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By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1995
An air traffic controller nearly caused a midair collision in January between a USAir commuter plane and small Cessna near BWI Airport, the Federal Aviation Administration has concluded.The FAA report, obtained by The Sun under the Freedom of Information Act, for the first time reports that only quick action by the USAir pilot averted a possible crash 800 feet over Ferndale. Just 50 feet separated the two planes."He was already descending," said Paul Turk, a USAir spokesman. "The pilot had to steepen the angle of descent.
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By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2010
Joseph J. "Jay" Jaso Jr., an Ellicott City financial planner and adviser who realized a lifelong dream this year when he earned his pilot's license, was killed Aug. 10 when a single-engine Cessna 172 he was aboard crashed in Massachusetts. He was 52. Mr. Jaso and his longtime friend and flight instructor, Jack Allen Johnson, 61, also of Ellicott City, were en route to Bar Harbor, Maine, where they had planned a hiking and fishing vacation, when their plane went down. Earlier in the day, Mr. Jaso and Mr. Jackson had departed Fort Meade and had just finished refueling at Orange Municipal Airport, some 40 miles northwest of Worcester, Mass.
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NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | January 13, 1995
A USAir commuter plane coming in for a landing Tuesday at BWI Airport with about three dozen passengers aboard came within 50 feet of a small private plane one mile northeast of the runway, federal aviation officials confirmed yesterday.No injuries were reported, and neither pilot was forced to take evasive action.USAir officials and the owners of the Cessna, an oil pipeline company based in Atlanta, blamed air traffic controllers at Baltimore-Washington International Airport for the near-collision.
NEWS
By Alan Tennant | October 17, 2004
IN FOLLOWING peregrine falcons, the most affecting thing I found was the magnitude of their transcontinental journeys. During the course of these global pilgrimages, tundra-living Arctic falcons -- like the countless smaller migrants streaming northward on spring migration below our little Cessna -- awed my pilot and me with what I can only call their grandeur of purpose. It was a determination to reach some far shore that is also expressed in the epic journeys of a few mammals, reptiles and fish.
NEWS
By William Thompson and William Thompson,Staff Writer | November 29, 1992
CLAIBORNE -- Every time Ken Guinness takes his privat plane soaring over the tidewater creeks and fields in these environs, he winds up landing in the water.The wet touchdowns are intentional, though, because the 1947 Cessna Mr. Guinness bought two years ago is a seaplane outfitted with two watertight floats serving as its landing apparatus.While seaplanes have been around almost as long as airplanes, they are relatively rare in Maryland, despite the state's enormous Chesapeake Bay and many waterways and lakes.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
From the looks of the Cessna -- with broken wings and a crumpled front end buried in the woods -- it was hard to imagine anyone walking away from the wreckage. But student pilot Brian Calhan did. And he headed straight for the bar. "I had a martini with my girlfriend," Calhan said yesterday, as he recalled a terrifying descent and crash landing at Anne Arundel County's Tipton Airfield. "I'm a little sore from the impact. But I'm ready to go up again. I have my next lesson on Tuesday." Calhan, a 24-year-old salesman from Arnold, gave this account of the crash Wednesday evening: He and his flight instructor, Paul Windsor Jr. -- a pilot from Wheaton with nearly two decades of experience -- were practicing landing maneuvers at the airfield near Fort Meade.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | August 16, 2010
Joseph J. "Jay" Jaso Jr., an Ellicott City financial planner and adviser who realized a lifelong dream this year when he earned his pilot's license, was killed Aug. 10 when a single-engine Cessna 172 he was aboard crashed in Massachusetts. He was 52. Mr. Jaso and his longtime friend and flight instructor, Jack Allen Johnson, 61, also of Ellicott City, were en route to Bar Harbor, Maine, where they had planned a hiking and fishing vacation, when their plane went down. Earlier in the day, Mr. Jaso and Mr. Jackson had departed Fort Meade and had just finished refueling at Orange Municipal Airport, some 40 miles northwest of Worcester, Mass.
NEWS
By Alan Tennant | October 17, 2004
IN FOLLOWING peregrine falcons, the most affecting thing I found was the magnitude of their transcontinental journeys. During the course of these global pilgrimages, tundra-living Arctic falcons -- like the countless smaller migrants streaming northward on spring migration below our little Cessna -- awed my pilot and me with what I can only call their grandeur of purpose. It was a determination to reach some far shore that is also expressed in the epic journeys of a few mammals, reptiles and fish.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and John Fairhall and Mark Matthews and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writer Lyle Denniston contributed to this article | September 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- How tough is it to steal a 1971 Cessna 150? Not very, if you know how to fly, say those familiar with the popular craft.To begin with, the plane's keys are not as precise as auto ignition keys, according to John Frank, executive director of the Santa Maria, Calif.-based Cessna Pilots Association."The key to my Cessna fits one out of every 10 Cessnas I try it in," he said. If a plane is owned by a flight school or club, "there may be a number of keys or a system for access to keys," he said.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1996
Both engines of a Cessna 310 twin engine airplane making its approach to Baltimore-Washington International Airport stalledlast night, causing the plane to crash in a wooded area about four miles from the runway.The pilot walked away from the crash and was treated at North Arundel Hospital for a facial cut.His co-pilot was injured more seriously. He was flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he was being treated for a broken leg and possible internal injuries, Anne Arundel fire officials said.
