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By GLENN MCNATT | May 6, 1999
The strong ceramics community in the Washington area is the subject of an exciting group show at Baltimore Clayworks in Mount Washington. The juried exhibition, titled "D.C. Clay," features 12 regional sculptors and potters and includes both emerging and established artists.Pieces range from Ramon Camarillo's oversized raku pots to Amy Butcher Parker's life-size figures and Judy Colwell's intricately painted plates. A must-see for ceramics enthusiasts. The exhibition runs through May 29.Baltimore Clayworks is at 5706 Smith Ave. in Mount Washington.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
A new exhibit opening Sunday at the Walters Art Museum is an homage to unsteady hands and uncertain tempers, to chips and nicks, to the inconsistent and unfinished. In "Designed for Flowers: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics," many of the 60 vases on display contain an obvious and intentional flaw. One artist, who is known for kicking each pot with a boot before it is fired, has deliberately gouged a small V-shaped segment from his vessel's rim. In a vase by another artist, the upper lip of the vase departs from a uniform circle and wobbles slightly.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | November 20, 1997
This is the weekend of Winterfest 1997, Baltimore Clayworks' annual holiday show and tour. At the Clayworks gallery, the Holiday National Invitational Exhibition opens tomorrow evening, presenting 19 ceramics artists and running until Christmas Eve. Artists with work in the show hail from as far away as Maine, Florida, Texas, Nebraska and Montana. This Saturday and Sunday there will be a tour of local artists' homes and studios, featuring three studio-homes in the Towson area, one studio-gallery in Fells Point and an artist display and sale at the USF&G's Mount Washington Conference Center.
NEWS
By Mike Giuliano | November 23, 2012
You can make a case that the vases in "Triple Vision" are meant to be admired as much as used. The three artists showcased in this Columbia Art Center exhibit make vases, platters and other ceramic objects that often have whimsical shapes or surface decoration. Although Pam Hannasch and Dick Roepke generally make functional pieces, they also have playful tendencies. As for Scott McNabb, well, his nonfunctional ceramic art can be used to generate a smile. It's nice to walk around the gallery and see how these three distinctive artistic identities are shaped; however, some of their pieces are displayed on such low pedestals that it's rather awkward to try looking at them.
ENTERTAINMENT
By John Dorsey | June 27, 1996
Janathel Shaw works in ceramics, and brings to her sculpture the fire of conviction that the title of her current show at Clayworks implies: ". . . and the struggle continues" covers a range of issues including genocide, racism, mothers and children and the ideal of community unification. "My basic desire," she says, "is to analyze the root causes of dissension in the African-American community and to seek solutions." Shaw received the 1995 Baltimore Clayworks Lormina Salter Fellowship, which allowed her to develop this show.
EXPLORE
July 28, 2011
Erica Kempler , of Columbia, has two ceramics pieces on juried exhibit at the First Street Gallery in New York City, and two other ceramics pieces on juried exhibit at the Bedford Gallery, in Walnut Creek, Calif. She is a 2005 graduate of Wilde Lake High School and a 2009 graduate of Frostburg State University. Kempler is currently a Masters of Find Arts student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Ethel Sturgis , of Columbia, celebrated her 95th birthday July 21, 2011.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Mary Carole McCauley, The Baltimore Sun | February 22, 2014
A new exhibit opening Sunday at the Walters Art Museum is an homage to unsteady hands and uncertain tempers, to chips and nicks, to the inconsistent and unfinished. In "Designed for Flowers: Contemporary Japanese Ceramics," many of the 60 vases on display contain an obvious and intentional flaw. One artist, who is known for kicking each pot with a boot before it is fired, has deliberately gouged a small V-shaped segment from his vessel's rim. In a vase by another artist, the upper lip of the vase departs from a uniform circle and wobbles slightly.
FEATURES
By John Dorsey and John Dorsey,Art Critic | June 10, 1993
Jack Lenor Larsen is a well-known New York-based interio designer particularly renowned for his textile designs. He has also assembled a collection of ceramics, and both of these aspects of his interests are on view in the National Museum of Ceramic Art's latest show, "Jack Lenor Larsen: Designer/Collector -- A Retrospective," curated by J. Richard N. Taylor, who is the museum's president and also an interior designer.The exhibit is a mistake.While Mr. Larsen's textiles are creative and beautiful, this is a ceramics museum; therefore, the ceramics must justify the show, and they don't.
NEWS
By Cassandra A. Fortin and Cassandra A. Fortin,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | June 19, 2005
When Deborah Bedwell watched Taiwanese ceramics artist Ching-Yuan Chang work, she was amazed by his ability to fire any kind of kiln on the first attempt. Bedwell first saw his work in 1990, after he was selected as the premier artist-in-residence at Baltimore Clayworks. Fifteen years later, Bedwell, of Towson, a founding director of the art facility, will have a dream realized when two of Clayworks' current artists-in-residence join Chang this summer in Taiwan. The events leading up to the exchange began when Bedwell helped initiate a residency fellowship.
