Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCentre Court
IN THE NEWS

Centre Court

FIND MORE STORIES ABOUT:
FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | June 28, 1991
WIMBLEDON, England -- They held a tennis tournament yesterday and a fashion show broke out.At precisely 3:52 p.m., a clean-shaven 21-year-old model/player with shoulder-length streaked blond hair, a white headband and dangling gold earring peeled off a white warm-up suit and walked down a grass-covered runway. The crowd of 13,107 in the old green stadium fell silent and then cheered.Andre Agassi was back at Wimbledon, all dressed up in virgin white.Agassi, bowing to tradition, therules and the royals at the All England Club, essentially bleached his basic multi-colored "Rock-and-Roll Tennis" outfit and conformed to the tournament's "predominantly white" clothing rule.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
By Diane Pucin, Tribune newspapers | July 1, 2010
WIMBLEDON, England — Roger Federer cocked an eyebrow once during the fourth set of his Wimbledon quarterfinal match against rosy-cheeked Tomas Berdych. Berdych, a talented 24-year-old from the Czech Republic, had just hit a looping forehand that was deceptively powerful. The ball landed deep in the corner of Centre Court, just a smidgen past the tip of Federer's racket. The point gave the Czech player a service break in the fourth set and it proclaimed what was about to happen: Federer will not be Wimbledon champion and won't even be a semifinalist.
Advertisement
SPORTS
By Don Markus and Don Markus,Staff Writer | June 25, 1992
WIMBLEDON, England -- The last time Pam Shriver played singles on Centre Court at the All England Club, she was ranked fifth in the world. She might as well have been 500th, the way she played that day against Steffi Graf in the 1988 semifinals of Wimbledon."
NEWS
By Diane Pucin, Tribune newspapers | June 28, 2010
WIMBLEDON, England — This would be enough for any fan with a ticket to Wimbledon on Monday. Serena Williams, the defending champion, is playing Maria Sharapova, a longingly eager ex-champion who at 23 desperately wants to be at the top again with her surgically repaired shoulder a mental hindrance but her fighting spirit still potent. And Kim Clijsters is playing against Justine Henin. The two Belgians have combined for nine major championships, both took big chunks of time off and have been — at most — cordial and at times standoffish with each other.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | July 1, 1997
WIMBLEDON, England -- For the most famous piece of real estate in tennis, Centre Court at Wimbledon is looking pretty lousy right now.A large area of grass in front of the baseline has been carved up, and the court is littered with bare spots. And the court must still absorb plenty of punishment leading to Sunday's men's final.Three-time champion Pete Sampras said yesterday that some patches of the court were "like cement," and he added he had "never seen Centre Court so chopped up."Jana Novotna, a former women's finalist, said: "There is a path [where]
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 25, 1997
WIMBLEDON, England -- They sure don't mind rushing along the new teen-agers at Wimbledon.Yesterday, 16-year-old Anna Kournikova of Russia, unseeded but hardly unknown, made her Wimbledon debut in a little out of the way spot known as Centre Court.She beat Chanda Rubin, 6-1, 6-1, and then faced the ravenous British tabloid reporters.The reporters tried to lure her into all sorts of controversies.Did she talk trash about the play of another top teen, Venus Williams?"I never say anything about players," she said.
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin and Diane Pucin,LOS ANGELES TIMES | June 26, 2004
WIMBLEDON, England -- Goran Ivanisevic will be missed. His flamboyant game will be missed, including the way he busted 130-mph serves from a loose, skinny body. His loud mouth will be missed, the way he carried on colorful and sometimes profane conversations in English and Croatian with himself, the fans, the umpires, his opponents -- even with the tennis balls and rackets and a blade of grass yesterday on Centre Court at Wimbledon. "Help me," he said after a forehand by Lleyton Hewitt had sent Ivanisevic splayed face down.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | June 22, 1998
WIMBLEDON, England -- Now, Steffi Graf is an underdog. Now that she's 29 and returning from injury, she'll own the crowds just as she once owned the tournament.Her every move will be watched. Her every victory will be savored, because no one is quite sure if this is her comeback or her last stand.Today, Graf is back where she belongs, on Centre Court at Wimbledon.She will meet Spain's Gala Leon Garcia in a first-round match on what could be a day for star turns.Reigning men's champion Pete Sampras, 1992 winner Andre Agassi and Monica Seles are among those due to play today, if England's notorious summer weather produces clear skies instead of rainstorms.
SPORTS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 1, 1991
WIMBLEDON, England -- If Jimmy Connors never comes back to Wimbledon, at least he will have this day.He gave this place so many good years, so many finals, but, for once, Wimbledon gave him something back. On Sunday, bloody middle Sunday, Connors and the masses had the run of the joint. He was the street kid again, playing to the tennis barbarians on Centre Court, and not to the usual snooty cast of royals who shake their jewelry and take their tea.This was between Connors and Wimbledon.So what if he lost yesterday to Derrick Rostagno, 7-6 (7-2)
NEWS
June 22, 1994
Upset at Centre Court
SPORTS
By Diane Pucin, Tribune Newspapers | June 27, 2010
This would be enough for any tennis fan with a ticket to Wimbledon on Monday. Serena Williams, the defending champion, is playing Maria Sharapova, a longingly eager ex-champion who at 23 desperately wants to be at the top again with her surgically repaired shoulder a mental hindrance but her fighting spirit still potent. Kim Clijsters is playing against Justine Henin, two Belgians who have combined for nine major championships, who both took big chunks of time off from tennis, who have been at most cordial and at times standoffish with each other.
