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By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2004
Although future state funding is uncertain, Howard County's smoking-cessation program is growing, enrolling more people - including 20 workers at a private company in Columbia - to help curb the dangerous habit. "The response has definitely increased," said Shanta Williams, director of tobacco control for the Howard County Health Department. Howard's "Cadillac" program is among the most comprehensive in Maryland because it offers - free - virtually every stop-smoking aid known, and is open to anyone who lives or works in the county.
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NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2011
Many people pick quitting smoking as their New Year's resolution. But if quitting smoking was easy, most smokers would have already done it. Tobacco is highly addictive and the process isn't easy, but quitting is possible for those who really are ready and are linked to methods that work for them, says Christine Schutzman, a certified tobacco treatment specialist who leads a free Freshstart smoking cessation program at the Cancer Institute at St. Joseph...
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NEWS
By Howard Libit and Howard Libit,SUN STAFF | June 13, 1997
Saying that stronger measures are needed to stop smoking in Howard County high schools, Superintendent Michael E. Hickey and the school board said last night they will direct principals to suspend students the first time they are caught smoking and require them to take smoking-cessation classes.Also last night, the school board voted not to increase lunch prices for the 1997-1998 school year.The tougher penalties for smoking were in response to a plea from students at Centennial High School that the current policy isn't working.
NEWS
By Kelly Brewington and Kelly Brewington,kelly.brewington@baltsun.com | January 5, 2010
No one doubts that quitting smoking is one of the best ways to improve your health. But a new study by Johns Hopkins researchers suggests that, in the short term, tossing the cigarettes might actually increase the risk of developing diabetes. People who quit smoking tend to gain weight, and those extra pounds can put a person at increased diabetes risk. In fact, the diabetes risk was higher for people who gave up cigarettes than for those who continued to smoke - but only within the first couple of years of quitting, according to the research appearing in today's Annals of Internal Medicine.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 27, 1996
My husband has smoked more than a pack of cigarettes a day for over 25 years. Based on a recent examination, his doctor said that he has early signs of lung disease. I have tried to get my husband to stop smoking, but he feels it is not worth the effort because the damage is already done. Is it too late for him to benefit?Not at all.In 1994 the Lung Health Study completed a five-year evaluation of the effects of smoking cessation in 5,887 men and women from the United States and Canada, aged 35 to 60, who had evidence of mild chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)
NEWS
By Sue Miller and Sue Miller,Evening Sun Staff | September 25, 1990
If you're one of the more than 50 million Americans who still smoke, the health benefits of quitting are immediate and substantial, according to the U.S. Surgeon General annual report on smoking and health made public today.The evidence is overwhelming that kicking the nicotine habit "has major and immediate health benefits for men and women of all ages, even those in the older age groups," says the report.And, it stresses, the benefits apply to persons with and without smoking-related disease.
NEWS
February 10, 2009
If Maryland is going to tax cigarette smokers and say it's for their health, isn't the state obligated to spend some minimum amount to help them quit or prevent others from starting the habit in the first place? That was the argument heard in the State House a decade ago when the tax on cigarettes was raised to $1 a pack and lawmakers set a relatively modest mandate for anti-smoking programs. Now, Gov. Martin O'Malley is looking to cut the state's $21 million minimum for tobacco prevention and cessation programs to a mere $7 million a year.
NEWS
August 2, 2008
In his column "Up in smoke" (Commentary, July 28), Patrick Basham grossly mischaracterized the National Cancer Institute's American Stop Smoking Intervention Study for Cancer Prevention (ASSIST). I was the senior scientific editor for the National Cancer Institute's monograph that evaluated the study, and I know that, contrary to Mr. Basham's assertions, ASSIST was found to be effective. The 17 states that implemented ASSIST policy interventions had significantly lower smoking rates at the end of the program than states that did not implement the program had. Indeed, if all states had implemented such interventions, the National Cancer Institute estimates that there would be 1.2 million fewer smokers nationally today.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | February 24, 1993
Like millions of other smokers, Dan Aaronson saw the television commercials touting a new product to help people give up cigarettes."Ask your doctor," the advertisement urged. Mr. Aaronson did."Try it," said the doctor, scribbling a prescription for a nicotine patch.That was last April, when sales of the patch were soaring to the highest levels ever seen in a new pharmaceutical product -- $270 million for one quarter alone.Mr. Aaronson, who had been smoking for 36 years and was up to about three packs a day, had tried to quit before.
NEWS
By Marlene Cimons and Marlene Cimons,Los Angeles Times | June 3, 1993
WASHINGTON -- Over-the-counter smoking cessation products do not work and will be banned from the marketplace after Dec. 1, the Food and Drug Administration announced yesterday.The prohibition will affect all pills, tablets, lozenges, and chewing gum tablets that do not require a prescription and that contain ingredients not proved useful in helping smokers quit. The products are sold under such brand names as Cigarrest, Bantron, Tabmint, Nikoban, Smoke-X and others.The action does not affect the nicotine patch or nicotine gum, which are available only by prescription.
