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NEWS
By Robert A. Erlandson and Robert A. Erlandson,Sun Staff Correspondent | April 1, 1991
TANEYTOWN -- A few tugs on the starter cord and Terry Boquist's chain saw roared to life. The spinning, razor-sharp teeth sliced into the wood like a block of cheese, scattering sawdust and wood chips.With deft strokes, the 35-year-old carver quickly scribed a few lines on the wood and within minutes had coaxed a majestic 3-foot eagle with furled wings from what had been an ordinary weathered pine log.In a clearing and shed in the woods near his Carroll County home, Mr. Boquist and two associates work at a new art form that has migrated from Minnesota timber country -- woodcarving with chain saws.
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TRAVEL
By Theresa Sintetos, The Baltimore Sun | February 11, 2013
Deep Creek Lake Deep Creek Dunk Missed the Polar Bear Plunge in January? Here is your second chance to freeze for the Special Olympics. The 15th Annual Maryland State Police Deep Creek Dunk will be held Feb. 23. After dunking into the frigid water, there will be plenty of food and a wine tasting to warm you up. Registration for the Deep Creek Dunk is noon Febg. 23, with the dunk scheduled at 2 p.m. There is a $50 minimum donation to register. You may also register online at dunkmd.com.
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NEWS
By Staff report | June 30, 1991
Hobart Reitan's sculpting tools may look and sound bizarre, but he talks about them with the confidence of an accomplished artisan."It's just a bigger jackknife," said Reitan, 54, one of a group of Carroll County men who use chain saws to carve wood.Reitan, his cousin, Terry Boquist, 35, and their friends are working in an art form that has migrated east from the Minnesota timber country.It takes Boquist just a few minutes to coax a majestic 3-foot eagle with furled wings from what had been an ordinary weathered pine log.Using an electric rasp, Reitan, a native of North Home, Minn.
NEWS
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | December 20, 2012
He has used a chain saw to carve intricate wooden sculptures for years, but when Mark Acton won a commission to hew two big new statues by the reservoir in Druid Hill Park, he wasn't sure he could pull it off. His material would be two tree stumps, each more than 12 feet tall and 20 feet around. Both were red oaks, which have especially tough wood. And when he first inspected them, he saw that each had lots of termite damage - the reason the city had cut them down. "'I thought, 'What in the world have I gotten myself into?
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Anne Arundel County Police are looking for the owners of thousands of dollars worth of power tools, lawn equipment, guns and other items that were discovered during a search of a Lothian home where two people were arrested. In the few days after police publicly invited owners of property that was stolen to contact them, police received about 100 inquiries by phone and email, said Justin Mulcahy, police spokesman. Before that, police had been able to return a few items they had recently seized from the Lothian property home to their owners, he said.
NEWS
December 5, 1995
Police logLisbon: 15000 block of Frederick Road: Chain saws, leaf blowers and a generator were stolen from Richardson Tractor early Saturday, police said.
NEWS
September 15, 1994
TCPOLICE LOG* Highland: 6600 block of Haviland Mill Road: Televisions, a microwave, a phone, a radio, chain saws, cash and more than 100 pounds of frozen meat and groceries were reported stolen from a home Monday.
NEWS
May 26, 1995
POLICE LOG* Long Reach: 6100 block of Waterloo Road: Someone cut locks off a house's detached garage and took chain saws Tuesday.6300 block of Waterloo Road: An intruder entered a house by breaking a basement window, and stole firearms, bows and fishing equipment Tuesday.
NEWS
May 6, 1994
POLICE LOG* Jessup: 8200 block of Preston Court: Someone removed glass from the front window of DAS Distributors Monday and took a cash box, police said.* Scaggsville: 10500 block of Scaggsville Road: Chain saws were stolen after someone entered a garage Monday, police said.
EXPLORE
September 6, 2011
We all have stories to tell of "Hurriquake Week" - and complaints to air about lost power and downed telephone lines. As I sat at home, just like thousands of Marylanders, waiting for lights, television, computers and phones to come alive again after Irene blew through, I took the time to listen. Really listen. I heard crickets chirping, birds singing, lawn mowers roaring, chain saws buzzing, sirens blaring and distant traffic. The most heartwarming sound heard that day was children - playing tag and football or just laughing and running through their yards and onto the streets.
EXPLORE
By Janene Holzberg | August 28, 2012
Evelyn Mogren lets the chips fall where they may nearly every day. After pull-starting her gas-powered chain saw, she deftly applies the tip to a parrot's wing, a fox's tail or a rabbit's fur coat, and their hides and claws begin emerging from blocks of pine. Fragrant chips fly everywhere like rocket-powered confetti, and sawdust blankets the patio at the side of her family's Thunder Hill Road home. It's a paradox unfurling right before an observer's eyes: a vibrating power tool, commonly used to prune trees and harvest firewood, that can just as readily finesse the delicate feathers of a bird, the fine strands of hair on an animal, or a pair of soulful eyes - when guided by skilled hands.
