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Cesar Chavez

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By Chicago Tribune | April 30, 1993
DELANO, Calif. -- They were all his children, and they came to take him home.An estimated 35,000 people participated yesterday at the funeral of Cesar Chavez, president of the United Farm Workers of America, who died in his sleep Friday at age 66.Farm workers, Hispanics, old-time liberals and other supporters came from all over the country to honor the man many put in a class with Martin Luther King Jr."Cesar Chavez was a man of peace, a man of justice, a great leader for all Americans," said Dr. Dan Kelly, a member of the San Francisco Board of Education, who first met some of Mr. Chavez's workers during the grape boycotts of the 1960s.
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SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
LAS VEGAS -- In his meteoric six-year career, welterweight champion Oscar De La Hoya has been portrayed as boxing's new golden boy, a consummate pro who has captured titles in four weight classes and the first truly successful crossover fighter to win the admiration of Latin and Anglo fans.Teen-age girls swoon over the handsome boxer the same way bobby-soxers fainted before Frank Sinatra 50 years ago. He has earned $80 million and, with the strong marketing support of promoter Bob Arum, could become the richest non-heavyweight in history.
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NEWS
By FRANK DEL OLMO | May 2, 1993
Regardless of what the future holds for our union, regardless of what the future holds for farm workers, our accomplishment cannot be undone. The consciousness and pride that were raised by our union are alive and thriving inside millions of young Hispanics who will never work on a farm. -- Cesar Chavez in a 1984 speech to San Francisco's Commonwealth Club.Iwas reluctant, initially, to join the chorus writing obituaries for farm labor leader Cesar Chavez.The president of the AFL-CIO United Farm Workers Union was one of the country's best-known labor leaders, the nation's best-known Mexican-American and, in some circles, among the most admired men in the world.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1996
LAS VEGAS -- The tape of the two-round sparring session is of poor quality, shot in a makeshift ring in the back of a Los Angeles restaurant in spring 1989.Look closely and you can see the grainy images of then-lightweight champion Julio Cesar Chavez and a lanky Oscar De La Hoya, at the time a promising teen-age featherweight with Olympic aspirations.Using his height advantage in the first round, De La Hoya peppers Chavez with quick jabs. But in the second round, Chavez catches his youthful rival with a right cross to the chin.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | November 19, 1993
The TV Repairman:Flash! Julio Cesar Chavez's pay-per-view light-welterweight title defense against Andy Holligan Dec. 11 has been moved from Las Vegas to Pueblo, Mexico. See, Ross Perot was right.* The wit and wisdom of Peter Vecsey, known far and wide as "The Insider" on NBC's telecasts of the NBA, has found new territory, the USA Today columnist picking up a show on ESPN Radio Sundays from 9-10 p.m. Just a couple more weekly assignments and he'll be close to matching Larry King's on-air hours.
NEWS
By DICK MEISTER | May 7, 1993
San Francisco. -- It was a hot summer night almost 30 years ago in the little San Joaquin Valley town of Delano, California. Cesar Chavez, shining black hair trailing across his forehead, in a green plaid shirt that had become almost a uniform, sat behind a makeshift desk topped with bright red Formica.''Si se puede,'' he said repeatedly to me, a highly skeptical reporter, as we talked deep into the early morning hours there in the cluttered shack that served as headquarters for him and the others who were trying to create an effective farm-workers union.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | February 19, 1993
The challenge the best boxer around today, Julio Cesar Chavez, is taking on tomorrow (9 p.m.) at the top of the Grand ZTC Slam of Boxing show on pay-per-view is not the fists of Greg Haugen -- after all, Chavez is a 25-1 favorite -- but the claim he can fill the arena.Pshaw, you say, why wouldn't four champions putting their titles the line on one show be able to create an SRO situation? Mainly because the fight site is Mexico City and the "arena" is Estadio Azteca, seating capacity 120,000.
NEWS
By Sandra Gonzales and Sandra Gonzales,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 24, 1994
LODI, Calif. -- Like the legendary leader before him, Arturo Rodriguez stirs his followers with the farm workers' rallying cry "Viva La Causa!" as they walk past a familiar scene: laborers bending over a field in the hot California sun.His forehead glistening with sweat, Mr. Rodriguez and a group ranging from 100 to 2,000 people have marched past fields and barrios up the long spine of the Central Valley over the past month.When Cesar Chavez died -- a year ago yesterday -- critics thought the United Farmworkers Union surely would fade away.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Writer | February 28, 1995
Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield, Meldrick Taylor, Riddick Bowe, Julio Cesar Chavez, Terry Norris, James Toney, Michael Nunn and Simon Brown are among the best fighters of the past decade, and each has suffered a major setback.And then there is Pernell Whitaker, whose reputation remains unsullied despite a highly controversial 12-round loss to Jose Ramirez in 1989 that momentarily robbed him of the lightweight title.Whitaker, who will be seeking his sixth world crown against World Boxing Association junior middleweight champion Julio Cesar Vasquez in Atlantic City on Saturday, was asked how he has remained king of the hill while so many other superior fighters have fallen from the summit.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | June 7, 1996
LAS VEGAS -- The tape of the two-round sparring session is of poor quality, shot in a makeshift ring in the back of a Los Angeles restaurant in spring 1989.Look closely and you can see the grainy images of then-lightweight champion Julio Cesar Chavez and a lanky Oscar De La Hoya, at the time a promising teen-age featherweight with Olympic aspirations.Using his height advantage in the first round, De La Hoya peppers Chavez with quick jabs. But in the second round, Chavez catches his youthful rival with a right cross to the chin.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,Sun Staff Writer | February 28, 1995
Mike Tyson, Evander Holyfield, Meldrick Taylor, Riddick Bowe, Julio Cesar Chavez, Terry Norris, James Toney, Michael Nunn and Simon Brown are among the best fighters of the past decade, and each has suffered a major setback.And then there is Pernell Whitaker, whose reputation remains unsullied despite a highly controversial 12-round loss to Jose Ramirez in 1989 that momentarily robbed him of the lightweight title.Whitaker, who will be seeking his sixth world crown against World Boxing Association junior middleweight champion Julio Cesar Vasquez in Atlantic City on Saturday, was asked how he has remained king of the hill while so many other superior fighters have fallen from the summit.
