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By Liz Atwood and Liz Atwood,Staff Writer | May 27, 1992
The Maryland Port Administration has reached an agreement with Ceres Marine Terminals to create a private "mini-terminal" at the Dundalk Marine Terminal.The terminal will be similar to one Maersk Inc./Universal Maritime Service Corp. has operated at the Dundalk terminal since November.Under the agreement, approved yesterday by the Board of Public Works, the MPA and Ceres will pay for improvements and modifications to an 88-acre site, which will be leased to Ceres.The MPA will pay $800,000 of the $1.5 million cost to build a computerized gate, fence the area and make other improvements.
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BUSINESS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | June 3, 2010
Stevedoring company Ceres Terminals Inc. is expanding its cargo operations at the port of Baltimore, leasing an additional 12 acres at Dundalk Marine Terminal from the Maryland Port Administration, state officials said Thursday. Ceres now leases 5 acres at Dundalk from the port administration. The company will be handling roll-on, roll-off cargo business — typically construction and farm equipment — for Hoegh Autoliners, which is moving its European Service vessels to the Dundalk terminal.
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BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | August 24, 1996
An administrative law judge for the Federal Maritime Commission has ruled that the Maryland Port Administration violated the Shipping Act of 1984 by discriminating against one of the port's major customers.Judge Charles E. Morgan said that price breaks the state of Maryland gave Maersk Line for cranes, wharfage and terminal space hurt Ceres Marine Terminal, a stevedoring company that competes with Maersk and its subsidiary, Universal Maritime Service Corp.In a dispute that ultimately could cost the MPA substantial financial damages, the judge ruled that the MPA also discriminated against Ceres by giving "unreasonable preference" to Hale Container Line Inc., a Baltimore-based barge operation.
BUSINESS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | July 1, 2009
The port of Baltimore has concentrated its search for a private partner to operate the state-owned Seagirt Marine Terminal on two competitors - a vital step in preparation for the expected widening of the Panama Canal in 2014. The Maryland Port Association said Tuesday that Ceres Terminals Inc./Alinda Capital Partners LLC and Ports America Group/Highstar Capital have passed the qualification process and will be permitted to submit bids to run the Southeast Baltimore terminal. The lead partners are both familiar names in the Baltimore port.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | May 1, 1997
Capping a longtime battle with Maryland port officials, Ceres Marine Terminal Inc. said yesterday that it will stop handling containers at Dundalk Marine Terminal.The Hoboken, N.J.-based international stevedore said it has been unable to reach an agreement on a new five-year lease for its 88-acre Dundalk terminal and it reiterated complaints that the Maryland Port Administration has long discriminated in its rates against Ceres, a charge upheld last summer by a federal administrative judge.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2005
James J. White, who left the port of Baltimore because of political tension with his new bosses in the Ehrlich administration, began a new job yesterday in New Jersey with a company that does business with about a dozen U.S. ports, including Baltimore's. White became senior vice president and chief operating officer of the Weehawken, N.J.-based stevedoring and terminal operating company Ceres Terminals Inc. The move eases the fears of some in Baltimore's maritime industry who thought White might take his reputation and contacts to a competing port.
BUSINESS
By Blair S. Walker | April 18, 1991
The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission has filed a lawsuit accusing a port stevedoring company of discriminating against three predominantly black groups of dockworkers and of firing them after the EEOC validated their claims.In an action filed in September in U.S. District Court in Baltimore, Ceres Marine Terminals Inc. is also accused of firing three predominantly white groups of stevedores in a retaliatory move stemming from the EEOC's findings.An attorney representing Ceres said his client did not engage in discriminatory practices and has evidence to prove it.In all, 96 dockworkers were fired by Ceres.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,Sun Staff Writer | April 16, 1994
In an unprecedented move that ultimately could create havoc at the rebounding port of Baltimore, the state is threatening to evict the port's largest stevedoring company.The dispute between the Maryland Port Administration -- the agency that oversees operation of the state-owned terminals -- and Ceres Terminals Inc. centers on nearly $1 million in payments thatCeres allegedly owes the state in connection with its operation at Dundalk Marine Terminal.In an April 7 letter, the MPA demanded the money within 10 days and threatened to take all actions, including eviction, to remedy the situation.
BUSINESS
By Kim Clark and Kim Clark,Staff Writer | October 28, 1992
A federal lawsuit charging a Baltimore stevedoring company with race discrimination has been dropped for lack of evidence, but some black longshoremen claimed yesterday that favoritism continues to plague the port.The Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) said yesterday that it gave up on the lawsuit it had filed last year, alleging that the Ceres Corp. was giving less work to three gangs of black longshoremen than to gangs made up predominantly of white workers.Longshoremen, who move cargo on and off ships, are organized into "gangs" of 17 workers each.