HEALTH
December 28, 2009
Metabolic syndrome is the name for a "somewhat controversial diagnosis," writes Dr. Richard Lamson, a family medicine physician at Greater Baltimore Medical Associates. It has also been called Syndrome X, pre-diabetes, and insulin resistance syndrome. Lamson writes about who is at risk for developing the syndrome and what to do if you have it: •Metabolic syndrome is a cluster of other medical conditions which, when taken together, indicate that the person has a higher than average risk of serious conditions such as diabetes, heart disease, stroke, kidney failure and related diseases.
NEWS
By Joe Burris and Joe Burris , joseph.burris@baltsun.com | December 5, 2009
Maryland is among several states whose efforts to curb smoking have apparently paid off - even as the nationwide percentage of smokers has stayed constant over the past five years. At about 15 percent, the state has the fourth-lowest percentage of adult smokers in the United States, according to a study released by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A similar study released by the agency says that nearly 21 percent of Americans were smokers last year, a number virtually unchanged since 2004.
NEWS
February 10, 2009
If Maryland is going to tax cigarette smokers and say it's for their health, isn't the state obligated to spend some minimum amount to help them quit or prevent others from starting the habit in the first place? That was the argument heard in the State House a decade ago when the tax on cigarettes was raised to $1 a pack and lawmakers set a relatively modest mandate for anti-smoking programs. Now, Gov. Martin O'Malley is looking to cut the state's $21 million minimum for tobacco prevention and cessation programs to a mere $7 million a year.
NEWS
August 2, 2008
In his column "Up in smoke" (Commentary, July 28), Patrick Basham grossly mischaracterized the National Cancer Institute's American Stop Smoking Intervention Study for Cancer Prevention (ASSIST). I was the senior scientific editor for the National Cancer Institute's monograph that evaluated the study, and I know that, contrary to Mr. Basham's assertions, ASSIST was found to be effective. The 17 states that implemented ASSIST policy interventions had significantly lower smoking rates at the end of the program than states that did not implement the program had. Indeed, if all states had implemented such interventions, the National Cancer Institute estimates that there would be 1.2 million fewer smokers nationally today.
FEATURES
By Joe Graedon and Teresa Graedon | May 29, 2008
I started taking Chantix and was surprised how quickly it cut my smoking in half. I continued with the Chantix until I finally quit. Depression was slowly creeping up on me, but nothing prepared me for what happened. One day, I woke up feeling as if I'd never be happy again. I have never felt such despair in my life. I have found it almost impossible to get help. I went to a mental-health facility, but they could do nothing unless I was suicidal and committed myself to their locked facility.
NEWS
By Madison Park and Madison Park,Sun Reporter | December 9, 2007
Students who are caught using tobacco at school will be required to go to smoking-cessation classes under a new policy approved by the county school board. The policy went into effect after the panel approved it, 5-0, at Monday's board meeting. The previous policy required a five-day suspension and a parent conference for first-time offenders. Under the new policy, students receive a one-day suspension and must attend a one-hour tobacco cessation class, and a parent-teacher conference is held.
NEWS
By Shibley Telhami | June 1, 2001
IN EXPLORING implementation of the Mideast report by former Sen. George Mitchell, the Bush administration is attempting to address two competing tendencies: The first is recognition, bolstered by insistent international pressure, that, without U.S. diplomatic intervention, Middle East violence will escalate, thus undermining U.S. interests. The second is a fear of failure driven by both the doomed diplomacy of former President Bill Clinton and the assessment that progress in Palestinian-Israeli negotiations is not likely.
NEWS
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 28, 2011
Many people pick quitting smoking as their New Year's resolution. But if quitting smoking was easy, most smokers would have already done it. Tobacco is highly addictive and the process isn't easy, but quitting is possible for those who really are ready and are linked to methods that work for them, says Christine Schutzman, a certified tobacco treatment specialist who leads a free Freshstart smoking cessation program at the Cancer Institute at St. Joseph...
NEWS
By Shari Roan and Shari Roan,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 29, 2005
The discovery that the painkillers Vioxx and Celebrex may increase the risk of heart problems wasn't just a disappointment to people with chronic pain and the doctors who treat them. The news has threatened to cut off a promising arm of research in cancer prevention. For the last decade, scientists have been compiling evidence that those and other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs seem to interfere with the early processes that can give rise to cancer, particularly cancers of the digestive tract.
NEWS
By Larry Carson and Larry Carson,SUN STAFF | January 13, 2004
Although future state funding is uncertain, Howard County's smoking-cessation program is growing, enrolling more people - including 20 workers at a private company in Columbia - to help curb the dangerous habit. "The response has definitely increased," said Shanta Williams, director of tobacco control for the Howard County Health Department. Howard's "Cadillac" program is among the most comprehensive in Maryland because it offers - free - virtually every stop-smoking aid known, and is open to anyone who lives or works in the county.
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