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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 25, 1992
New York's Guggenheim Museum established a downtown Manhattan presence earlier this year with the opening of the Guggenheim Museum SoHo at 575 Broadway. As a complement to the show of Russian early 20th-century avant-garde art at its upper 5th Avenue building, Guggenheim SoHo has an exhibit of Marc Chagall's murals for the Moscow Jewish Theater.In 1920, Chagall executed a set of murals on the theme of the arts for the walls, the ceiling and the curtain of the State Jewish Chamber Theater in Moscow.
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By Mike Giuliano | March 4, 2014
The Chagall Trio explores the 19th-century romantic repertory when it performs on Sunday, March 9, at 3 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. This concert in the Sundays at Three series features musicians who are well-known to local audiences. The members of the Chagall Trio are violinist Ronald Mutchnik, artistic director for both Sundays at Three and the Howard County Concert Orchestra; cellist Seth Low, who has been a member of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra since 1985 and who also is principal cellist of the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra; and pianist Andrea Sokol, whose recital engagements include the Phillips Collection in Washington and the Gordon Trust in Baltimore.
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By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | November 1, 1990
The Judaic folklore that floats through the art of Marc Chagall made him a natural for illustrating biblical stories. That's why an exhibit of Chagall's works on paper, culled from the Baltimore Museum of Art's own collection, is happily centered around an illustrated 1966 book, "The Story of the Exodus," for whichChagall made 24 lithographs.For a sense of Chagall at his lyrical best in this book, just look at the lithograph depicting the young Moses being discovered along the Nile by the daughters of Pharoah.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | November 28, 2012
A chamber music group accustomed to playing the ample repertory written for piano trio gets to explore the quartet repertory when the Chagall Trio Plus One performs for the Sundays at Three series on Sunday, Dec. 2, at 3 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church, in Columbia. Regardless of whether the number of players is three or four, there is a chamber music dynamic involved that's as psychological as it is musical. By definition, such small-scale ensembles literally work together at close quarters and need a harmonious decision-making process.
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By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Sun Art Critic | October 23, 1990
Of all 20th century artists, Marc Chagall may have been the perfect one to illustrate episodes from the Bible, as clearly shown by the exhibit "Chagall's Exodus," opening today at the Baltimore Museum of Art (through Dec. 30).Born in a Jewish ghetto in Russia in 1887, his religious heritage would have given him a natural interest in the Bible's stories. And the kind of imagery he developed, surreal and fantasylike, with an element of childlike innocence, is ideal for the depiction of events that blend history, religion and myth.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1996
It's only a 10-minute ride from the elegant brick apartment building at 7111 Park Heights Ave. to the main floor of the Baltimore Museum of Art, where Marc Chagall's "Le Petit Concert" hangs by a doorway.But the 1968 work, finished late in the career of the Russian-born painter, took 24 years to make the trip -- with detours through Miami, a mysterious warehouse near Kennedy International Airport and the secret compartment of a millionaire's yacht. During the journey, the Chagall's value jumped from $65,000 to more than $1 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | May 18, 2006
`Spontaneous and Fresh' "Dreamscapes" and other works by Wasyl Palijczuk, former art department chairman at McDaniel College, are on display at Mat About You Gallery. "I think it's [Marc] Chagall with an attitude," said gallery director Julian Manelli. "It's Chagall but it's somewhat disconcerting and more provocative." The collection is primarily oils but also includes woodcuts, lithographs and carvings of wood and marble. The exhibit features new and older pieces, such as Henri Matisse-like still-lifes Palijczuk made in the 1950s.
NEWS
March 31, 2007
HANS HEDBERG, 89 Artist worked with Chagall Swedish artist Hans Hedberg, known for his outsized fruit and egg ceramic sculptures, and for having worked with Marc Chagall, died Tuesday of kidney illness in the French resort of Cannes, his wife said Thursday. The artist was born near the small town of Ornskoldsvik, 330 miles north of Stockholm. He studied painting and ceramics in Denmark, Paris and Italy before settling in France in the 1950s. His work has been displayed in museums, private and public collections around the world.
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By Joan Nathan and Joan Nathan,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 1, 1998
The holiday that most American Jews celebrate is, unquestionably, Passover. The celebration that begins April 10 is also the one that brings out the most hand-me-down recipes. It is a time to remember ancient sagas - the deliverance of the Israelites from bondage in Egypt - and also a moment to recall personal family sagas. What better way to remember these stories than to weave them with the foods of one's family and culinary traditions of one's people?A contemporary effort at doing this is found in the recent book, "The Tomarkin Story," by Joanne Gerson, an artist living in Cincinnati, Ohio.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 21, 2001
Showtime is promoting "Varian's War," its new film about an American intellectual who saves Jewish intellectuals from Hitler's Europe, as "the true story of the American Schindler." Given the immense popularity and revered status of "Schindler's List," who can blame Showtime for trying to forge that link in viewers' minds? But in some ways (and I know some readers are never going to believe me), "Varian's War" is a more interesting and enlightened film than "Schindler." The more interesting part involves a fascinatingly quirky and cerebral lead performance by William Hurt as Varian Fry, an American magazine editor appalled by Nazi barbarism who decides to do something about it at a time when much of the rest of America looked the other way during the late 1930s.
