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NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 2004
As many as 10 million women who have had hysterectomies and who no longer have a cervix are still getting Pap tests, a new study finds. The screening Pap test looks for pre-cancerous cells in tissue scraped from a woman's cervix and can prevent what would otherwise be a common and deadly cancer. But testing most women without a cervix makes little sense, leads to false positives and wastes money, said Dr. Brenda E. Sirovich, a research associate at the Outcomes Group at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in White River Junction, Vt., and the study's lead author.
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HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2010
Thousands of women were diagnosed with cervical cancer this year, despite advances in testing and prevention. If left undiscovered and untreated, the cancer can be deadly, said gynecological oncologist Dr. Dwight D. Im, director for the Gynecologic Oncology Center at Mercy Medical Center. He answers questions ahead of National Cervical Cancer Screening Month and national Cervical Health Awareness Month in January. Question: Who gets cervical cancer, and how common is it? Answer: In the United States, cancer of the cervix (the lowest portion of a woman's uterus or womb)
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HEALTH
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe | October 2, 1990
Q**My 18-year-old daughter recently became sexually active. Her first PAP smear showed "changes consistent with HPV." What does that mean for her? Whatever the doctor told her really upset her.A**It's wonderful that you and your daughter have the kind of honest relationship that made her feel comfortable enough to share with you this personal information. She will be able to use your support in the months ahead.HPV stands for Human Papilloma Virus, the kind of virus that causes warts on the hands, feet and genitals.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2009
Each year, about 11,000 new cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed in the United States, according to the National Cancer Institute. This cancer is relatively slow-growing and may not cause any symptoms, but it can be detected with regular tests called Pap smears. If detected early enough, the cure rate - or five-year-survival rate - is about 80 percent, says Robert E. Bristow, director of the Kelly Gynecologic Oncology Service and the Ovarian Cancer Center of Excellence at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | January 19, 1992
The pain and bleeding was so bad the last year that she would have had a hysterectomy even if it meant the standard two months of recovery.But three weeks after her doctor removed her uterus using a special instrument, Joan Stickles feels ready to return to her job tomorrow. The three tiny surgical incisions required no more than one staple each and a few Band-Aids the next day, she said."If I'd had a regular hysterectomy, I'd be laid up six to eight weeks," Stickles said. "I'm ecstatic about it."
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 1996
Since it seems that more and more types of cancer can be inherited, I would like to know if a recent diagnosis of cervical cancer in my mother increases my own risk for this form of cancer.To date, there is no evidence that inherited genes play a significant role in the development of cancer of the cervix, the narrow lower portion of the uterus. Much evidence points to infection with certain human papilloma viruses as a cause, since they are detected in more than 90 percent of cervical cancers.
FEATURES
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | April 19, 1994
Mary Madrinan had already had two Caesareans when her gynecologist suggested a hysterectomy to remove fibroids and a large ovarian cyst that was causing her back pain.After two major abdominal incisions from the C-sections, she was worried about further scarring and a lengthy healing process."I'm 36, so it was difficult to decide if I wanted a hysterectomy," says Mrs. Madrinan, who lives in Hampstead.She decided to have the operation, but chose a new type of hysterectomy, which allows removal of the uterus with no major surgical incisions and preserves the outer wall of the cervix.
NEWS
By Holly Selby and Holly Selby,Special to The Baltimore Sun | January 19, 2009
Each year, about 11,000 new cases of cervical cancer are diagnosed in the United States, according to the National Cancer Institute. This cancer is relatively slow-growing and may not cause any symptoms, but it can be detected with regular tests called Pap smears. If detected early enough, the cure rate - or five-year-survival rate - is about 80 percent, says Robert E. Bristow, director of the Kelly Gynecologic Oncology Service and the Ovarian Cancer Center of Excellence at Johns Hopkins Hospital.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | July 26, 1994
The "miracle of childbirth" is preceded by a lot of other crucial miracles that enable this wondrous event to take place. Chief among these is conception. For women and their partners who have had little or no trouble conceiving, it may be hard to appreciate the frustration and heartbreak felt by couples who do have difficulty becoming pregnant.Fortunately, for many of these people, there are several courses of treatment, including one long-standing option, artificial insemination. For the details on this technique, I consulted Dr. Anne Namnoum, director of assisted reproductive technology in the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn, The Baltimore Sun | December 29, 2010
Thousands of women were diagnosed with cervical cancer this year, despite advances in testing and prevention. If left undiscovered and untreated, the cancer can be deadly, said gynecological oncologist Dr. Dwight D. Im, director for the Gynecologic Oncology Center at Mercy Medical Center. He answers questions ahead of National Cervical Cancer Screening Month and national Cervical Health Awareness Month in January. Question: Who gets cervical cancer, and how common is it? Answer: In the United States, cancer of the cervix (the lowest portion of a woman's uterus or womb)
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 23, 2004
As many as 10 million women who have had hysterectomies and who no longer have a cervix are still getting Pap tests, a new study finds. The screening Pap test looks for pre-cancerous cells in tissue scraped from a woman's cervix and can prevent what would otherwise be a common and deadly cancer. But testing most women without a cervix makes little sense, leads to false positives and wastes money, said Dr. Brenda E. Sirovich, a research associate at the Outcomes Group at the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in White River Junction, Vt., and the study's lead author.
