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Cervical Cancer

NEWS
January 11, 2010
The number of cervical cancer cases diagnosed annually has gone down markedly over the past 30 years, a drop attributed to cervical cytology screening (the Pap smear). The American College of Obstetrics and Gynecology recently changed its guidelines for cervical cancer screening. Dr. Diane Boykin of St. Agnes Hospital discusses what you need to know about the new guidelines. The new guidelines state that all Pap smears can begin at age 21. This is a subtle change from the previous recommendation, which had screening begin by age 21 or one to three years after the onset of sexual activity.
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BUSINESS
By Mara H. Gottfried and Mara H. Gottfried,CONTRIBUTING WRITER | January 15, 2000
Gaithersburg-based Digene Corp. said yesterday that it has come to an agreement with Laboratory Corporation of America Holdings to use its HPV test, which helps detect cervical cancer in women. Vandana K. Bapna, a biotechnology analyst at Hunt Valley-based Offutt Securities, called the deal significant for Digene, a biotechnology company that focuses on DNA and RNA technology for the detection, screening and monitoring of sexually transmitted diseases. "LabCorp is one of the largest reference testing labs in the United States," Bapna said.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | May 12, 1999
Digene Corp. a Beltsville-based developer of DNA-based medical tests for diseases, said yesterday that drug giant Abbott Laboratories will act as the marketer and distributor for its tests in Europe, the Middle East and Africa.Among the tests Abbott will market are Digene's diagnostic products for hepatitis B and the human papillomavirus (HPV), considered a precursor to cervical cancer.In the United States, Abbott, one of the world's largest marketers of medical diagnostics, will launch sales of Digene's new automated tests for chlamydia, a urinary tract infection, and gonorrhea, a sexually transmitted disease.
HEALTH
By Meredith Cohn | January 27, 2012
The percentage of Americans screened for cancer isn't meeting national targets, and the numbers are even worse for minorities, according the first federal study looking at disparities among Asiand and Hispanic groups. The report by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Cancer Institute showed breast cancer screening rates were 72.4 percent, below the 81 percent target set in a national health plan called Healthy People 2020.  It was 83 percent for cervical cancer, missing the 93p ercent mark, and colorectal screening was 58.6 percent, missing hte 70.5 percent target.
BUSINESS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,SUN STAFF | March 12, 2002
Digene Corp., a maker of medical diagnostic tests, expects the marketing potential of its DNA-based cervical cancer test to increase 10-fold if the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approves expanded use. The Gaithersburg-based company cleared a major hurdle Friday when an FDA advisory panel recommended that Digene's test, with conditions, be used in conjunction with the Pap smear as a primary detector of cervical cancer. The FDA generally follows the advice of its advisory panels, which are made up of outside experts.
BUSINESS
By Rona Kobell and Rona Kobell,SUN STAFF | May 4, 2000
Digene Corp., the Gaithersburg-based maker of medical test kits, announced yesterday that Kaiser Permanente will use its flagship product to screen for cervical cancer. The 10-year-old company's Digital Hybrid Capture HPV test detects the human papillomavirus, a frequent precursor to cervical cancer. The HPV test is one of a handful of products Digene is developing, but it's the most successful so far, said Digene President Charles Fleischman. The test played prominently in Digene's earnings for the quarter ended March 31, which the company also released yesterday.
NEWS
By Mary Knudson | November 25, 1990
Rural Somerset County is full of folks like Joe Reading, who used to dip his bare hands in DDT, still uses other chemicals on his farm and bathes his dinner greens in bacon grease. And Lewis W. Jones, a medical clinic director who smoked two packs of cigarettes a day until recently. And Weltonia Engram, who avoided getting Pap smears because she was afraid she might learn she had cancer.Smoking, diets loaded with fat and salt, exposure to cancer-causing chemicals and poor access to health care may be clues to why one in 321 Somerset residents dies of cancer every year.
NEWS
January 14, 2007
Regular pelvic examinations urged Dr. Andrew Bernstein, health officer for Harford County, is urging women to have regular pelvic exams and pap tests to screen for cervical cancer. January is National Cervical Cancer Awareness Month. Women should also report any of the following symptoms to their physicians immediately: unusual discharge; blood spots or light bleeding other than a normal period; or bleeding or pain after sex, douching or a pelvic exam. The Health Department is sponsoring gynecological exams for women at no cost who meet program guidelines.
BUSINESS
By Mark Guidera and Mark Guidera,SUN STAFF | June 6, 1999
At health clinics operated by Omnia Inc. in Chicago and the Northeast, women are routinely tested for cervical cancer using that stalwart of gynecology, the Pap smear, and a new, more sensitive test that many medical experts believe could one day replace it.Philadelphia-based Omnia, which manages private gynecology practices serving 400,000 women, is the first managed care organization in the United States to use the new test in conjunction with the Pap....
NEWS
By Dennis O'Brien and Dennis O'Brien,SUN STAFF | August 27, 2004
Maryland health officials are reviewing the way many of the state's medical labs are regulated after finding such serious problems at a Rosedale facility that 3,000 patients are being offered retesting to check the accuracy of results for sexually transmitted diseases. Inspectors discovered so many violations of state and federal regulations at Reference Pathology Services of Maryland that regulators ordered the operation to shut down and issued a scathing report. One federal official concluded that the lab poses "an immediate jeopardy to the health of its patients and that of the general public."
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