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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
Harriett M. Little, who had been assistant secretary to four chairmen of the old United States Fidelity & Guaranty Co, died Dec. 18 of cancer at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. Mrs. Little died one day after her 88th birthday. Harriett Michelmann, the daughter of a Baltimore architect and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised on Pinehurst Road. She was a 1940 graduate of Towson High School and attended the old Maryland College for Women in Lutherville.
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NEWS
By Jules Witcover | December 2, 2013
One of the best features of our quadrennial presidential campaigns is the series of debates between the major party nominees, plus another between their running mates. Voters tune in by the millions and get a better look at them than they might at any number of staged political events, whether run by the parties or by news-media sponsors. On the theory that if it's not broken, don't fix it, for the last six cycles the debates have been organized and conducted by a bipartisan Commission on Presidential Debates.
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NEWS
By Amy Gardner and The Washington Post | April 10, 2010
A majority of state Republican Party chairmen have signed a letter supporting Republican National Committee Chairman Michael S. Steele, pointing to his accomplishments in the job. "The charge of any national chairman is to raise money and win elections," read the letter, signed by 29 state committees plus those in Guam and the District of Columbia. "With over $100 million raised, victories in Virginia, New Jersey and Massachusetts, and victories in 29 of 37 special elections, Michael Steele has demonstrated that under his chairmanship the RNC has the ability, focus, and drive to lead Republicans to a sweeping victory in November."
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | December 24, 2010
Harriett M. Little, who had been assistant secretary to four chairmen of the old United States Fidelity & Guaranty Co, died Dec. 18 of cancer at the Blakehurst retirement community in Towson. Mrs. Little died one day after her 88th birthday. Harriett Michelmann, the daughter of a Baltimore architect and a homemaker, was born in Baltimore and raised on Pinehurst Road. She was a 1940 graduate of Towson High School and attended the old Maryland College for Women in Lutherville.
NEWS
October 24, 1990
Baltimore Oriole shortstop Cal Ripken Jr. and his wife, Kelly have been named honary chairmen for the American Lung Association of Maryland's 1990 Christmas Seal Campaign.The Ripkens will be featured in a television public service announcement and will be honored at the Christmas Seal Ball Nov. 30.Association officials said 90 percent of the funds raised by the campaign remain in Maryland to support the association's fight for clean air and against lung disease and their other services and programs.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,Sun Staff Writer | January 26, 1995
Bell Atlantic Corp. elevated senior executives James G. Cullen and Lawrence T. Babbio Jr. to the newly created ranks of vice chairmen yesterday, setting up an apparent two-way race to eventually succeed Chief Executive Raymond W. Smith.Neither Mr. Cullen, 52, nor Mr. Babbio, 50, is likely to move up soon. Mr. Smith, 57, is eight years away from Bell Atlantic's mandatory retirement age of 65 and shows no desire for an early departure.Until yesterday, Mr. Cullen had held the rank of president, while Mr. Babbio was executive vice president and chief operating officer.
NEWS
By David Folkenflik and David Folkenflik,SUN STAFF | April 29, 1997
Officials at the University of Maryland's medical complex in downtown Baltimore said yesterday that they had removed three senior academic leaders this year because they were insufficiently willing to address the pressures threatening the center's finances.In a joint interview, the dean of the UM School of Medicine and the president and chief executive officer of the University of Maryland Medical System said they needed department chairmen to shake free of conventional wisdom and embrace new ideas.
BUSINESS
By June Arney and June Arney,SUN STAFF | June 6, 2000
In a move to beef up the Washington-Baltimore effort to land the Olympics in 2012, the group working on the region's bid has named 14 new members to its board of directors. Among them, former Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke and John S. Hendricks, founder and chairman of Discovery Communications Inc., will serve as vice chairmen. Hendricks also is founder of a planned women's professional soccer league. "We have been very fortunate that our bid effort has attracted some of the most committed and talented members of the Washington-Baltimore community," said John Morton III, chairman of the Washington-Baltimore Regional 2012 Coalition.
BUSINESS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 22, 2004
WASHINGTON - Overcoming strong opposition from the mutual fund industry, the Securities and Exchange Commission will approve a regulation tomorrow forcing most fund companies to replace their board chairmen with outsiders who are independent, commission officials said yesterday. The new regulation, which is expected to take effect in 18 months, will apply not just to fund companies that have figured in recent investigations, but also giant firms that have not been named, including Fidelity Investments and T. Rowe Price Associates Inc. Industry analysts estimate that 80 percent of the nation's fund companies have chairmen who are also senior executives and who will have to be replaced under the new rule.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | September 13, 1996
Grass-roots Democratic Party leaders fear that political miscues by Gov. Parris N. Glendening have significantly hurt his chances for re-election, but most still believe he is capable of mounting a comeback.In an informal survey of chairmen of the Democratic Central Committees in Baltimore and all 23 Maryland counties, a majority acknowledged that Glendening appears to be less popular with voters today than when he defeated Republican Ellen R. Sauerbrey by fewer than 6,000 votes nearly two years ago.But only a handful said they want another Democrat to challenge him in 1998.
