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Certified Financial Planner

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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2012
Financial advisers often have an alphabet of professional designations behind their names, but the dominant one remains "CFP," or certified financial planner. The CFP Board, which sets the national standards for financial planners, has announced in the past year or so a series of changes meant to strengthen the designation. It beefed up the ethics curriculum and hired a director of investigations to make sure planners comply with standards. And this summer, it will begin disclosing whether members have filed for bankruptcy within the past five years — something that could affect a consumer's decision to hire them.
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BUSINESS
By Eileen Ambrose, The Baltimore Sun | May 6, 2012
Financial advisers often have an alphabet of professional designations behind their names, but the dominant one remains "CFP," or certified financial planner. The CFP Board, which sets the national standards for financial planners, has announced in the past year or so a series of changes meant to strengthen the designation. It beefed up the ethics curriculum and hired a director of investigations to make sure planners comply with standards. And this summer, it will begin disclosing whether members have filed for bankruptcy within the past five years — something that could affect a consumer's decision to hire them.
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BUSINESS
By Jane Bryant Quinn and Jane Bryant Quinn,Washington Post Writers Group | May 12, 1997
IF YOU HAVE a complaint against a certified financial planner (CFP), there's a grievance procedure you may not have known about. The CFP Board of Standards in Denver is putting more effort into enforcing its code of ethics.Sanctions for wrongdoers are mild, to say the least. Injured consumers should first complain in writing to their state securities office or to the National Association of Securities Dealers (NASD) in Washington, D.C., if the planner sells mutual funds or variable annuities.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,chicago tribune | October 12, 2008
Starting out in investing right now might seem irrational, but many investment experts consider this an opportune time. Financial trauma produces long-term bargains, if you can cope with uncertainty. You'll move gradually into a market that has punished good companies along with the bad, which is the foundation of a value-oriented strategy. "These ... opportunities represent a great time if you are a long-term investor and fundamentally believe in our free-enterprise system," said Mark Brown, a certified financial planner with Brown & Tedstrom in Denver.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2006
Alliances ConnectYourCare and PFPC, a unit of PNC Financial Services Group, have teamed to provide banks and investment industry firms with solutions for the administration of health savings accounts (HSAs). Certifications Sheryl Sagel of Gateway Capitol Financial, an office of MetLife Financial Services, was accorded the designation of certified financial planner by the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards. Expansions Geo-Technology Associates Inc., based in Harford County, has formed a subsidiary, GTA Environmental Services Inc. The new, Laurel-based company specializes in removal of underground and above-ground storage tanks, contaminated soil and other remediation services.
NEWS
August 7, 2000
UM's Steinhilber receives award from agriculture societies Columbia resident Patricia Steinhilber has received a proclamation commending her work at the University of Maryland College of Agriculture and Natural Resources. As program coordinator of the agricultural nutrient management program for University of Maryland Cooperative Extension, Steinhilber has worked to increase agricultural productivity while preventing adverse environmental effects. For her efforts, Steinhilber received the Extension/Industry Award from the Soil Science Society of America and the Northeastern branch of the American Society of Agronomy in June.
NEWS
September 25, 2000
Greenebaum firm honored for design excellence Stuart Greenebaum, president of the Ellicott City-based company Greenebaum and Rose Associates Inc., was keynote speaker at an Award of Excellence ceremony Sept. 18 sponsored by the Land Development Council of the Home Builders Association of America. The ceremony, which was held at Baltimore Museum of Industry, recognizes excellence in design and quality of land developments. Greenebaum's company was recognized for Section 3 of its Howard County development, Governors Run, on U.S. 40. Eastern Shore man to head planning office Gary Desjardins, a certified financial planner and a resident of the Eastern Shore, will manage a new office of the Columbia-based asset management, estate and financial planning firm Eichelberger, Griesser, Eddy & Alms.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | June 17, 2007
Who you are influences how you invest. People don't think exactly alike about money, which is a painful reality in many households. Although better judgment or spousal pressure can overcome questionable tendencies, the struggle with one's inner self is never easy. We love or hate money, we fear or worship it, but we certainly never ignore it, said Stacy Francis, a certified financial planner and president of Francis Financial Inc. in New York. Money personalities explain people's behavior in terms of earning, spending, gifting, borrowing, saving and investing.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | October 24, 1990