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1998
The state Board of Public Works yesterday approved a three-year, $35.4 million contract for ITO Corp. of Baltimore to continue operating the Seagirt Marine Terminal.Also, Tay Yoshitani, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration, said Italia Line would be returning to the port next month after an absence of more than a decade. Details of the line's plans were not immediately available.ITO has operated Seagirt since it opened in 1990, said Linda Jordan, manager of communications for the MPA, which owns the state's five marine terminals.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,Sun reporter | September 27, 2007
The weather in Florida looked promising today for a sunrise launch of NASA's Dawn mission to explore the mysterious dwarf planet Ceres and the giant asteroid Vesta. Liftoff from the Cape Canaveral Air Force Station was expected as early as 7:20 a.m., just seven minutes after sunrise. The Delta II rocket and its nine strap-on boosters are to carry the unmanned spacecraft to a 100-mile-high Earth orbit in just nine minutes. About an hour later, Dawn's third stage is to ignite to push the 1,600-pound spacecraft on its way toward the asteroid belt, between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,sun reporter | July 5, 2007
NASA scientists hope to celebrate Independence Day a few days late this year, with a spectacular launch of the Dawn mission Saturday -- the world's first flight to the mysterious dwarf planet Ceres and the asteroid Vesta. It is an ambitious enterprise -- the first from Earth to orbit two celestial bodies in succession. The journey is possible only because of Dawn's exotic ion-propulsion engine. Its astonishing efficiency will carry it 3 billion miles on less than 72 gallons of fuel.
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | March 28, 2006
LOS ANGELES -- The Jet Propulsion Laboratory's Dawn mission to the asteroids Ceres and Vesta, canceled this month, was given a reprieve yesterday when NASA officials said they would reinstate the project despite cost overruns and technical problems. The cost overruns are not unprecedented given the complexity of the mission, and the technical hurdles are well on the way to being overcome, Rex Geveden, associate administrator of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, said in a teleconference.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | March 8, 2005
James J. White, who left the port of Baltimore because of political tension with his new bosses in the Ehrlich administration, began a new job yesterday in New Jersey with a company that does business with about a dozen U.S. ports, including Baltimore's. White became senior vice president and chief operating officer of the Weehawken, N.J.-based stevedoring and terminal operating company Ceres Terminals Inc. The move eases the fears of some in Baltimore's maritime industry who thought White might take his reputation and contacts to a competing port.
NEWS
March 19, 2002
IN THE BROADEST sense, closing government records invites a fatal erosion of democracy. If citizens are denied access, officials could hide incompetence as well as malfeasance. It's far more than abstract hand-wringing. A Baltimore company's ability to examine a lease between one of its competitors and the Maryland Port Administration resulted in a lawsuit that may allow the company to recover millions of dollars in penalties owed as the result of unfair terms granted to a competitor.
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 25, 2001
For 200 years the giant asteroid Ceres has held the title as the largest known "minor planet" in the solar system. Ceres is a spherical space rock orbiting in the asteroid belt between Mars and Jupiter. It is nearly 600 miles in diameter, roughly the distance from Baltimore to Chicago. Now a team of European astronomers is claiming that Ceres has been eclipsed in size by a newly discovered object, found near the orbit of Pluto. The new asteroid could be as big as 870 miles across, according to calculations by a team led by Gerhard Hahn of the German Aerospace Center in Berlin.
BUSINESS
By John H. Gormley Jr | November 30, 1991
Longshoremen in the port of Baltimore loaded 90 large pieces of agricultural equipment onto the NOSAC Sun this week, a shipment that maritime executives hope will persuade the Midwestern manufacturer of the machinery, J. I. Case, to become a regular user of the port."
BUSINESS
By M. William Salganik and M. William Salganik,SUN STAFF | April 16, 1998
The state Board of Public Works yesterday approved a three-year, $35.4 million contract for ITO Corp. of Baltimore to continue operating the Seagirt Marine Terminal.Also, Tay Yoshitani, executive director of the Maryland Port Administration, said Italia Line would be returning to the port next month after an absence of more than a decade. Details of the line's plans were not immediately available.ITO has operated Seagirt since it opened in 1990, said Linda Jordan, manager of communications for the MPA, which owns the state's five marine terminals.
BUSINESS
By Suzanne Wooton and Suzanne Wooton,SUN STAFF | October 15, 1997
In a decision that could cost the state of Maryland millions of dollars, the Federal Maritime Commission has ruled that the Maryland Port Administration violated the Shipping Act of 1984 by discriminating against one of the port's major customers.The commission said price breaks the state gave Maersk Line for cranes, wharfage and terminal space hurt Ceres Marine Terminal, a stevedoring company that competes with Maersk and its subsidiary, Universal Maritime Service Corp.The FMC also ruled that the MPA gave "unreasonable preference" to Hale Container Line Inc., a Baltimore barge company.
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