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By Robert G. Beckel | April 27, 2000
WHEN TEXAS GOV. George W. Bush made his now infamous appearance at the altar of the religious right, Bob Jones University, we skeptics assumed Mr. Bush's mission was to solidify his support among Christian conservatives in the pivotal South Carolina primary, and, in the process, remind the faithful of his Christian rebirth two decades ago. But I'm here to testify, brothers and sisters: What the Bob Jones event did instead was to turn little George into...
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By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | October 20, 2013
Just hours before the House of Representatives passed the bipartisan plan to reopen the government last week, Republicans emerged from a final meeting on the matter with grim faces and tight lips. Except for Rep. Andy Harris. While many of his colleagues - damaged politically by the budget impasse - were hesitant to share their positions, Maryland's only Republican in Congress knew he wouldn't be supporting the legislation his own party leadership was recommending. And he wasn't afraid to say so. "Yeah, I'm not voting for the bill," Harris, 56, said in the basement of the Capitol as fellow Republicans offered noncommittal responses to reporters.
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NEWS
By Melissa Harris | April 13, 2007
Longtime Democratic strategist Elaine Kamarck started her government career as a Woodlawn middle-schooler, listening to her father read his Medicare training manuals to her. "If I could figure them out, he knew he was writing clearly enough," she said of her father, a career civil servant at the Social Security Administration. Almost 30 years later, Kamarck arrived at the White House to help Vice President Al Gore "reinvent government," injecting corporate management practices to the tune of 350,000 fewer federal jobs.
NEWS
By Jules Witcover | May 25, 2012
That pop you may or may not have heard the other day was the bursting pipedream of a centrist presidential candidate outside the establishment parties. The organizers of a group calling itself Americans Elect decided to close shop after failing to find anyone who would qualify to be its standard-bearer in November. No one who met the group's eligibility requirements to become its presidential nominee was able to corral the threshold 10,000 endorsements needed from "delegates" in an online nationwide convention.
NEWS
By Scott Shane and Scott Shane,Moscow Bureau of The Sun | February 3, 1991
MOSCOW -- Vladimir A. Kryuchkov, chief of the Soviet KGB, is a busy man. But he found time last week to meet with the leaders of the Centrist Bloc of Political Parties and Movements, one of the most dubious of the dozens of political groups to spring up in this country over the last two years."
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 27, 1992
MOSCOW -- Russian President Boris N. Yeltsin's government declared its intent yesterday to forge ahead with painful pro-market reforms, defying pressure from a centrist bloc to compromise its programs in return for political support."
NEWS
December 10, 1996
FACED WITH A CHOICE between ideological, right-wing leaders and conventional, middle-road Republicans, GOP officials in Maryland have wisely picked proven centrists to re-shape the party's Senate caucus.First, Republican senators unanimously elevated Sen. F. Vernon Boozer of Baltimore County to the post of minority leader, replacing the late Sen. John A. Cade. Then Anne Arundel County's Republican Central Committee overwhelmingly chose former county executive Robert R. Neall for Mr. Cade's vacant Senate seat.
NEWS
By Ann LoLordo and Ann LoLordo,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | January 25, 1999
JERUSALEM -- Ousted Israeli Defense Minister Yitzhak Mordechai, at his last Cabinet meeting, invoked powerful biblical images yesterday to upbraid Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu and elucidate the reasons to unseat him in the spring elections.Mordechai, a political moderate who was fired Saturday as he prepared to abandon Netanyahu's hard-line government for a new centrist movement, chose his verses carefully. The former Army general's aim was clear: to pointedly distinguish himself from the hawkish, Likud prime minister who appointed him to his first political post.
NEWS
January 31, 2001
TONY BLAIR'S ambition is to be the first British Labor Party prime minister to have two successive full terms, surpassing the efforts of Harold Wilson in the 1960s and 1970s to make it a normally ruling party. To that end, Mr. Blair shook off the heritage of socialism and made Labor centrist, too much so for many of its loyalists. His party rival is Gordon Brown, chancellor of the exchequer. His stalwart loyalist is Alastair Campbell, press secretary. His key adviser, the "dark prince" of centrism, has been Peter Mandelson, trendy grandson of an illustrious Labor politician.
NEWS
By Janet Hook and Janet Hook,LOS ANGELES TIMES | December 16, 2003
WASHINGTON - Sen. John B. Breaux of Louisiana, a rare centrist Democrat in an increasingly polarized Congress, announced yesterday that he would not seek re-election next year. That makes Breaux the fifth Southern Democrat to step down in 2004 rather than run again in a region that has been increasingly inhospitable to his party. Breaux would have been a shoo-in for re-election, and his decision to forgo a fourth term complicates Democrats' efforts to capture control of the Senate. Republicans now hold a 51-48 majority, with one Democrat-leaning independent.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 12, 2012
Centrist Democrats in the House of Delegates have decided to form a group to promote their point of view within the party and weigh in on key issues, a leading member of the group said Thursday. Del. Mary Dulany-James, a Harford County Democrat, said the groups would probably be called the Blue Dog delegation or caucus -- named after a similarly oriented group of moderate Democrats in Congress. James said the group could have apotential membership of about 20 members of the Democratic caucus, which has tended to be dominated by more liberal members from Baltimore city and Prinnce George's and Montgomery counties.