FEATURES
By Dr. Simeon Margolis and Dr. Simeon Margolis,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 25, 1996
Since it seems that more and more types of cancer can be inherited, I would like to know if a recent diagnosis of cervical cancer in my mother increases my own risk for this form of cancer.To date, there is no evidence that inherited genes play a significant role in the development of cancer of the cervix, the narrow lower portion of the uterus. Much evidence points to infection with certain human papilloma viruses as a cause, since they are detected in more than 90 percent of cervical cancers.
FEATURES
By Kathleen Curry and Kathleen Curry,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 19, 1994
Whatever happened to the sponge? The Today cervical sponge, one of the most popular female over-the-counter contraceptives in the United States, disappeared from stores earlier this year, mystifying users and many pharmacists.The wait is almost over. The sponge will return this fall.Whitehall-Robins Inc. voluntarily stopped making the contraceptive in January, after a 1993 U.S. Food and Drug Administration report questioned the cleanliness of its manufacturing facility in Hammonton, N.J.The company has addressed the FDA's concerns and will resume making the sponges this month, Whitehall-Robins spokesman Karen Roberts said recently.
FEATURES
By Dr. Genevieve Matanoski and Dr. Genevieve Matanoski,Medical Tribune News Service | July 26, 1994
The "miracle of childbirth" is preceded by a lot of other crucial miracles that enable this wondrous event to take place. Chief among these is conception. For women and their partners who have had little or no trouble conceiving, it may be hard to appreciate the frustration and heartbreak felt by couples who do have difficulty becoming pregnant.Fortunately, for many of these people, there are several courses of treatment, including one long-standing option, artificial insemination. For the details on this technique, I consulted Dr. Anne Namnoum, director of assisted reproductive technology in the Division of Reproductive Endocrinology at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.
FEATURES
By Jackie Powder and Jackie Powder,Sun Staff Writer | April 19, 1994
Mary Madrinan had already had two Caesareans when her gynecologist suggested a hysterectomy to remove fibroids and a large ovarian cyst that was causing her back pain.After two major abdominal incisions from the C-sections, she was worried about further scarring and a lengthy healing process."I'm 36, so it was difficult to decide if I wanted a hysterectomy," says Mrs. Madrinan, who lives in Hampstead.She decided to have the operation, but chose a new type of hysterectomy, which allows removal of the uterus with no major surgical incisions and preserves the outer wall of the cervix.
NEWS
By Anne Haddad and Anne Haddad,Staff writer | January 19, 1992
The pain and bleeding was so bad the last year that she would have had a hysterectomy even if it meant the standard two months of recovery.But three weeks after her doctor removed her uterus using a special instrument, Joan Stickles feels ready to return to her job tomorrow. The three tiny surgical incisions required no more than one staple each and a few Band-Aids the next day, she said."If I'd had a regular hysterectomy, I'd be laid up six to eight weeks," Stickles said. "I'm ecstatic about it."
FEATURES
By Kathleen Curry and Kathleen Curry,Knight-Ridder Newspapers | September 19, 1994
Whatever happened to the sponge? The Today cervical sponge, one of the most popular female over-the-counter contraceptives in the United States, disappeared from stores earlier this year, mystifying users and many pharmacists.The wait is almost over. The sponge will return this fall.Whitehall-Robins Inc. voluntarily stopped making the contraceptive in January, after a 1993 U.S. Food and Drug Administration report questioned the cleanliness of its manufacturing facility in Hammonton, N.J.The company has addressed the FDA's concerns and will resume making the sponges this month, Whitehall-Robins spokesman Karen Roberts said recently.
NEWS
By Jane E. Allen and Jane E. Allen,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 10, 2001
For more than two decades, contraceptive innovations have been at a virtual standstill, leaving American women dissatisfied with what they considered imperfect choices. But a flurry of new contraceptives is finally arriving. The products - some already on the market and others still in development - are more convenient and, in some cases, as effective as sterilization (99 percent) at preventing pregnancy. Two new hormonal contraceptives - a monthly shot and a new type of IUD - were designed to appeal to women who find birth control pills inconvenient.
HEALTH
By Dr. Modena Wilson and Dr. Alain Joffe | October 2, 1990
Q**My 18-year-old daughter recently became sexually active. Her first PAP smear showed "changes consistent with HPV." What does that mean for her? Whatever the doctor told her really upset her.A**It's wonderful that you and your daughter have the kind of honest relationship that made her feel comfortable enough to share with you this personal information. She will be able to use your support in the months ahead.HPV stands for Human Papilloma Virus, the kind of virus that causes warts on the hands, feet and genitals.
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