chalabi, who is accused of laundering counterfeit Iraqi currency through money markets, was in Tehran, Iran. His nephew, Salem, a prosecutor now charged with murder stemming from the killing of a Finance Ministry official investigating corruption, was in London.
NEWS
By Edmund Sanders and David Holley and Edmund Sanders and David Holley,LOS ANGELES TIMES | August 9, 2004
NAJAF, Iraq -- Interim Iraqi Prime Minister Ayad Allawi and top U.S. military officials made an emergency visit to Najaf yesterday in hopes of ending the Shiite insurrection, but their efforts failed and they had to be hustled out of town amid renewed attacks by followers of radical cleric Muqtada al-Sadr. After arriving on a U.S. Black Hawk helicopter and traveling through the holy city in a convoy of a dozen heavily armored vehicles, Allawi met with regional Iraqi officials and U.S. military commanders in the city center.
NEWS
By Alissa J. Rubin and Alissa J. Rubin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 31, 2004
BAGHDAD, Iraq - The United States has confronted many surprises in its efforts to forge a democratic government in Iraq, but few have been more unexpected than the transformation of Ahmad Chalabi from patrician exile to deft populist. But Chalabi is a survivor. Snubbed by the Bush administration neoconservatives who once embraced him and excluded from the interim government, he is building a grass-roots coalition of Shiite Muslim groups who lack a voice in the new Iraq. At the same time, he's reaching out to Iraq's most prominent anti-American Shiite cleric, Muqtada al-Sadr, whose followers come mainly from Baghdad's urban underclass and the impoverished south of the country.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and Laura Sullivan and Mark Matthews and Laura Sullivan,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | June 30, 2004
WASHINGTON - The trial of Saddam Hussein would pose huge challenges even if it weren't going to be held in a war zone where, as an Iraqi court official put it, some of his alleged victims might "cut him to pieces" unless U.S. troops stood guard. The type of charges Hussein is likely to face - war crimes, crimes against humanity and genocide - often involve an unwieldy number of witnesses, a mountain of documents and large teams of prosecutors and lawyers, as well as a complex body of law. But in Hussein's case, the problems will be compounded by the fragile state of the nation's justice system, Iraq's political and ethnic divisions, relations with neighboring states, controversy over the death penalty and the need to meet international standards of due process while satisfying demands for justice both in Iraq and in other countries, according to legal experts.
NEWS
July 16, 2003
Iraq's interim government, called the Governing Council, is made up of 25 people responsible for creating a new Iraq. Next week, they plan to begin appointing Cabinet members. Eventually, they will organize a commission to draft a constitution. Yesterday, they said they considered it their duty to convene a court to try high-level officials of the Saddam Hussein government for war crimes. They have the authority to approve a budget for next year. They are trying to fill Iraq's seat at the United Nations.
NEWS
May 21, 2004
NATIONAL Many in GOP anxious As members of Congress head home today for the 10-day Memorial Day recess, many Republicans leave anxious about the war in Iraq, disheartened by President Bush's sagging approval ratings and worried about dissent within the party. [Page 3a] Zinc defeats pneumonia in study Zinc supplements, a popular if controversial weapon against colds in the United States, are effective in treating cases of severe pneumonia, researchers have reported. [Page 4a] WORLD Chalabi home in Iraq raided U.S. and Iraqi law enforcement officers raided the home of one-time U.S. ally Ahmad Chalabi in Iraq, seizing documents and computers.
NEWS
By Ted Galen Carpenter | June 16, 2004
WASHINGTON -- The Bush administration's disenchantment with its one-time favorite Iraqi client, Ahmad Chalabi, has centered on the explosive allegation that he and his associates may have forwarded highly classified U.S. information to the fundamentalist Islamist government in Iran. Specifically, Mr. Chalabi and his cohorts are accused of informing Tehran that the United States had broken the communications code of Iran's intelligence service. Mr. Chalabi dismissed the charges as part of a CIA plot to discredit him. The CIA has long suspected Mr. Chalabi's motives, and many analysts resent his ability to pass off speculation as fact, even over the advice of genuine experts within the U.S. government.
NEWS
By Knut Royce and Knut Royce,NEWSDAY | June 3, 2004
WASHINGTON - The FBI has launched an investigation into who disclosed to Ahmad Chalabi that the United States had broken an Iranian communications code, information he reportedly passed on to the Iranian intelligence service. Federal law enforcement officials confirmed yesterday that the FBI's counterintelligence division was investigating the leak to Chalabi, head of the Iraqi National Congress and until recently the Pentagon's favorite to rule Iraq. "We're not looking into Chalabi so much as we're looking into who provided him that information," one official said.
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