NEWS
By Sandra Gonzales and Sandra Gonzales,Knight-Ridder News Service | April 24, 1994
LODI, Calif. -- Like the legendary leader before him, Arturo Rodriguez stirs his followers with the farm workers' rallying cry "Viva La Causa!" as they walk past a familiar scene: laborers bending over a field in the hot California sun.His forehead glistening with sweat, Mr. Rodriguez and a group ranging from 100 to 2,000 people have marched past fields and barrios up the long spine of the Central Valley over the past month.When Cesar Chavez died -- a year ago yesterday -- critics thought the United Farmworkers Union surely would fade away.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | November 19, 1993
The TV Repairman:Flash! Julio Cesar Chavez's pay-per-view light-welterweight title defense against Andy Holligan Dec. 11 has been moved from Las Vegas to Pueblo, Mexico. See, Ross Perot was right.* The wit and wisdom of Peter Vecsey, known far and wide as "The Insider" on NBC's telecasts of the NBA, has found new territory, the USA Today columnist picking up a show on ESPN Radio Sundays from 9-10 p.m. Just a couple more weekly assignments and he'll be close to matching Larry King's on-air hours.
NEWS
By DICK MEISTER | May 7, 1993
San Francisco. -- It was a hot summer night almost 30 years ago in the little San Joaquin Valley town of Delano, California. Cesar Chavez, shining black hair trailing across his forehead, in a green plaid shirt that had become almost a uniform, sat behind a makeshift desk topped with bright red Formica.''Si se puede,'' he said repeatedly to me, a highly skeptical reporter, as we talked deep into the early morning hours there in the cluttered shack that served as headquarters for him and the others who were trying to create an effective farm-workers union.
NEWS
By FRANK DEL OLMO | May 2, 1993
Regardless of what the future holds for our union, regardless of what the future holds for farm workers, our accomplishment cannot be undone. The consciousness and pride that were raised by our union are alive and thriving inside millions of young Hispanics who will never work on a farm. -- Cesar Chavez in a 1984 speech to San Francisco's Commonwealth Club.Iwas reluctant, initially, to join the chorus writing obituaries for farm labor leader Cesar Chavez.The president of the AFL-CIO United Farm Workers Union was one of the country's best-known labor leaders, the nation's best-known Mexican-American and, in some circles, among the most admired men in the world.
NEWS
By Chicago Tribune | April 30, 1993
DELANO, Calif. -- They were all his children, and they came to take him home.An estimated 35,000 people participated yesterday at the funeral of Cesar Chavez, president of the United Farm Workers of America, who died in his sleep Friday at age 66.Farm workers, Hispanics, old-time liberals and other supporters came from all over the country to honor the man many put in a class with Martin Luther King Jr."Cesar Chavez was a man of peace, a man of justice, a great leader for all Americans," said Dr. Dan Kelly, a member of the San Francisco Board of Education, who first met some of Mr. Chavez's workers during the grape boycotts of the 1960s.
SPORTS
By Alan Goldstein and Alan Goldstein,SUN STAFF | September 17, 1998
LAS VEGAS -- In his meteoric six-year career, welterweight champion Oscar De La Hoya has been portrayed as boxing's new golden boy, a consummate pro who has captured titles in four weight classes and the first truly successful crossover fighter to win the admiration of Latin and Anglo fans.Teen-age girls swoon over the handsome boxer the same way bobby-soxers fainted before Frank Sinatra 50 years ago. He has earned $80 million and, with the strong marketing support of promoter Bob Arum, could become the richest non-heavyweight in history.
SPORTS
January 8, 1993
Julio Cesar Chavez and three other world champions will defend their titles Feb. 20 in Mexico City's 120,000-seat Azteca Stadium, fight promoter Don King said.King said Chavez, a super lightweight from Mexico with an 83-0 record, will face Greg Haugen of the United States. Super welterweight Terry Norris of the United States will defend his title against countryman Maurice Blocker, and middleweight champion Julian Jackson of the Virgin Islands will face American Gerald McLellan.
SPORTS
By Phil Jackman | February 19, 1993
The challenge the best boxer around today, Julio Cesar Chavez, is taking on tomorrow (9 p.m.) at the top of the Grand ZTC Slam of Boxing show on pay-per-view is not the fists of Greg Haugen -- after all, Chavez is a 25-1 favorite -- but the claim he can fill the arena.Pshaw, you say, why wouldn't four champions putting their titles the line on one show be able to create an SRO situation? Mainly because the fight site is Mexico City and the "arena" is Estadio Azteca, seating capacity 120,000.
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