NEWS
By Richard Wolffe | January 2, 2011
For someone who is supposedly cool and detached, President Barack Obama has triggered outraged and outsized reactions on both sides of the political spectrum in the last year. Conservatives loathe his health care reforms; progressives hate his tax compromises. It is true that the two signature laws have some things in common. Both were negotiated mostly through backroom talks, which alienated those left out and confused the president's supporters. Both deals carry price tags that are hard for the average voter to fathom.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | August 23, 2009
SALISBURY --Barely halfway through his first year in office, Rep. Frank Kratovil of Maryland is caught in the middle of the biggest legislative fight in recent memory: the national brawl over health care. On one side are his party's leaders in Congress and President Barack Obama, whose supporters helped Kratovil become the first Eastern Shore Democrat elected to the House in 20 years. On the other side are many, if not most, constituents in his conservative district, where opposition to overhauling the health care system is widespread and many aren't shy about predicting that he'll be a one-term lawmaker.
NEWS
July 13, 2009
Even before Judge Sonia Sotomayor was nominated for the Supreme Court, the rallying cry went out from the predictable social conservatives that Senate Republicans needed to sharply attack President Barack Obama's nominee, if only to prove their fealty to their politically influential evangelical allies. Today, as the Senate Judiciary Committee begins confirmation hearings, those who are looking to draw blood are bound to be disappointed: Two months of analysis and research have led to the inescapable conclusion that the 55-year-old appeals court judge is not only knowledgeable and qualified for the post but that her rulings are well within the mainstream of the federal judiciary.
NEWS
By Janet Hook and Janet Hook,Tribune Washington Bureau | February 6, 2009
WASHINGTON -Senate leaders called off plans to vote on President Barack Obama's economic recovery plan late last night in hopes that a group of centrist lawmakers from both parties would be able to fashion a compromise that would cut the cost of the $937 billion bill and win support from at least a few Republicans. After a long day of behind-the-scenes negotiations, Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid, a Nevada Democrat, dropped plans to hold a final vote on the bill. The bipartisan group worked into the night to trim up to $100 billion, an attempt to bring moderate Republicans on board without driving Democrats away.
NEWS
By Paul West and Paul West,paul.west@baltsun.com | December 6, 2008
WASHINGTON - Last year, with some fanfare, former Maryland Lt. Gov. Michael S. Steele joined two prominent Republican moderates in announcing the revival of a centrist political organization, the Republican Leadership Council. Now, Steele's name has mysteriously disappeared from the RLC's Web site. Until recently, he was prominently listed as one of three co-founders, along with former New Jersey Gov. Christine Todd Whitman and former Missouri Sen. John Danforth. The change apparently happened within the past week, according to an Internet search.
NEWS
By DAN BERGER | November 10, 1994
Who needs a governor anyway?The people have spoken. There will be no federal health insurance in the next two years.Bill was nominated as a centrist, elected as a liberal, served two years as a liberal, and now he's a centrist again.The state of California needs all the illegal aliens it can find to work on the prisons it is committed to build.
NEWS
By Ronald Brownstein | May 25, 1999
WHEN Bill Clinton took office as president, congressional Democrats resisted Mr. Clinton's efforts to steer them in the centrist direction he promised in his 1992 campaign. Mr. Clinton was too deferential, and he compounded his problems by his own miscalculations on issues such as health care. The resulting chaos undermined the president's first two years -- and precipitated the GOP landslide of 1994.California Gov. Gray Davis is too polite -- or politic -- to say he's worried that his Democratic allies could drag him into the same ditch.
NEWS
By CLARENCE PAGE | July 31, 2007
The greatest triumph that conservatives ever achieved is to make liberals embarrassed to call themselves "liberal." That thought came to mind as I watched Sen. Hillary Rodham Clinton rhetorically wriggle her way, as so many liberals do, right out of using the "L-word" to describe herself. During the CNN/YouTube debate by Democratic presidential candidates, the New York Democrat was asked, "How would you define the word `liberal' and would you use this word to describe yourself?" Briefly, she showed off her knowledge of the word's various meanings over the past, oh, century or two. She pointed out how the word used to mean that "you were for the freedom to achieve, that you were willing to stand against big power and on behalf of the individual."
NEWS
By Sebastian Rotella and Sebastian Rotella,LOS ANGELES TIMES | April 26, 2007
PARIS -- France's heated presidential race became a battle for the political center yesterday when Francois Bayrou, whose strong finish in Sunday's first-round vote made him a potential kingmaker, refused to endorse a candidate in the runoff. At a packed news conference, Bayrou declined to formally ally himself with either Nicolas Sarkozy, the candidate of the rightist Union for a Popular Movement, or Segolene Royal of the Socialist Party. However, Bayrou sent signals that he prefers Royal.
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