NEWS
December 14, 2010
Just as one Maryland politician was elected to head the state Republican Party, another is in danger of losing his job running the national GOP. The simple thread that connects outgoing state Sen. Alex X. Mooney's election as chairman of the state party and former Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele's uphill battle for a second term as head of the national party is money. Mr. Mooney laid out a plan for raising gobs of it, and Mr. Steele has seen fundraising lag and expenses rise at party headquarters.
NEWS
November 15, 2010
The outline of a proposal to drastically scale back the federal deficit unveiled Wednesday offers a real challenge to President Obama. The ambitious plan, which sends a whole herd of sacred cows to the slaughterhouse, is exactly the kind of thing he came to Washington promising to champion — a real solution to the nation's problems that have been perpetuated by partisan gamesmanship for years. This is something that can't be done without changing the culture of Washington. But the proposal is, just as significantly, a test for the tea party and its newly elected champions in Congress.
NEWS
By Amy Gardner and The Washington Post | April 10, 2010
A majority of state Republican Party chairmen have signed a letter supporting Republican National Committee Chairman Michael S. Steele, pointing to his accomplishments in the job. "The charge of any national chairman is to raise money and win elections," read the letter, signed by 29 state committees plus those in Guam and the District of Columbia. "With over $100 million raised, victories in Virginia, New Jersey and Massachusetts, and victories in 29 of 37 special elections, Michael Steele has demonstrated that under his chairmanship the RNC has the ability, focus, and drive to lead Republicans to a sweeping victory in November."
NEWS
February 3, 2008
Just when the naysayers were carping that the Public Service Commission wasn't tough enough on Baltimore Gas and Electric or its parent, Constellation Energy Group, relations turned downright frosty this past week. Is it real or is it melodrama? Hard to say. Constellation's threat to postpone potentially billions of dollars in investment and to sue the state for $386 million is certainly a serious matter. What's difficult to understand is how a draft interim report on the 1999 stranded-costs settlement could have precipitated such an aggressive response by a company that claims to prefer an even keel.
NEWS
By David Nitkin and David Nitkin,Sun reporter | May 21, 2007
WASHINGTON -- White House officials and top-level appointees throughout the executive branch are struggling to cope with the most intensive oversight of an administration in a decade. At least a half-dozen investigations have been launched or extended since Democrats took over Congress this year, including high-profile reviews of the firings of U.S. attorneys and the activities of political adviser Karl Rove's office. Administration figures such as Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice have been subpoenaed, although Bush aides say Rice will not testify as scheduled next month.
NEWS
January 31, 2007
There's plenty to criticize about the eight-month federal spending plan Democratic leaders will present today to their House colleagues as a done deal. The $463 billion package was crafted by the appropriations chairmen, David R. Obey in the House and Robert C. Byrd in the Senate, to deal with the GOP's failure to pass a budget for this fiscal year, now almost half-gone. Yet their plan is far more than a simple extension of current spending in order to get on with shaping a 2008 budget.
NEWS
By Karen Hosler and Karen Hosler,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 2, 1996
WASHINGTON -- If Democrats prevail in the cliffhanger race for control of the Congress, committee chairmanships would go to the party's leading liberals -- lawmakers who have been among the most fierce opponents of the Republican government-shrinking agenda of the past two years.House Minority Leader Richard A. Gephardt of Missouri and his Senate counterpart, Tom Daschle of South Dakota, have declared that their two years out of power has taught Democrats that they must adopt a more centrist approach if they regain power.
NEWS
January 3, 2007
Speaker Busch fills subcommittee seats House Speaker Michael E. Busch picked 10 lawmakers yesterday to lead the subcommittees that help shape the state budget. Slots as chairmen or vice chairmen of subcommittees are generally the lowest rungs on the Annapolis leadership ladder, but the House Appropriations Committee, which annually works through the state's $29 billion budget to decide what programs to cut and which to keep, relies heavily on its subcommittees to make decisions. That means the chairmen and vice chairmen of those groups have an unusual amount of influence over transportation projects, public buildings, education funding and other issues.
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