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Chain Letter

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NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | October 20, 1992
Homeless advocate Bea Gaddy says she is not too happy about a mysterious chain letter that urges people to mail donations to her post office box before copying the letter and sending it on to three friends.Over the past 10 days, the one-page plea with the heading "Pumpkins, Pennies and Poor Folks" has been showing up in local mail boxes. Ms. Gaddy yesterday said the original chain letter was drafted and mailed without her knowledge and permission."I'm a professional beggar, but I would never ask for money that way," said Ms. Gaddy, one of the city's best-known homeless advocates.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 10, 2005
She's supposed to keep her mouth shut. Brooke Valentine's doctor told her she shouldn't talk for at least four days. But the pop newcomer is on a national promotional tour for her debut, Chain Letter, in stores Tuesday. She has a list of club performances and radio interviews to knock out the week before the album hits the streets. Now is definitely not the time to deal with laryngitis. "I'm recovering," says Valentine, who's calling from Los Angeles, sounding a bit hoarse. "I've got so much work to do, and I'm so excited about my record.
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FEATURES
By San Francisco Chronicle | December 23, 1992
To heck with good-luck chain letters. Who believes in them, anyway? Judy Mendoza breaks them about as often as the moon is full, with no apparent side effects."
FEATURES
By Ilaina Jonas and Ilaina Jonas,Chicago Tribune | June 2, 1995
Songs, games, colds and ear infections are the usual things swapped during children's play groups: those gatherings of parents and their offspring created for the sub-kindergarten set to socialize.But in what appears to be another chapter in the relatively new intensity of mail solicitations to kids (read "parents with disposable income"), many participants in play groups across the country have gotten linked into another phenomenon: the toddler chain letter.Some of the missives promise a cache of books for the addressee -- never mind that the tot still can't say the ABCs -- and claim to be endorsed by the U.S. Postal Service, as well as an outfit called the U.S. Literacy Campaign, which apparently doesn't exist.
FEATURES
By Ilaina Jonas and Ilaina Jonas,Chicago Tribune | June 2, 1995
Songs, games, colds and ear infections are the usual things swapped during children's play groups: those gatherings of parents and their offspring created for the sub-kindergarten set to socialize.But in what appears to be another chapter in the relatively new intensity of mail solicitations to kids (read "parents with disposable income"), many participants in play groups across the country have gotten linked into another phenomenon: the toddler chain letter.Some of the missives promise a cache of books for the addressee -- never mind that the tot still can't say the ABCs -- and claim to be endorsed by the U.S. Postal Service, as well as an outfit called the U.S. Literacy Campaign, which apparently doesn't exist.
FEATURES
By San Francisco Chronicle | December 23, 1992
To heck with good-luck chain letters. Who believes in them, anyway? Judy Mendoza breaks them about as often as the moon is full, with no apparent side effects."
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | October 5, 1990
The funniest thing about the chain letter is how many very important people were terrified by it.The chain letter has been circulating for some months now, mainly in media circles all over America.Like most chain letters, it promises you bad luck if you don't send it on and good luck if you do.The chain letter has gone to such people as Arthur Sulzberger Jr., deputy publisher of the New York Times; Benjamin Bradlee, executive editor of a newspaper in Washington whose name I can never remember; Shelby Coffey III, editor of the Los Angeles Times; Art Buchwald, nationally syndicated humorist, and Albert Hunt, Washington bureau chief of the Wall Street Journal.
NEWS
By Joel McCord | February 18, 1991
"You are about to make at least $50,000 in less than 90 days," the headline on the six-page, typewritten letter announced boldly in all capitals. "In the comfort of your own home."It went on at great length to lay out what U.S. Postal officials called a pyramid scheme that couldn't possibly deliver the pay-off it promised.To make that money, one person would have to find nearly 8,000 others willing to keep the chain going, explained Mike Vision, spokesman for postal inspectors in Baltimore.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | November 24, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- It's an irresistible heart-tugger.Seven-year-old boy dying of a brain tumor. Doesn't have long to live. Final wish is to be listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the person receiving more get-well wishes than anyone else.A non-profit foundation that tries to grant last wishes to terminally ill children hears of his request and sends out a chain letter asking that cards be sent to the English boy, Craig Shergold.The request is so compelling, and the response is so easy, it seems no one -- including officials in dozens of state and county government offices throughout Maryland -- can refuse.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Rashod D. Ollison and Rashod D. Ollison,Sun Pop Music Critic | March 10, 2005
She's supposed to keep her mouth shut. Brooke Valentine's doctor told her she shouldn't talk for at least four days. But the pop newcomer is on a national promotional tour for her debut, Chain Letter, in stores Tuesday. She has a list of club performances and radio interviews to knock out the week before the album hits the streets. Now is definitely not the time to deal with laryngitis. "I'm recovering," says Valentine, who's calling from Los Angeles, sounding a bit hoarse. "I've got so much work to do, and I'm so excited about my record.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | December 18, 1994
A six-page promotional letter, bearing a return address at a Bel Air post office box, sounds profitable: Buy four $5 reports that are guaranteed to earn you at least $50,000 in less than 90 days from the comfort of your own home.The plan, which touts "Multi-Level Sales," has surfaced in the mail recently in Joppatowne and as far away as Minnesota, Nevada and Arizona.The plan, which appears to be a chain letter, contains elements of an investment pyramid -- outlawed in Maryland because of inevitable losses suffered by participants who are unable to recoup their original investments.