NEWS
March 31, 2007
HANS HEDBERG, 89 Artist worked with Chagall Swedish artist Hans Hedberg, known for his outsized fruit and egg ceramic sculptures, and for having worked with Marc Chagall, died Tuesday of kidney illness in the French resort of Cannes, his wife said Thursday. The artist was born near the small town of Ornskoldsvik, 330 miles north of Stockholm. He studied painting and ceramics in Denmark, Paris and Italy before settling in France in the 1950s. His work has been displayed in museums, private and public collections around the world.
ENTERTAINMENT
By SAM SESSA | May 18, 2006
`Spontaneous and Fresh' "Dreamscapes" and other works by Wasyl Palijczuk, former art department chairman at McDaniel College, are on display at Mat About You Gallery. "I think it's [Marc] Chagall with an attitude," said gallery director Julian Manelli. "It's Chagall but it's somewhat disconcerting and more provocative." The collection is primarily oils but also includes woodcuts, lithographs and carvings of wood and marble. The exhibit features new and older pieces, such as Henri Matisse-like still-lifes Palijczuk made in the 1950s.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Glenn McNatt and Glenn McNatt,Sun Art Critic | August 26, 2001
One evening last June, during a cocktail reception for some 200 invited guests at the Jewish Museum in New York, a person or persons unknown slipped into the gallery and made off with a painting by the artist Marc Chagall valued at more than $1 million. The brazenness of the theft baffled museum officials and the authorities, who didn't discover the crime until the next morning. But they were even more disconcerted a few days later when a neatly typed ransom note arrived by mail. The painting, the 1914 work titled Study for "Over Vitebsk," was "being taken care of," the letter asserted, and it would be returned unharmed on one condition: a peaceful end to the bloody, decades-long conflict between Israel and the Palestinians.
FEATURES
By David Zurawik and David Zurawik,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | April 21, 2001
Showtime is promoting "Varian's War," its new film about an American intellectual who saves Jewish intellectuals from Hitler's Europe, as "the true story of the American Schindler." Given the immense popularity and revered status of "Schindler's List," who can blame Showtime for trying to forge that link in viewers' minds? But in some ways (and I know some readers are never going to believe me), "Varian's War" is a more interesting and enlightened film than "Schindler." The more interesting part involves a fascinatingly quirky and cerebral lead performance by William Hurt as Varian Fry, an American magazine editor appalled by Nazi barbarism who decides to do something about it at a time when much of the rest of America looked the other way during the late 1930s.
FEATURES
By Joan Nathan and Joan Nathan,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | April 1, 1998
The holiday that most American Jews celebrate is, unquestionably, Passover. The celebration that begins April 10 is also the one that brings out the most hand-me-down recipes. It is a time to remember ancient sagas - the deliverance of the Israelites from bondage in Egypt - and also a moment to recall personal family sagas. What better way to remember these stories than to weave them with the foods of one's family and culinary traditions of one's people?A contemporary effort at doing this is found in the recent book, "The Tomarkin Story," by Joanne Gerson, an artist living in Cincinnati, Ohio.
NEWS
By Joe Mathews and Joe Mathews,SUN STAFF | April 25, 1996
It's only a 10-minute ride from the elegant brick apartment building at 7111 Park Heights Ave. to the main floor of the Baltimore Museum of Art, where Marc Chagall's "Le Petit Concert" hangs by a doorway.But the 1968 work, finished late in the career of the Russian-born painter, took 24 years to make the trip -- with detours through Miami, a mysterious warehouse near Kennedy International Airport and the secret compartment of a millionaire's yacht. During the journey, the Chagall's value jumped from $65,000 to more than $1 million.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | November 28, 2012
A chamber music group accustomed to playing the ample repertory written for piano trio gets to explore the quartet repertory when the Chagall Trio Plus One performs for the Sundays at Three series on Sunday, Dec. 2, at 3 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church, in Columbia. Regardless of whether the number of players is three or four, there is a chamber music dynamic involved that's as psychological as it is musical. By definition, such small-scale ensembles literally work together at close quarters and need a harmonious decision-making process.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | March 4, 2014
The Chagall Trio explores the 19th-century romantic repertory when it performs on Sunday, March 9, at 3 p.m., at Christ Episcopal Church in Columbia. This concert in the Sundays at Three series features musicians who are well-known to local audiences. The members of the Chagall Trio are violinist Ronald Mutchnik, artistic director for both Sundays at Three and the Howard County Concert Orchestra; cellist Seth Low, who has been a member of the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra since 1985 and who also is principal cellist of the Baltimore Chamber Orchestra; and pianist Andrea Sokol, whose recital engagements include the Phillips Collection in Washington and the Gordon Trust in Baltimore.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | October 25, 1992
New York's Guggenheim Museum established a downtown Manhattan presence earlier this year with the opening of the Guggenheim Museum SoHo at 575 Broadway. As a complement to the show of Russian early 20th-century avant-garde art at its upper 5th Avenue building, Guggenheim SoHo has an exhibit of Marc Chagall's murals for the Moscow Jewish Theater.In 1920, Chagall executed a set of murals on the theme of the arts for the walls, the ceiling and the curtain of the State Jewish Chamber Theater in Moscow.
FEATURES
By Mike Giuliano and Mike Giuliano,Special to The Evening Sun | November 1, 1990
The Judaic folklore that floats through the art of Marc Chagall made him a natural for illustrating biblical stories. That's why an exhibit of Chagall's works on paper, culled from the Baltimore Museum of Art's own collection, is happily centered around an illustrated 1966 book, "The Story of the Exodus," for whichChagall made 24 lithographs.For a sense of Chagall at his lyrical best in this book, just look at the lithograph depicting the young Moses being discovered along the Nile by the daughters of Pharoah.
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