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Chain Reaction

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NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | March 8, 2005
IN JANUARY 2003, I wrote about liberal Arab intellectuals who had adopted a "big bang" theory about the coming Iraq war. They preferred any change at all to the political paralysis that gripped the Middle East. They felt squeezed between the repression of authoritarian rulers and the growing popularity of Islamists. They felt an Iraq war would break up the Mideast's political logjam. And they were right. The logjam is broken, the wood hurtling downstream. The Iraq war - and Iraqi elections - precipitated a political chain reaction whose end we can't foresee.
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NEWS
By Kevin J. Manning | April 10, 2014
The afternoon of Monday, March 31st was a typical day at Stevenson University until 2:24 p.m., when cell phones across campus suddenly displayed a text alert that we have never had to send before: "Active shooter on the Owings Mills campus. " The same warning popped up on office PCs and classroom computer projectors. Students, faculty and staff locked doors, piled desks and chairs to create barricades and hid under desks and in closets to protect themselves wherever they were on campus.
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FEATURES
By Jaimee Rose and Jaimee Rose,SUN STAFF | July 30, 2001
PHOENIX, ARIZ. -- They're just girls. They wear pink underwear and make-up and braid each others' hair. When things get rough -- when tears threaten and mascara runs -- they hug or clutch hands. They crave chocolate. They read Martha Stewart Living. They like to talk -- about feelings, about men, about kids. And when they talk, they will tell you this: Pink underwear doesn't really go with ankle chains and padlocks. These are the women of the Maricopa County, Arizona chain gang, wearers of striped uniforms, servants to the law, holders of a bitter distinction: the only female chain gang in the nation.
HEALTH
By Kevin Rector and Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 31, 2013
When John Davis' kidney began failing in January, his girlfriend's mother decided to donate one of her kidneys to help save his life. That the two weren't actually a "match" - meaning Davis' body would never accept her kidney - didn't matter. In a groundbreaking program at Johns Hopkins Hospital that is as much about nationwide networking as it is medical innovation, kidney transplants are being arranged not through isolated pairings of patient and donor, but through longer and longer chains of individuals who don't even know each other.
FEATURES
By Stephen Hunter and Stephen Hunter,SUN FILM CRITIC | August 2, 1996
I'm beginning to think the one clear signal of a rotten movie is Morgan Freeman. This distinguished gentleman has of late earned a handsome living by contributing his immense talent and dignity to the most specious of projects and, by his very gravitas, giving them a claim to serious attention they otherwise fail to generate on their own.That's certainly true of the awesomely dismal "Chain Reaction," a strictly by-the-numbers job that, sans Freeman, would...
NEWS
By Newsday | December 2, 1992
Fifty years ago today, 42 people gathered at an old squas court beneath football stands at the University of Chicago to initiate mankind's first self-sustaining nuclear chain reaction.That first controlled release of energy from a pile of uranium and graphite irrevocably opened the door to a new age, an era in which the unleashed atom could be used either to power a city or destroy it in a blinding flash; in which radiation, capable of triggering cancer, could also help treat the disease.
NEWS
By PETER D. ZIMMERMAN | December 4, 1992
Washington. -- Fifty years ago Wednesday, Enrico Fermi set )) sail on a voyage to a new world. His flotilla consisted of a cobbled-together control panel and a pile of bricks of the purest carbon inset with uranium eggs of extraordinary refinement -- the first nuclear reactor. His voyage was made entirely within the confines of an abandoned squash court beneath the stands of a Chicago football field owned by a university with no football team. According to a coded telephone report between American Nobel laureate Arthur Compton in Chicago and James Conant, chief of American war research, Fermi found ''the natives very friendly.
NEWS
By Sandy Alexander and Sandy Alexander,SUN STAFF | April 29, 2004
For nearly four hours, Scott Suko crawled around on the gym floor at Gorman Crossing Elementary School, at times laying his stout frame full-out on the hardwood as he placed one domino after another in intricate lines, zigzags and circles. Then the tap of a selected student's finger set off the chain reaction, toppling all 2,349 dominoes in just 49 seconds, to the cheers of several hundred excited grade school children who had gathered to watch. Suko was left with only "the psychological reward of knowing it worked and it looked good."
NEWS
By Katy J. Harriger | January 6, 1992
CHAIN REACTION: THE IMPACT OF RACE, RIGHTS AND TAXES ON AMERICAN POLITICS. By Thomas Byrne Edsall and Mary D. Edsall. W.W. Norton. 339 pages. $22.95. THOMAS and Mary Edsall's "Chain Reaction" provides a compelling, and often chilling, explanation for the decline of the Democratic Party and the success of the Republican Party in presidential politics.It traces the beginning of the end for the Democrats to the election of 1964. Phoenix-like, the Republican Party emerged from the ashes of the Goldwater defeat with an agenda that would, over the next two decades, give it a virtual lock on the White House and make deep inroads into the traditional Democratic loyalty of middle- and working-class voters.
NEWS
By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | February 18, 2007
Changing Light Nora Gallagher Pantheon / 224 pages / $22 Self-consciousness is not, by any means, limited to literary types. But writers and readers often seem to possess an extra dose of it. I like to think of it as a kind of third eye: Now I am shopping like a maniac to distract myself from desperate loneliness; here I am looking longingly at the oncoming train that could end my life; will the person standing next to me in this silent elevator be...
