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Chain Gangs

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By MICHAEL COUSSONS | May 21, 1995
Your statement about chain gangs -- ''the worst possible solution to Alabama's problems'' -- in relation to prisoner treatment is inaccurate (''Chained in the Heart of Dixie'' May 8). You also use the word ''unlikely'' -- unlikely how, why or what? Finally, you imply the main reason for instituting chain gangs is to save money. Exactly how do these opinions support ''the worst possible solution?''Granted, there are economic reasons for chain gangs. A single officer can guard 30 to 40 prisoners in chains, compared to only 15 to 20 without chains.
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FEATURES
By MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY and MARY CAROLE MCCAULEY,SUN REPORTER | November 15, 2005
Never mind that no one suspects Wal-Mart of trying to squish one of its 200,000-square-foot superstores into the limited real estate space available in Hampden. But such is the anger that the retail behemoth engenders in some circles that it has become a kind of shorthand for all that is wrong with corporate America. Take Drew Heles, a local activist, and Benn Ray, an owner of Atomic Books. They sponsored a free screening Sunday night of Robert Greenwald's new documentary, Wal-Mart: The High Cost of Low Price, hoping to use it to highlight the dangers of chains, and help keep such shops as Starbucks or Quiznos out of the quirky, historic 36th Street corridor.
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NEWS
By Georgia Corso | February 24, 1997
WHILE THE editorial of Feb. 18, ''Chain gangs and prison farms,'' claims that road gangs working chained together are ''abhorrent to most Marylanders,'' a more recent survey might prove otherwise.Marylanders have come out against crime in recent months and have grown tired of living in fear of the brazen young male predators who seem to be overtaking society as a whole, having no respect for their own lives much less anyone else's.Growing fruits and vegetables for prisons would save taxpayers the cost of feeding inmates, albeit not entirely, unless we could legislate vegetarian diets.
SPORTS
By Glenn P. Graham and Glenn P. Graham,SUN STAFF | January 17, 2001
Ravens wide receiver Brandon Stokley was inactive for the first half of the season, playing catch with quarterback Trent Dilfer on the scout team. On Sunday, he was playing catch again, this time grabbing an important 13-yard pass on third down, among others, right in front of the Oakland Raiders' sideline in the third quarter of the Ravens' 16-3 AFC championship victory. In two Sundays, Stokley - who epitomizes the Ravens' season as well as anyone - will likely start in Super Bowl XXXV.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | February 15, 1997
CENTREVILLE -- A law passed to make chain gangs mandatory for prisoners in Queen Anne's County has pushed this quiet, rural Eastern Shore county into a debate that extends far beyond its neatly tended small towns and sprawling discount outlets.The new law appears to herald the first use of chain gangs in state history. Supporters say it also has made Queen Anne's County part of a growing national trend favoring cheaper and tougher prisons in response to public sentiment that criminals deserve harsh punishment instead of jails with amenities.
NEWS
By MIKE ROYKO | May 15, 1995
The warden of Alabama's dreary Limestone Prison couldn't come to the phone. His secretary said he was too busy telling the world about the many advantages of old-fashioned chain gangs."
FEATURES
By MIKE LITTWIN | May 1, 1996
Breakin' rocks in the hot sun/I fought the law and the law won."The Bobby Fuller FourWHO SAYS CHIVALRY is dead?Not in Alabama, old son, where it's alive and well.It's in Alabama that Gov. Fob (Fob?) James has fired his prison commissioner for suggesting that women prisoners, like their male counterparts, could be used on chain gangs.Fob (Fob?) would have none of that."There will be no woman on any chain gang in the state of Alabama today, tomorrow or any time under my watch," said James, who, if he'd thought to bring a cape, would have doubtless draped it right over the nearest puddle.
NEWS
By Dail Willis NNTC and Dail Willis NNTC,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1997
CENTREVILLE -- "I have been an educator in this county for 44 years," Vivian Goldsboro said, her voice thick with sadness. "I never thought that we would chain people to make them behave. I never thought I would see this."Goldsboro, a retired teacher, was one of nearly 25 people who voiced opposition yesterday to a new law requiring inmates of the Queen Anne's County jail to work on chain gangs. About 60 opponents of the plan -- which was passed 3-0 by the county commission Feb. 11 -- crowded yesterday's weekly commission meeting.
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | May 26, 1999
Chain gangs of inmates, shackled ankle-to-ankle like on Old South highways, are coming to Massachusetts.For the first time in the state, a county sheriff will lock teams of nonviolent convicts together in leg irons and send them out to clean streets, paint curbs and pick vegetables at farms.Bristol County Sheriff Thomas M. Hodgson said the inmates, dressed in bright red jumpsuits and followed by two armed guards, will learn teamwork and gain valuable life experience."This is not punitive," Hodgson said.
NEWS
July 15, 1998
CHAIN GANGS. The images remain vivid. They're from old movies such as "Cool Hand Luke" or more recent newspaper photos of a short-lived revival of the practice in the South. But America has no real chain gangs today.The exploitation of convict labor by abusive penal authorities has been, for the most part, relegated to U.S. history. In its place, mutually beneficial work arrangements have been developed.Howard County recently started one of the more innovative programs. County jail inmates are assigned to the Department of Public Works to perform menial chores.
