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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Los Angeles Times Syndicate | July 9, 1995
If you're the type of devoted amateur who collects images and information on interior design, have I got a book for you! It's called "Designing With Tile." The author is Carolyn Coyle, and it's published by Van Nostrand Reinhold.This is no oversized coffee table decoration. Instead, it's a practical guide to one of the most durable surface elements ever fabricated for use in interiors. Through illustrations and text, the author covers the selection, installation and maintenance of ceramic tile in the home while also listing sources for purchasing the material.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
A stone cottage in Baltimore's Homeland neighborhood sold recently for $500,000 in a short sale. The 85-year-old home, with its steeply pitched roof, gables and dormers, sits on a beautifully landscaped quarter of an acre. "The architecture is lovely, with its stone exterior and a screened-in porch in the back," said buyer's agent Ashley Richardson of Long & Foster Real Estate. "The rooms are a good size with high ceilings and easy furniture placement. The house needs some exterior paint, but [the buyers]
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By Tim Carter and Tim Carter,Tribune Media Services | May 11, 2008
Can you instruct me on how to paint ceramic tile? Money is very tight now, and painting my ceramic tile is the only thing I can afford. Can you paint old ceramic tile, so it won't peel? Is there a special ceramic tile paint? What is an easy way to paint ceramic floor tile, and should I paint the grout? You can really transform the look and feel of a room by painting ceramic tile. If you have painted walls and even flooring before, you can do this job. Any ceramic tile can be painted, whether it's old or new. The most important thing is to make sure the tile is perfectly clean.
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By Tim Carter and Tim Carter,Tribune Media Services | May 11, 2008
Can you instruct me on how to paint ceramic tile? Money is very tight now, and painting my ceramic tile is the only thing I can afford. Can you paint old ceramic tile, so it won't peel? Is there a special ceramic tile paint? What is an easy way to paint ceramic floor tile, and should I paint the grout? You can really transform the look and feel of a room by painting ceramic tile. If you have painted walls and even flooring before, you can do this job. Any ceramic tile can be painted, whether it's old or new. The most important thing is to make sure the tile is perfectly clean.
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By Rita St. Clair | December 20, 1992
Q: We've already decided to install all-white plumbing fixtures as part of the re-do of our master bath. But we're having trouble choosing material for the floor and walls. Please suggest something that's functional and cost-effective but which will also make a strong design statement.A: Sometimes it's the simplest materials that make the strongest statements. What counts most is the way in which a particular material is used.The selection you make also has to be easy to maintain in order to be functional and cost-effective.
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By Fred Rasmussen and Fred Rasmussen,SUN STAFF | September 24, 1997
Charles G. Mortale, a retired ceramic tile and terrazzo contractor who was known for his high-quality workmanship, died Friday at Gilchrist Center for Hospice Care in Towson of complications from diabetes and renal failure. He was 78.After World War II, the Timonium resident joined Pete Profili & Co. Inc., a Baltimore commercial marble, ceramic tile and terrazzo flooring contractor.Mr. Mortale retired as co-owner, vice president and treasurer in 1986.The company was founded in 1934 and sold in 1992.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | October 22, 1995
We have just signed a contract on a house nearing completion in a suburban subdivision. The kitchen is comfortably spacious, but we're not fond of its rather antiseptic appearance. The white lacquer-like finish on the cabinets seems particularly plain. How can we produce a warmer, more inviting atmosphere?You can always refinish the cabinets, but I don't think that's essential. Many of the other elements that you'll probably want to redo can actually be advantageously emphasized if their colors and textures are in contrast with white cabinets.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,LOS ANGELES TIMES SYNDICATE | April 7, 1996
We're planning a renovation of a weekend home with the aim of making its interior resemble the seaside environment outside it. We can't decide what kind of flooring to intstall in the large kitchen/family room adjacent to the terrace. Ceramic tile is one attractive possiblility -- except for its cost. Can you suggest another option?Perhaps your budget will allow you to install ceramic tile on the terrace, if not in the kitchen/family room. The flooring material inside could then be chosen to blend with what's used outside.
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By James Dulley and James Dulley,Contributing Writer | April 3, 1993
QUESTION: The sun shines in my kitchen in the morning and in the dining room in the afternoon. It feels great. How can I save some of this free heat for the evening in the winter without overheating in the summer?ANSWER: Installing solar tile on your floor or the lower part of the walls is effective, durable and attractive. It collects the sun's warmth during the day and slowly releases it in the evening. In the summer, the thermal mass of the tile and floor help reduce overheating.Traditionally, certain types and colors of ceramic tile have been used for this purpose.
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April 23, 1995
Real estate reference published in paperbackWhat do "acoustical custom spray," "chimney cap," "cupola," "fenestration," "U factor," "wainscoting" and "SAM mortgage" have in common? They are among the 800 words found in the "Illustrated Guide to Houses: Terms, Definitions and Drawings" published by Marshall & Swift.Intended as a handy reference for Realtors, insurance agents and homeowners, the 132-page paperback takes readers on a tour of a typical house from the viewpoint of builders and appraisers.
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By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,Sun reporter | February 10, 2008
Piled on two rolling carts: four panel doors, two cases of gray ceramic tile, two bags of grout, one white pedestal sink, still boxed, and a pail of mortar. The doors need some work. The tiles are in perfect shape: unused. The sink is in the original box. Grand total: $156, less than half the retail price. The castoffs of some homeowner or builder have become the treasures of another at the Loading Dock, a nonprofit Baltimore warehouse that sells reusable building goods and builder's seconds.