EXPLORE
September 6, 2011
We all have stories to tell of "Hurriquake Week" - and complaints to air about lost power and downed telephone lines. As I sat at home, just like thousands of Marylanders, waiting for lights, television, computers and phones to come alive again after Irene blew through, I took the time to listen. Really listen. I heard crickets chirping, birds singing, lawn mowers roaring, chain saws buzzing, sirens blaring and distant traffic. The most heartwarming sound heard that day was children - playing tag and football or just laughing and running through their yards and onto the streets.
NEWS
By Liz F. Kay and Andrea F. Siegel, The Baltimore Sun | June 30, 2011
Anne Arundel County Police are looking for the owners of thousands of dollars worth of power tools, lawn equipment, guns and other items that were discovered during a search of a Lothian home where two people were arrested. In the few days after police publicly invited owners of property that was stolen to contact them, police received about 100 inquiries by phone and email, said Justin Mulcahy, police spokesman. Before that, police had been able to return a few items they had recently seized from the Lothian property home to their owners, he said.
EXPLORE
By Lou Boulmetishippodromehatter@aol.com | June 9, 2011
The wind split one of our cherry trees in two, and since it was unlikely that the tree would survive, I cut it down and added it to a firewood pile, after I spent the better part of a morning getting our gasoline-powered chain saw to start and operate without stalling. There had to be a better way to saw trees and limbs, I thought. Then it occurred to me. Maybe I should try using an electric chain saw, because even though I was once dissatisfied with their power, it's been decades since I've used one, and saws have improved with time since they were first created by Perdix.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert and Janet Gilbert,Special to the Sun | November 10, 2006
Bobby Fischer may have said it best: "You can only get good at chess if you love the game." From the looks of his backyard patio, Mike Kelley of Ellicott City must be quite a chess player. He built a stone-and-granite chessboard measuring 8 square feet in a 12-foot-by-18-foot patio, and he carved all of the game's 32 pieces with a chain saw. Tucked under the canopy of a huge maple, the giant chess set has an almost surreal look - as if pulled from an early edition of Alice's Adventures in Wonderland.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | September 9, 2006
Thanks to Ernesto I had the ultimate chain saw experience last weekend. I got to tote a big chain saw, a Makita with a blade about 20 inches long. I sported goggles and thick gloves, and for a time I had the chain saw-guy walk going. The best part of the experience was I did not have to turn on the chain saw. That meant I did not have to worry about severing my limbs or chain saw kickback or the many other hazards associated with applying a whirring blade to trees. After taking a long look at the huge trees, 60-foot-tall loblolly pines, that the storm had sent crashing down on the driveway of our place in Chincoteague on the Eastern Shore of Virginia, I realized I was out of my league.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara | May 15, 1996
SAWING, IN A WAY, is antithetical to carpentry, which is mostly joining. Sawing separates, admittedly often for eventual joining, but not always. Firewood is sawn, and split -- divided, divorced.Sawing offers none of the satisfaction of hammering, none of its violent thrill. Like digging, sawing is arduous. It delivers pain to the shoulder that reveals itself the next day when you pick up the toothbrush.These days most men prefer power tools. Chain saws. Chain saws remind me of firearms. They embody violence.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | June 26, 1991
A SPECIAL relationship exists between a man and his chain saw that is almost mystical in nature.A chain saw gives a man a feeling of power and control. It is perfectly balanced. It has a pistol grip. It has a trigger mechanism. Its sharp blade gleams in the sunlight, all but crying out to its owner: "Hey, sport. Let's you and me go cut something down!"Then with a mightly pull of the starter cord, the saw roars to life -- WHONNNNNKKKKK! -- and a man goes off happily in search of whole forests to defoliate.
NEWS
By LAURA BARNHARDT and LAURA BARNHARDT,SUN REPORTER | January 31, 2006
Randy Arrington bends down to look his creation in the eye. He takes an extra minute to run his hand along the arch that forms the back. Then the 46-year-old northern Baltimore County man pulls the cord on an engine. Fountains of sawdust spray across the floor. Arrington seems oblivious to the gas fumes and the ear-numbing roar. Although his work is in one sense exacting, it's about as delicate as a Mack truck. Arrington is a chain-saw carver. The Harley of power tools, more often used to chew through tree limbs and firewood, is like a sculptor's chisel in Arrington's hands.
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