FEATURES
By San Francisco Chronicle | December 23, 1992
To heck with good-luck chain letters. Who believes in them, anyway? Judy Mendoza breaks them about as often as the moon is full, with no apparent side effects."
FEATURES
By San Francisco Chronicle | December 23, 1992
To heck with good-luck chain letters. Who believes in them, anyway? Judy Mendoza breaks them about as often as the moon is full, with no apparent side effects."
NEWS
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,Staff Writer | October 20, 1992
Homeless advocate Bea Gaddy says she is not too happy about a mysterious chain letter that urges people to mail donations to her post office box before copying the letter and sending it on to three friends.Over the past 10 days, the one-page plea with the heading "Pumpkins, Pennies and Poor Folks" has been showing up in local mail boxes. Ms. Gaddy yesterday said the original chain letter was drafted and mailed without her knowledge and permission."I'm a professional beggar, but I would never ask for money that way," said Ms. Gaddy, one of the city's best-known homeless advocates.
NEWS
By John W. Frece and John W. Frece,Annapolis Bureau of The Sun | November 24, 1991
ANNAPOLIS -- It's an irresistible heart-tugger.Seven-year-old boy dying of a brain tumor. Doesn't have long to live. Final wish is to be listed in the Guinness Book of World Records as the person receiving more get-well wishes than anyone else.A non-profit foundation that tries to grant last wishes to terminally ill children hears of his request and sends out a chain letter asking that cards be sent to the English boy, Craig Shergold.The request is so compelling, and the response is so easy, it seems no one -- including officials in dozens of state and county government offices throughout Maryland -- can refuse.
NEWS
By Joel McCord | February 18, 1991
"You are about to make at least $50,000 in less than 90 days," the headline on the six-page, typewritten letter announced boldly in all capitals. "In the comfort of your own home."It went on at great length to lay out what U.S. Postal officials called a pyramid scheme that couldn't possibly deliver the pay-off it promised.To make that money, one person would have to find nearly 8,000 others willing to keep the chain going, explained Mike Vision, spokesman for postal inspectors in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Mike Farabaugh and Mike Farabaugh,Sun Staff Writer | December 18, 1994
A six-page promotional letter, bearing a return address at a Bel Air post office box, sounds profitable: Buy four $5 reports that are guaranteed to earn you at least $50,000 in less than 90 days from the comfort of your own home.The plan, which touts "Multi-Level Sales," has surfaced in the mail recently in Joppatowne and as far away as Minnesota, Nevada and Arizona.The plan, which appears to be a chain letter, contains elements of an investment pyramid -- outlawed in Maryland because of inevitable losses suffered by participants who are unable to recoup their original investments.
NEWS
By Joanne Cavanaugh Simpson | October 28, 2009
Today's Not-So-Great-Depression has claimed a new victim: children's birthday party goody bags. And good riddance, too. I despise those little crinkly plastic bags full of $3-a-piece junk: the oddly fluorescent lizard made in China, the fake garnet ring with the finger-pinching gap in the back (isn't real garnet ugly enough?) or the ubiquitous rectangles of stickers, stickers, and more stickers. Yes, it's all junk that gets lost or tossed into piles in kids' bedrooms. Junk that is nonetheless a costly burden and time-stealer for overwhelmed birthday party parents.
NEWS
By ROGER SIMON | October 5, 1990
The funniest thing about the chain letter is how many very important people were terrified by it.The chain letter has been circulating for some months now, mainly in media circles all over America.Like most chain letters, it promises you bad luck if you don't send it on and good luck if you do.The chain letter has gone to such people as Arthur Sulzberger Jr., deputy publisher of the New York Times; Benjamin Bradlee, executive editor of a newspaper in Washington whose name I can never remember; Shelby Coffey III, editor of the Los Angeles Times; Art Buchwald, nationally syndicated humorist, and Albert Hunt, Washington bureau chief of the Wall Street Journal.
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