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By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 28, 2003
NEW YORK - So you're inside the dimly lighted bar of the Peninsula Hotel on a breezy afternoon in Manhattan, awaiting the arrival of Chaka Khan. As you sit in a deep, plush chair by the window, you take in the ornate gold, burgundy and mahogany decor, the crystal chandeliers, the snooty waiter. You can just smell the money in this joint. You are here to chat with Chaka (yes, she's a first-name diva) about her just-published tell-all, Chaka!: Through the Fire. Thirty years have passed since the woman scored her first smash, "Tell Me Something Good," the Stevie Wonder-penned classic that snagged 2 million record buyers with its slow-grind funk and Chaka's volcanic pipes.
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NEWS
August 3, 2008
Today BALTIMORE INTERNATIONAL FESTIVAL : Second day of festivities at the Poly/Western High School field, 140 W. Cold Spring Lane, which hosts a multicultural event with various activities, including performances by Nu World Art Ensemble, an African dance troupe and reggae artist Maxie Priest; demonstrations of capoeria, a Brazilian blend of martial arts and dance; and tae kwon do. Festivalgoers can also choose from an array of ethnic foods. The event runs noon-9 p.m. today. Free. 410-396-3141 or baltimorecity.
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FEATURES
By Charles Passy and Charles Passy,COX NEWS SERVICE | June 13, 1998
In a three-decade rock 'n' roll career, David Crosby has probably supplied enough stories to keep a struggling supermarket tabloid from going out of business.Tales of heroin and cocaine addictions. A nine-month stint in a Texas prison. And a down-to-the-wire liver transplant that saved his life in 1994.But the most remarkable story is just emerging.While Crosby was preparing for his transplant, he learned a son he gave up for adoption in the 1960s had been searching for him. He met the man, James Raymond, and discovered that his abandoned child had grown up to be -- what else?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2008
Just announced Disney Music Block Party -- featuring They Might Be Giants, Dan Zanes, Ralph's World, Choo Choo Soul, and host, Raven Symone, Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia July 29-30. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Eagles -- Verizon Center in Washington on July 26. Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. Monday. Also, New Kids on the Block are there on Oct. 2. Tickets go on sale at 11 a.m. Monday. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Cinderella -- Pier Six Pavilion on July 22. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 5, 2008
Just announced Disney Music Block Party -- featuring They Might Be Giants, Dan Zanes, Ralph's World, Choo Choo Soul, and host, Raven Symone, Merriweather Post Pavilion in Columbia July 29-30. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Eagles -- Verizon Center in Washington on July 26. Tickets go on sale at 10 a.m. Monday. Also, New Kids on the Block are there on Oct. 2. Tickets go on sale at 11 a.m. Monday. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.com. Cinderella -- Pier Six Pavilion on July 22. 410-547-7328 or ticketmaster.
FEATURES
By Wayne Hardin | July 11, 1993
Mark Sachs keeps 'em smiling, or at least smileyMark Sachs, 47, a native of Forest Park in Northwest Baltimore, works at a telecommunications firm in Washington. However, he holds a more exotic part-time post as curator of the Smile Face Museum in Silver Spring. Set up in a basement room of the Sachs home, the museum features about 400 items bearing the familiar round face. Among them: a condom, a bag of cat food, a license plate, a restaurant menu, a mannequin dressed entirely in smiley-face-stamped clothing and an autographed picture of U.S. Rep. Pat Schroeder of Colorado (who draws a smiley face in the round part of the "P" in her first name)
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 22, 1995
Let's get this much straight from the start: "Waiting to Exhale" (Arista 18796) is not the new Whitney Houston album.That's not because it's a soundtrack album. After all, "The Bodyguard" was a soundtrack, too, and like "Waiting to Exhale" included tracks by other singers. But Houston was clearly the star of that album and generated the album's only hits."Waiting to Exhale," on the other hand, is more an ensemble piece. Some of that has to do with the fact that Houston only appears on three tracks (one of them a duet with CeCe Winans)
FEATURES
By J.D. Considine and J.D. Considine,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | April 29, 2000
Performing at a big benefit concert is usually perceived as enlightened self-interest. Neil Young, who has an autistic child, organized the Bridge Concerts to raise money for the Bridge School, which treats such children. Adam Yauch of the Beastie Boys is a Buddhist, so he helped organize the Tibetan Freedom Concerts. Because Sting is big on environmental activism, he's a regular part of the annual rain forest benefit concerts. So it's not surprising that Melissa Etheridge was the first artist brought on board for Equality Rocks, the gay and lesbian rights concert being held at Washington's RFK Stadium today.