FEATURES
By Kevin Cowherd | January 1, 2001
I WENT looking for the next Wild Bill Hagy yesterday. In cold and blustery PSINet Stadium, as the Ravens slapped the Broncos 21-3 in the first round of the NFL playoffs, I went searching for the next great Baltimore super-fan, the anointed one who could rise to his feet and rouse the beer-swilling masses from their torpor and lead them in great, raucous cheers, the way Hagy did with the Orioles 20 years ago and Leonard "Big Wheel" Burrier with the Colts...
NEWS
By BOSTON GLOBE | May 26, 1999
Chain gangs of inmates, shackled ankle-to-ankle like on Old South highways, are coming to Massachusetts.For the first time in the state, a county sheriff will lock teams of nonviolent convicts together in leg irons and send them out to clean streets, paint curbs and pick vegetables at farms.Bristol County Sheriff Thomas M. Hodgson said the inmates, dressed in bright red jumpsuits and followed by two armed guards, will learn teamwork and gain valuable life experience."This is not punitive," Hodgson said.
NEWS
July 15, 1998
CHAIN GANGS. The images remain vivid. They're from old movies such as "Cool Hand Luke" or more recent newspaper photos of a short-lived revival of the practice in the South. But America has no real chain gangs today.The exploitation of convict labor by abusive penal authorities has been, for the most part, relegated to U.S. history. In its place, mutually beneficial work arrangements have been developed.Howard County recently started one of the more innovative programs. County jail inmates are assigned to the Department of Public Works to perform menial chores.
NEWS
June 12, 1997
THERE WILL BE no chain gangs in the Eastern Shore county of Queen Anne's. It was a bad idea that is best forgotten.Earlier this year, the county commissioners in Centreville had approved a hare-brained scheme to resurrect the concept of jail inmates shackled together while on work details. It raised a furor -- and rightly so -- from groups enraged at the revival of this Old South mentality. It stirred up bitter memories of slavery in this country.Commissioners thought chain gangs would act as a good deterrent to crime, but a six-member panel set up to study the issue discovered that is not true.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1997
There will be no chain gangs on Queen Anne's County roadsides next month, the County Commission said yesterday. In a one-page statement, the county said it would not use restrained prisoners for work detail until the state attorney general advised commissioners on the legality of the practice.But that advice may not be forthcoming soon. A spokesman for the attorney general told The Sun yesterday that his office could not issue a ruling without more facts."I sent them a letter yesterday, saying we would not be able to do so until the county had decided on the exact details of the program," said Jack Schwartz, chief counsel for opinions.
NEWS
By Dail Willis NNTC and Dail Willis NNTC,SUN STAFF | March 19, 1997
CENTREVILLE -- "I have been an educator in this county for 44 years," Vivian Goldsboro said, her voice thick with sadness. "I never thought that we would chain people to make them behave. I never thought I would see this."Goldsboro, a retired teacher, was one of nearly 25 people who voiced opposition yesterday to a new law requiring inmates of the Queen Anne's County jail to work on chain gangs. About 60 opponents of the plan -- which was passed 3-0 by the county commission Feb. 11 -- crowded yesterday's weekly commission meeting.
NEWS
By Dail Willis and Dail Willis,SUN STAFF | March 27, 1997
There will be no chain gangs on Queen Anne's County roadsides next month, the County Commission said yesterday. In a one-page statement, the county said it would not use restrained prisoners for work detail until the state attorney general advised commissioners on the legality of the practice.But that advice may not be forthcoming soon. A spokesman for the attorney general told The Sun yesterday that his office could not issue a ruling without more facts."I sent them a letter yesterday, saying we would not be able to do so until the county had decided on the exact details of the program," said Jack Schwartz, chief counsel for opinions.
NEWS
February 18, 1997
PUTTING prisoners to work should be a fundamental objective of prison officials. The benefits are manifold. But not if this entails shackling the prisoners together in a scene straight out of slavery days.And yet that is what muddled-thinking commissioners in Queen Anne's County intend under the guise of making jailed inmates productive. Not only do the commissioners want inmates to pick up trash along highways and embark on other work details, but they insist prisoners do so while chained together.
NEWS
By Georgia Corso | February 24, 1997
WHILE THE editorial of Feb. 18, ''Chain gangs and prison farms,'' claims that road gangs working chained together are ''abhorrent to most Marylanders,'' a more recent survey might prove otherwise.Marylanders have come out against crime in recent months and have grown tired of living in fear of the brazen young male predators who seem to be overtaking society as a whole, having no respect for their own lives much less anyone else's.Growing fruits and vegetables for prisons would save taxpayers the cost of feeding inmates, albeit not entirely, unless we could legislate vegetarian diets.
NEWS
February 18, 1997
PUTTING prisoners to work should be a fundamental objective of prison officials. The benefits are manifold. But not if this entails shackling the prisoners together in a scene straight out of slavery days.And yet that is what muddled-thinking commissioners in Queen Anne's County intend under the guise of making jailed inmates productive. Not only do the commissioners want inmates to pick up trash along highways and embark on other work details, but they insist prisoners do so while chained together.
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