NEWS
Phil Rogers | October 22, 2011
Before the White Sox signed Adam Dunn last December, they tried to make a trade for Adrian Gonzalez. But Gonzalez went from San Diego to Boston in a perhaps-too-convenient transaction between the Padres' Jed Hoyer and the Red Sox's Theo Epstein. Both Epstein and Hoyer are now on their way to the Cubs, carrying five-year contracts in the backpacks they will tote to their transition housing in Wrigleyville. When Cubs Chairman Tom Ricketts first identified Epstein as the decision-maker he had to hire, he rejected the idea of having someone like Hall of Famer Pat Gillick in his chain of command.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | September 5, 2011
A chain-reaction car crash in Gambrills Sunday, sent seven people to area hospitals, according to Anne Arundel county police and fire officials. The crash resulted after two teenage girls attempted to cross northbound Route 3 near Waugh Chapel Road and one of them was struck by a car. When the vehicle that had hit the young girl came to a stop, another car following slammed into it, officials said. The 15-year-old girl was transported to Johns Hopkins Children's Center while a 30-year-old man, whose injuries were described as serious but non-life-threatening, was taken to Prince George's County Trauma Center.
NEWS
By Tyeesha Dixon and Tyeesha Dixon,tyeesha.dixon@baltsun.com | January 20, 2009
Jessica Granek and a group of friends hoped to fit in a ski trip yesterday before their spring semester starts at the University of Maryland this month. As the students headed downhill on snowy westbound Interstate 70 in Western Maryland, they saw an SUV turned sideways on the highway. Cars began to slide out of control, Granek said. Tractor-trailers crashed into the cars. "We're witnessing people just smashing into each other," recalled Granek, 21. "That was probably the most frightening thing, just seeing tractor-trailers out of control."
NEWS
By Doug Donovan and Nicole Fuller and Doug Donovan and Nicole Fuller,Sun reporters | May 24, 2008
Walter Sanchez and his seven-months pregnant wife, Maria J. Lizama-Sanchez, were driving south with beach-bound traffic on Interstate 97 yesterday morning when Anne Arundel County police stopped traffic for a funeral procession. A tractor-trailer that failed to stop plowed into the rear of the Glen Burnie couple's 2001 Dodge Caravan, causing a chain reaction that ended hours later with the deaths of Lizama-Sanchez and her baby despite frantic efforts to save them, according to Maryland State Police.
NEWS
By Gus G. Sentementes and Gus G. Sentementes,Sun reporter | January 18, 2008
A multivehicle crash that left five people injured and snarled traffic for two hours in Northeast Baltimore yesterday morning might have been caused by someone who had abruptly slowed or stopped on Interstate 95, causing the chain-reaction accident, authorities said. Four vehicles, including a box truck, a work van and two sport-utility vehicles, were involved in at least two collisions on the highway's southbound lanes, near the split with Interstate 895, a spokesman for the Maryland Transportation Authority Police said.
NEWS
By Susan Salter Reynolds and Susan Salter Reynolds,Los Angeles Times | February 18, 2007
Changing Light Nora Gallagher Pantheon / 224 pages / $22 Self-consciousness is not, by any means, limited to literary types. But writers and readers often seem to possess an extra dose of it. I like to think of it as a kind of third eye: Now I am shopping like a maniac to distract myself from desperate loneliness; here I am looking longingly at the oncoming train that could end my life; will the person standing next to me in this silent elevator be...
NEWS
By TRB | September 2, 1994
Washington -- Earlier this summer, Esquire published a delicious profile of Kary Mullis, the chemist who invented the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method of replicating DNA. Dr. Mullis won the Nobel Prize for this discovery in 1993. Since then, he's taken his prize money, quit science and now apparently spends his time in a California beach-front apartment attempting to use his fame to seduce women. Emily Yoffe, author of the profile, clearly regards Dr. Mullis as a strange case of male immaturity.
NEWS
Phil Rogers | October 22, 2011
Before the White Sox signed Adam Dunn last December, they tried to make a trade for Adrian Gonzalez. But Gonzalez went from San Diego to Boston in a perhaps-too-convenient transaction between the Padres' Jed Hoyer and the Red Sox's Theo Epstein. Both Epstein and Hoyer are now on their way to the Cubs, carrying five-year contracts in the backpacks they will tote to their transition housing in Wrigleyville. When Cubs Chairman Tom Ricketts first identified Epstein as the decision-maker he had to hire, he rejected the idea of having someone like Hall of Famer Pat Gillick in his chain of command.
NEWS
By RICHARD IRWIN | February 2, 2006
A chain-reaction accident halted traffic on Route 100 near Waterloo late in yesterday's evening rush and sent three people to hospitals, state police reported. The accident occurred about 6 p.m. when a driver heading east on Route 100 near U.S. 1 lost control of a vehicle, crossed the median and collided with a westbound vehicle, police said. Five other vehicles were involved in subsequent collisions in the westbound lanes, police said. Westbound traffic was detoured from the crash site for a short time while damaged vehicles were being removed and the three injured people were being treated and taken away -- two by ambulance to Howard County General Hospital, the other by helicopter to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, police said.
NEWS
By Trudy Rubin | March 8, 2005
IN JANUARY 2003, I wrote about liberal Arab intellectuals who had adopted a "big bang" theory about the coming Iraq war. They preferred any change at all to the political paralysis that gripped the Middle East. They felt squeezed between the repression of authoritarian rulers and the growing popularity of Islamists. They felt an Iraq war would break up the Mideast's political logjam. And they were right. The logjam is broken, the wood hurtling downstream. The Iraq war - and Iraqi elections - precipitated a political chain reaction whose end we can't foresee.
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