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By Tim Carter and Tim Carter,Tribune Media Services | September 30, 2007
I think a tile backsplash would be a great way to make my bathroom look better. Do you have to buy special backsplash tile? I'm open to any backsplash tile ideas, including a glass tile backsplash. If you were installing a ceramic tile backsplash, how would you do it, and what pitfalls would you avoid? Do I need any specific tools or skills to complete this job? Tile backsplashes in bathrooms or kitchens are a great idea. I like them for all sorts of reasons. First, they are almost entirely waterproof.
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By COX NEWS SERVICE | July 24, 2005
One of the home improvement industry's hottest growth markets these days is right underfoot. Flooring products have exploded into a dizzying array of textures, colors, sizes and price ranges, encompassing everything from do-it-yourself laminates to high-end Travertine tiles. Carpet makers, whose sales suffered amid the rise of laminates and ceramic tile, now offer glueless, modular carpet tiles that can be used to cover a small area or an entire room. "Flooring products have taken a quantum leap forward," said Al Stewart, editor of National Floor Trends magazine, which tracks the industry.
NEWS
February 25, 2004
Charles Bell Adams, 68, ceramic tile contractor Charles Bell Adams, a ceramic tile contractor and sports fan, died of a heart attack Saturday at Anne Arundel Medical Center. The Arnold resident was 68. Mr. Adams was born and raised in Halethorpe and attended Catonsville High School. He established V.A. Tile and worked for 43 years as a commercial and residential tile contractor before retiring in 1999. Mr. Adams was the 65th heart transplant recipient at Johns Hopkins Hospital, and lived for almost 18 years with his replacement heart, family members said.
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By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | April 2, 2000
WANDERING through any of today's huge home improvements centers, especially ones that are brand new, is like a trip to a Fantasyland just for do-it-yourselfers. The wonders you'll see. Gorgeous kitchen cabinets, set up so you can see how a kitchen might look. Aisles of ceramic tile, some of them with intricate, hand-painted designs. Acres of carpets and other floor finishings. Two dozen different shower heads. Rows upon rows of brightly shining light fixtures and ceiling fans ... the list goes on and on. Maybe it's the influence of Martha Stewart -- we wouldn't be a bit surprised -- or the fact that more foreign travel and a surge of recent immigration is making Americans more sophisticated in all their tastes, but it seems that cheap and tacky are out, and stylish and relatively inexpensive are in. Karol spent a couple of hours recently in one of these giant emporiums, which had been open only a week.
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By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | December 12, 1999
SOME YEARS ago, friends of Karol's renovated their kitchen in Bolton Hill. It had brown cabinets, brown floor, dark brick walls and a terrible layout. The designer, Trish Houck of Kitchen Concepts, reversed the positions of a door and a window, turned a bath/laundry room into pantry/storage space, and installed a huge island in the middle of the room.It was an amazing transformation, in no small part because where every previous surface and appliance had been cheap, old-fashioned and ugly, the new surfaces and appliances were sleek, beautiful and state of the art.But it was the surface of the island that was the centerpiece of the room -- a gleaming slab of dark granite shot through with red and gold, with a sort of star-burst design in the middle.
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By Rita St. Clair and Rita St. Clair,Contributing Writer/ Los Angeles Times Syndicate | January 24, 1993
Q: I plan to create an informal eating area by removing the wall between my kitchen and a small dining room that's seldom used. What's delaying the project is indecision about the type of flooring to be used for the combined space. The ceramic tile in the kitchen is no longer commercially available.A: I hope you're not thinking about tearing out the tile. That's sure to be an arduous job and probably an unnecessary one as well.Assuming that the dining area has a wooden floor, you have a choice of several surfacing materials that can be integrated with the existing ceramic tile in the kitchen.
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By Marie Marciano Gullard, For The Baltimore Sun | October 25, 2013
A stone cottage in Baltimore's Homeland neighborhood sold recently for $500,000 in a short sale. The 85-year-old home, with its steeply pitched roof, gables and dormers, sits on a beautifully landscaped quarter of an acre. "The architecture is lovely, with its stone exterior and a screened-in porch in the back," said buyer's agent Ashley Richardson of Long & Foster Real Estate. "The rooms are a good size with high ceilings and easy furniture placement. The house needs some exterior paint, but [the buyers]
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By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | September 26, 1999
RON IS occasionally driven quietly crazy by clients who can't quite make up their minds about details. It seems that sometimes as the work goes on, and the details get smaller, some version of Murphy's law kicks in and the decisions get harder.In fact, this is the point where everything can get a little crazy. And he's finding out firsthand, now that his and his wife's master suite addition is in the final stages, yes, indeed, selecting finishes can be a lot harder than you might think.They had decided on some of the larger finishing details, such as plumbing fixtures and floor finishes.
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By Caitlin Francke and Caitlin Francke,SUN STAFF | June 30, 1999
I have barely slept in months. I rarely change clothes. My legs are scarred. My arms are bruised. I have destroyed five manicures. Worst of all, I have made a discovery: The 1950s generation, people I scorned as visionless, were actually right on target. Ordering a brand-new suburban cookie-cutter house from the Sears catalog sounds like a great idea. It's a mystery to me why we massage-loving, goat cheese-eating, cell-phoned yuppies of the 1990s feel the drive to buy and renovate houses.
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