NEWS
December 16, 2005
Louana M. Lackey, a ceramics historian and archaeologist, died of cancer Dec. 9 at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care. The Charles Village resident was 79. Born Louana Mae Engelhart in Champaign, Ill., she earned a Bachelor of Arts degree and a doctorate from American University in Washington. Dr. Lackey researched potters in Central America, Spain and Italy, and wrote about the work of contemporary ceramic artists. Her scholarly articles appeared in American Antiquity, American Ceramics, British Archaeological Reports, Ceramics Monthly and Journal of the National Council on Education for the Ceramic Arts.
BUSINESS
November 18, 2012
Just in time for the holiday is this decorative dark putty shard tree by MacKenzie-Childs, the furniture and ceramics company based in upstate New York known for its whimsical handcrafted designs. Sold at Neiman Marcus, Saks Fith Avenue, and other boutiques and retailers, fans of MacKenzie-Childs include Kourtney Kardashian and Goldie Hawn. This 20-inch-high tree is handmade by artisans who work with ceramic shards of items like teacups and flower pots to create a one-of-a-kind product.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 25, 2011
Kitsch can be cool, according to Nick Ramey. The 29-year-old ceramic artist from Aurora, Ind., is always looking for the perfect image or object to add to his artwork. His pieces are meant to be functional and sculptural - they can be used on a daily basis or simply sit as curious decorations on a shelf. Ramey is a resident artist and instructor at Baltimore Clayworks, where he teaches classes in wheel-thrown and altered pottery. On Sunday, Clayworks will be teaching a workshop as part of Free Fall Baltimore.
EXPLORE
July 28, 2011
Erica Kempler , of Columbia, has two ceramics pieces on juried exhibit at the First Street Gallery in New York City, and two other ceramics pieces on juried exhibit at the Bedford Gallery, in Walnut Creek, Calif. She is a 2005 graduate of Wilde Lake High School and a 2009 graduate of Frostburg State University. Kempler is currently a Masters of Find Arts student at Indiana University of Pennsylvania. Ethel Sturgis , of Columbia, celebrated her 95th birthday July 21, 2011.
NEWS
By Dennis Hockman, Chesapeake Home+Living | February 4, 2011
When it comes to doors, knobs, floors, molding and such for the home, discussions typically focus on the history of styles. But when it comes to tile, the conversation is about what's happening now. Aided by new technology, tile today is more eco-friendly and more widely available in a vast range of finishes and textures. As a hard, watertight surface applied to floors and walls, ceramic, stone and porcelain have been commonly used for thousands of years. In some ways, not much has changed.
NEWS
November 22, 2009
The Keramos Society of Anne Arundel Community College will hold its annual student ceramics and sculpture holiday sale from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. Nov. 30 in the Cade Center for Fine Arts, Room 219, 101 College Parkway in Arnold. There will be mugs, vases, cookware, plates, teapots and more for sale. For further information, call 410-777-2624.
NEWS
By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,rsca@ritastclair.com | October 25, 2008
The high ceilings in the loft to which we recently moved make our low-slung modern furniture seem badly out of scale. I've learned from magazines that this problem can be effectively addressed by painting the ceiling a dark color. OK, but how should I display my collection of ceramics? None of the items is especially large but each can be clearly seen from a few feet away. Without knowing the room's actual dimensions or - most importantly - its lighting array, the best I can offer are some general thoughts as well as a photo of a setting that may have similarities to your own. This image comes from The Nest Home Design Handbook, written by Carley Roney and published by Clarkson Potter.
NEWS
By LIZ ATWOOD | August 10, 2008
One World Emporium 825 Frederick Road, Catonsville 2 p.m.-7 p.m. Monday-Thursday; 1 p.m.-7 p.m. Friday; noon-5 p.m. Saturday; noon-3 p.m. Sunday 410-744-5575 Handmade arts and crafts from more than 20 countries are brought together in One World Emporium, a new shop in the Strawberry Fields complex in downtown Catonsville. The store, behind Catonsville Gourmet, has offerings including dolls from India, puppets from Chile, ceramics from Mexico, baskets from Uganda, vases from Vietnam and hand-carved chess sets from Pakistan.
BUSINESS
By Tim Carter and Tim Carter,Tribune Media Services | May 11, 2008
Can you instruct me on how to paint ceramic tile? Money is very tight now, and painting my ceramic tile is the only thing I can afford. Can you paint old ceramic tile, so it won't peel? Is there a special ceramic tile paint? What is an easy way to paint ceramic floor tile, and should I paint the grout? You can really transform the look and feel of a room by painting ceramic tile. If you have painted walls and even flooring before, you can do this job. Any ceramic tile can be painted, whether it's old or new. The most important thing is to make sure the tile is perfectly clean.
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