FEATURES
By J. D. Considine and J. D. Considine,Pop Music Critic | August 5, 1992
Her first name means "fire," and anyone who has ever heard Chaka Khan lift her voice in song knows how apt that is. On stage, hers is an astonishing instrument, full of brilliant colors and vibrant intensity, taking command of the music with the sort of unquestioned authority few singers ever manage.Her flame isn't always on full, however. Speaking with her over the phone early one July afternoon, it seems at times as if she barely has the pilot light going, so soft is her whisper. Granted, some of that is the connection, which makes her Long Island hotel room seem farther away than it is, and some to the fact that she only just woke up.Mostly, though, it's simply a reflection of the fact that Chaka Khan was born to sing.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | September 20, 2007
It's the return of the warrior women of pop - defiant, awesome artists whose best work from back in the day remains unmatched. More seasoned today, they're still making smart, vibrant music. This month, Joni Mitchell, Chaka Khan and Bettye LaVette return with new albums that should satisfy old fans while intriguing new ones. Joni Mitchell, Shine --When I moved to New York seven summers ago, I dove into the music of Joni Mitchell. For months, I lived off of Blue, Court and Spark and The Hissing of Summer Lawns.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | September 20, 2007
It's the return of the warrior women of pop - defiant, awesome artists whose best work from back in the day remains unmatched. More seasoned today, they're still making smart, vibrant music. This month, Joni Mitchell, Chaka Khan and Bettye LaVette return with new albums that should satisfy old fans while intriguing new ones. Joni Mitchell, Shine --When I moved to New York seven summers ago, I dove into the music of Joni Mitchell. For months, I lived off of Blue, Court and Spark and The Hissing of Summer Lawns.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun pop music critic | July 5, 2007
Never mind that the sun is usually merciless and there's hardly any shade in Camden Yards, the site for the African American Heritage Festival every summer since 2002. The event, which starts tomorrow and ends Sunday evening, is all about having a funky good time with family and friends. Vendors sell ornate African masks and unique jewelry. Flavorful foods abound: barbecue, fried catfish, grilled chicken kebabs. And you can wash it all down with lemonade extra-sweetened with pineapple chunks and maraschino cherries.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON | December 8, 2005
His last album, 2004's solid Livin' Large, hadn't hit the streets. And Euge Groove was already thinking about what to do next. The smooth-jazz saxophonist was ready to go into the studio and dive into something real and organic. He started feeling nostalgic, longing for the music that excited him in 1976, the year he entered high school. Back then, Euge dug the pop-glossed jazz of George Benson, who topped the charts in the Bicentennial year with his masterful Breezin'. Barry White and his Love Unlimited Orchestra, Brothers Johnson, Rufus & Chaka Khan -- the artist relished their sounds on 45s and eight-track tapes.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD D. OLLISON and RASHOD D. OLLISON,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | November 3, 2005
Much of the energy comes from the crowd. So when Soulive locks a groove on stage, there's no telling where the music will go. The trio's melodic improvisation is sharper, more adventurous. Funk and blues rhythms pulsate. The people are up, grooving and swaying. The band - guitarist Eric Krasno and the Evans brothers, keyboardist Neal and drummer Alan - push the music more, playing hard and loud. But in the studio, the guys have to work from a different dimension. "It's almost impossible to take the live show to the studio," says Soulive spokesman Alan Evans, who's calling from his home outside Boston.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | February 3, 2005
Mommy's on the phone now. I'll do it later, OK?" Vanessa Williams says, her voice honeyed but firm. Her 4-year-old daughter Sasha is in the background whining about something. "I'm sorry," the singer-actress says, returning to the phone. It's after 8:30 in the evening and Williams, who's calling from her upstate New York home, has been busy all day with the kids (she has four) and making preparations to attend a cousin's memorial service in Maryland the next morning. Later the same day, she will board a plane to Los Angeles on business.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD OLLISON | November 11, 2004
NO MATTER the material - a silly love song, a tricky bop tune, the back of a cake mix box, whatever - Chaka Khan can make it soar. Over the years, the 30-year recording veteran has been imitated by many: some good (Rahsaan Patterson - yes!), some bad (Vesta Williams - girl, give it up). The minute you hear Chaka - that soulful, intergalactic wail, the way she attacks a note and bends it mercilessly - you know there can never be another voice like that. And, at 51, she's better than ever - more vocally refined.
ENTERTAINMENT
By RASHOD OLLISON | November 11, 2004
NO MATTER the material - a silly love song, a tricky bop tune, the back of a cake mix box, whatever - Chaka Khan can make it soar. Over the years, the 30-year recording veteran has been imitated by many: some good (Rahsaan Patterson - yes!), some bad (Vesta Williams - girl, give it up). The minute you hear Chaka - that soulful, intergalactic wail, the way she attacks a note and bends it mercilessly - you know there can never be another voice like that. And, at 51, she's better than ever - more vocally refined.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | September 9, 2004
THE SALMON is a miracle -- or maybe I'm just hungry. I'm sitting across from Jean-Paul "Bluey" Maunick, who's also enjoying the grilled salmon, and Maysa Leak, who seems slightly unsatisfied with her chicken Caesar salad. We're in a restaurant overlooking the harbor in Baltimore on a day when the sun is just downright mean and there's little hope for a breeze. I'm having lunch with the two driving forces behind one of the best soul-fusion outfits to come out of England, though Maysa is a B'more homegirl.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison | September 9, 2004
THE SALMON is a miracle -- or maybe I'm just hungry. I'm sitting across from Jean-Paul "Bluey" Maunick, who's also enjoying the grilled salmon, and Maysa Leak, who seems slightly unsatisfied with her chicken Caesar salad. We're in a restaurant overlooking the harbor in Baltimore on a day when the sun is just downright mean and there's little hope for a breeze. I'm having lunch with the two driving forces behind one of the best soul-fusion outfits to come out of England, though Maysa is a B'more homegirl.
FEATURES
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,SUN POP MUSIC CRITIC | October 28, 2003
NEW YORK - So you're inside the dimly lighted bar of the Peninsula Hotel on a breezy afternoon in Manhattan, awaiting the arrival of Chaka Khan. As you sit in a deep, plush chair by the window, you take in the ornate gold, burgundy and mahogany decor, the crystal chandeliers, the snooty waiter. You can just smell the money in this joint. You are here to chat with Chaka (yes, she's a first-name diva) about her just-published tell-all, Chaka!: Through the Fire. Thirty years have passed since the woman scored her first smash, "Tell Me Something Good," the Stevie Wonder-penned classic that snagged 2 million record buyers with its slow-grind funk and Chaka's volcanic pipes.
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