NEWS
By Diane Pucin, Tribune newspapers | June 25, 2010
WIMBLEDON, England — The final shot came off the racket of John Isner on Thursday, a backhand hit with a single purpose late in the afternoon on Court 18 of the All England Club. It was meant to be a winner. It was not hit daintily or with caution, even though Isner was playing the 491st minute of a final set in a first-round Wimbledon match that had carried on through three days. It found its spot, out of the reach of gallant Frenchman Nicolas Mahut, who lunged for the ball knowing it was out of his reach.
NEWS
By Tribune Newspapers | June 22, 2010
WIMBLEDON, England — There's a curfew at Wimbledon. It's 11 p.m. and third-seeded Novak Djokovic beat it by a minute in defeating little Olivier Rochus 4-6, 6-2, 3-6, 6-4, 6-2 to end an eventful first day at Wimbledon. Djokovic finished his three-hour, 51-minute match with the roof over Centre Court. And it didn't even rain Monday. But the tennis on the most famous court in the world took a while because top-seeded Roger Federer dawdled through five sets before beating back the unexpected challenge of Alejandro Falla 5-7, 4-6, 6-4, 7-6 (1)
TRAVEL
By Stevenson Swanson and Stevenson Swanson,Chicago Tribune | June 10, 2007
WIMBLEDON, ENGLAND / / It was raining when we arrived at Wimbledon. Of course. England had been sweltering under a heat wave for a week, but as my wife, Ann, and I set out in the morning for our long-awaited visit to tennis' hallowed lawns, the clouds rolled in, the temperature dropped, and the rain began to fall. The main reason for our trip to England, five months in the planning and years in the dreaming, seemed to be in danger of turning into a damp disappointment. You don't have to cross an ocean to see top-level tennis: The U.S. Open, one of the four major tournaments of the tennis world, begins Aug. 27 in New York.
SPORTS
By DIANE PUCIN and DIANE PUCIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 8, 2006
WIMBLEDON, England -- Marcos Baghdatis hit a winner from his knees. He coaxed the crowd to its feet with a booming backhand and a pleading gesture for support. He hit a dozen drop shots that touched the grass and spun at crazy angles. But then Rafael Nadal returned half of them for winners. And when the 2-hour, 26-minute Wimbledon men's semifinal match was over yesterday, Baghdatis could only put his arms around the sweaty shoulders of Nadal and say, "Good job." For while Baghdatis' shot-making was often flamboyant and sometimes spectacular, Nadal was better.
SPORTS
By DIANE PUCIN and DIANE PUCIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 7, 2006
WIMBLEDON, England -- Four men left, all so different. There is Jonas Bjorkman, unseeded Swede, the 34-year-old sweet father who nearly gave up singles last year, trying to beat the unbeatable Roger Federer. There is Marcos Baghdatis, the emotional Cypriot mugging for the crowd and dusting off his flashy forehand and between-the-legs magic. He'll play Rafael Nadal, the clay-trained Spaniard who is still learning to move on grass and dealing with unsubstantiated mumblings that he may be linked to a Madrid doping scandal.
NEWS
By Bill Glauber and Bill Glauber,Sun Staff Correspondent | July 1, 1991
WIMBLEDON, England -- And on the seventh day, the wave came to Wimbledon.The tennis commoners who politely stormed the wrought-iron gates of the All England Club yesterday transformed Centre Court into the People's Court. They dragged in duffel bags and sleeping bags, brown-bag lunches and six-packs of sodas. They occupied the seats of the rich and the famous, the titled and the privileged.It was first-come, first-served at Wimbledon, where tennis was being played for the first time on the two-week tournament's middle Sunday, which had always been a day of rest.
NEWS
By LISA GOLDBERG and LISA GOLDBERG,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | May 5, 2006
A Baltimore developer is sprucing up several of the stores that front Reisterstown Road in downtown Pikesville as part of a $5 million project that will also include the first Maryland location for a Florida-based restaurant chain. The Courtyard @ Centre Court project, by Vanguard Equities, is the latest for an area that county officials say has attracted more than $57 million in private investment in the past five years - improvements that they and an area business representative said are helping to revitalize the aging community south of Interstate 695. For a long time, "people didn't go to urban areas," said Sherrie Becker, the executive director of the Pikesville Chamber of Commerce.
SPORTS
By DIANE PUCIN and DIANE PUCIN,LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 6, 2006
WIMBLEDON, England -- Hah. For a moment, just one, after Mario Ancic had played a heated point of harder and harder-hit forehands, he hit one too good. It flew past Roger Federer, who barely dents the grass on Wimbledon's Centre Court as he runs on his toes. Ancic had broken Federer's serve. And then held his own at love, four straight points that caused Ancic to pump his fist and shout. Hah, Federer thought to himself. Does this young man from Croatia think he can beat me? So here's what Federer did. He held his own serve at love.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.