NEWS
By Johnathon E. Briggs and Laura Cadiz and Johnathon E. Briggs and Laura Cadiz,SUN STAFF | June 30, 2003
A small rented plane, whose pilot said he was forced to circle outside restricted airspace because of a homeland security rule, ran out of fuel yesterday and crashed in a wooded area off Philadelphia Road near White Marsh, injuring the pilot and two passengers. The single-engine, four-seater Cessna 172 left Martin State Airport yesterday morning, and was returning from a trip to Western Maryland when it crashed in the trees near Mohrs Lane about 12:15 p.m., according to pilot Dale P. Roger and Lt. Vernon S. Adamson, a spokesman for the Baltimore County Fire Department.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
From the looks of the Cessna - with broken wings and a crumpled front end buried in the woods - it was hard to imagine anyone walking away from the wreckage. But student pilot Brian Calhan did. And he headed straight for the bar. "I had a martini with my girlfriend," Calhan said yesterday, as he recalled a terrifying descent and crash landing at Anne Arundel County's Tipton Airfield. "I'm a little sore from the impact. But I'm ready to go up again. "I have my next lesson on Tuesday." Calhan, a 24-year-old salesman from Arnold, gave this account of the crash Wednesday evening: He and his flight instructor, Paul Windsor Jr. - a pilot from Wheaton with nearly two decades of experience - were practicing touch-and-go landing maneuvers at the airfield near Fort Meade.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
From the looks of the Cessna -- with broken wings and a crumpled front end buried in the woods -- it was hard to imagine anyone walking away from the wreckage. But student pilot Brian Calhan did. And he headed straight for the bar. "I had a martini with my girlfriend," Calhan said yesterday, as he recalled a terrifying descent and crash landing at Anne Arundel County's Tipton Airfield. "I'm a little sore from the impact. But I'm ready to go up again. I have my next lesson on Tuesday." Calhan, a 24-year-old salesman from Arnold, gave this account of the crash Wednesday evening: He and his flight instructor, Paul Windsor Jr. -- a pilot from Wheaton with nearly two decades of experience -- were practicing landing maneuvers at the airfield near Fort Meade.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,SUN STAFF | October 19, 1996
Both engines of a Cessna 310 twin engine airplane making its approach to Baltimore-Washington International Airport stalledlast night, causing the plane to crash in a wooded area about four miles from the runway.The pilot walked away from the crash and was treated at North Arundel Hospital for a facial cut.His co-pilot was injured more seriously. He was flown to Maryland Shock Trauma Center, where he was being treated for a broken leg and possible internal injuries, Anne Arundel fire officials said.
NEWS
February 27, 1996
PRESIDENT CLINTON's substantive response to Cuba's latest outrage -- the shooting down of two unarmed civilian planes whose only "bombs" were leaflets calling for freedom -- was more restrained than his rhetoric. He ordered no military action, imposed no naval blockade, kept telephone lines open and did not shut off the money sent by exiles to families in Cuba.Yet some action was imperative. No self-respecting country can permit the blatant murder of four of its citizens to go unpunished.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | April 6, 1995
An air traffic controller nearly caused a midair collision in January between a USAir commuter plane and small Cessna near BWI Airport, the Federal Aviation Administration has concluded.The FAA report, obtained by The Sun under the Freedom of Information Act, for the first time reports that only quick action by the USAir pilot averted a possible crash 800 feet over Ferndale. Just 50 feet separated the two planes."He was already descending," said Paul Turk, a USAir spokesman. "The pilot had to steepen the angle of descent.
NEWS
February 27, 1996
PRESIDENT CLINTON's substantive response to Cuba's latest outrage -- the shooting down of two unarmed civilian planes whose only "bombs" were leaflets calling for freedom -- was more restrained than his rhetoric. He ordered no military action, imposed no naval blockade, kept telephone lines open and did not shut off the money sent by exiles to families in Cuba.Yet some action was imperative. No self-respecting country can permit the blatant murder of four of its citizens to go unpunished.
NEWS
By Laura Barnhardt and Laura Barnhardt,SUN STAFF | July 27, 2001
From the looks of the Cessna - with broken wings and a crumpled front end buried in the woods - it was hard to imagine anyone walking away from the wreckage. But student pilot Brian Calhan did. And he headed straight for the bar. "I had a martini with my girlfriend," Calhan said yesterday, as he recalled a terrifying descent and crash landing at Anne Arundel County's Tipton Airfield. "I'm a little sore from the impact. But I'm ready to go up again. "I have my next lesson on Tuesday." Calhan, a 24-year-old salesman from Arnold, gave this account of the crash Wednesday evening: He and his flight instructor, Paul Windsor Jr. - a pilot from Wheaton with nearly two decades of experience - were practicing touch-and-go landing maneuvers at the airfield near Fort Meade.
NEWS
By Peter Hermann and Peter Hermann,Sun Staff Writer | January 13, 1995
A USAir commuter plane coming in for a landing Tuesday at BWI Airport with about three dozen passengers aboard came within 50 feet of a small private plane one mile northeast of the runway, federal aviation officials confirmed yesterday.No injuries were reported, and neither pilot was forced to take evasive action.USAir officials and the owners of the Cessna, an oil pipeline company based in Atlanta, blamed air traffic controllers at Baltimore-Washington International Airport for the near-collision.
NEWS
By Mark Matthews and John Fairhall and Mark Matthews and John Fairhall,Washington Bureau of The Sun Sun staff writer Lyle Denniston contributed to this article | September 13, 1994
WASHINGTON -- How tough is it to steal a 1971 Cessna 150? Not very, if you know how to fly, say those familiar with the popular craft.To begin with, the plane's keys are not as precise as auto ignition keys, according to John Frank, executive director of the Santa Maria, Calif.-based Cessna Pilots Association."The key to my Cessna fits one out of every 10 Cessnas I try it in," he said. If a plane is owned by a flight school or club, "there may be a number of keys or a system for access to keys," he said.
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