Touch all bases. Dot all i's and cross all t's.Careful investment strategy for turbulent times dictates following this relentless directive of the nation's financial planners: Diversify. Makes sense, since various investments perform differently at different times.In 1990, diversity is taken very seriously. The 1987 stock market crash, the twists of the bond markets and general economic volatility have made it mandatory for advisers to do their homework.With recession looming, most plannersrecommend keeping three to six months of expenses available -- just in case.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey | October 24, 2004
Americans sometimes fib about how long it takes them to get to work, their weight, their age, their drinking habits, how much TV they watch and whether they ate dessert last night. So it's hardly a stretch to accept that they would fib to a financial adviser about their income, savings or investments. Maybe they don't want anyone else to know their business. Maybe they want to seem like high rollers. Maybe they can't be honest with themselves or anyone else about how much money they're capable of saving or investing.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | July 13, 2008
Hard economic times can call for cold, hard cash. Whether financial pressure comes from rising gasoline and grocery bills, from a period without steady income or from a mortgage burden, emergency dollars are a necessity. Ideally, people have established liquid emergency funds. In addition, spending needs to be reduced in difficult times. Beyond that, strategic decisions must be made on where to go next for money. Credit cards are a terrible source for emergency dollars because they worsen the financial situation through high interest rates and mounting debt.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media services | July 22, 2007
Asset drift can turn your 401(k) plan into a complete stranger when you're not looking. That's why, experts say, you must keep an eye on it. Dramatic success of oil and drilling companies, for example, may have so bloated any funds benefiting from that area that your retirement portfolio could be vulnerable to a downturn. The same could be said for mid-cap funds, which have left their large-cap counterparts in the dust. Check the percentage breakdown of your retirement portfolio periodically to see if it is still in keeping with your original goals and mix of fund types.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | June 17, 2007
Who you are influences how you invest. People don't think exactly alike about money, which is a painful reality in many households. Although better judgment or spousal pressure can overcome questionable tendencies, the struggle with one's inner self is never easy. We love or hate money, we fear or worship it, but we certainly never ignore it, said Stacy Francis, a certified financial planner and president of Francis Financial Inc. in New York. Money personalities explain people's behavior in terms of earning, spending, gifting, borrowing, saving and investing.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Leckey and Andrew Leckey,Tribune Media Services | June 3, 2007
You already may be well along the road to a fine retirement. You started early, invested regularly, used tax-advantaged retirement accounts, didn't borrow from them, diversified your assets, monitored them and didn't over invest in your employer's own stock. But before you become cocky during that final approach to your retirement destination, realize the last stretch of road can have potholes, speed bumps and rough pavement. Maybe even a boulder or two. Among the potential issues: Hazard No. 1: Divorce obliterates many retirement plans.
BUSINESS
By Janet Kidd Stewart and Janet Kidd Stewart,Tribune Media Services | April 1, 2007
When Stacie Lykins and Misti Mohrenne bought their home last summer, they thought they were on their way to the American dream. But in a short time, the Eustis, Fla., couple hit some bumps in the road. A property reassessment sent their monthly home payments way above their projections, and a cooling real estate market along with a no-money-down loan means they could take a small loss on the house if they sold now. Meanwhile, they've been piling up credit-card debt and have two relatively new vehicles with loans totaling more than their current value.
BUSINESS
By Andrew Countryman and Andrew Countryman,Chicago Tribune | March 4, 2007
The Dow sets record after record, only to sink 416 points in a day. It then endures some big swings during the next few days before losing more ground. Forgive people if they feel a little whipsawed. What's an investor to do? Don't panic, financial planners and market analysts say. But don't be complacent, either. There are some steps investors can take to protect themselves and potentially profit from the current climate, these experts say. Planners and analysts say it's a good time for investors to assess their risk tolerance and make sure their portfolios aren't too heavy in stocks after the substantial run-up of recent months.
FEATURES
August 18, 1993
The bills have been paid. The refrigerator stocked. Everyone's wardrobe is in passable shape. Now, the money left over is yours, all yours to spend as you darn well please.Was that the sound of a groan? You say there is no money left after taking care of basic necessities?According to a recent article in American Demographics magazine, most Americans actually have more bucks to spend on frills than they think. The problem is managing money to make the most of it.We want to see if they're right.
BUSINESS
By JANET KIDD STEWART and JANET KIDD STEWART,TRIBUNE MEDIA SERVICES | August 13, 2006
Retirement advice keeps getting cheaper, but it still could cost you. Baltimore's T. Rowe Price Group Inc. is the latest of the mutual fund supermarkets to roll out or expand financial planning services aimed at managing baby boomer retirement dollars. Competitors Fidelity Investments and Vanguard Group - as well as myriad other investment firms - have already trotted out advice products, ranging from free to about $1,000. But is the advice any good, and just how much can you expect from the services?
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