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NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 4, 2002
HOUSTON - While a drought continues to parch the West, a powerful summer storm stalled over Central Texas this week, flooding highways, creeks and dams with as much as 16 inches of pounding rain. At least three people were reported dead and one was missing as a result of the deluge, which began Saturday and is expected to linger through today. "We're not expecting a lot more rain, but the rivers are still at dangerously high levels," said Nezette Rydell, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in the Central Texas town of New Braunfels.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore sun | August 13, 2013
Miri Marshall, a weathercaster at KCEN-TV in central Texas, will join WBAL-TV Aug. 22, as part of the station's weather team, general manager Dan Joerres said Tuesday. Marshall fills a role that became vacant when meterologist John Collins retired as a full-time staffer at the end of May, after 24 years at the station. Collins still has a freelance relationship with WBAL-TV, according to Joerres. "Miri has a lot of personality, a lot of energy on-air," Joerres said Tuesday.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By David Zurawik and The Baltimore sun | August 13, 2013
Miri Marshall, a weathercaster at KCEN-TV in central Texas, will join WBAL-TV Aug. 22, as part of the station's weather team, general manager Dan Joerres said Tuesday. Marshall fills a role that became vacant when meterologist John Collins retired as a full-time staffer at the end of May, after 24 years at the station. Collins still has a freelance relationship with WBAL-TV, according to Joerres. "Miri has a lot of personality, a lot of energy on-air," Joerres said Tuesday.
NEWS
By James Kimberly and James Kimberly,HOUSTON CHRONICLE | December 25, 2002
BRADY, Texas -- This is where Christmas kisses are born, in a stable of all places, and a bespectacled rancher named Robert "Speedy" Tiemann is responsible. Tiemann runs his family's businesses, and for 49 years one of those has been the business of selling fresh mistletoe to people unable or unwilling to pluck it from trees themselves. The mistletoe business is good for the Tiemann family. Tiemann, 59, won't say how good, but he is acknowledged by just about everyone who knows as the primary provider of fresh mistletoe in the United States.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington from the archives of the Ann Arrundall County Historical Society | December 1, 1996
50 years agoNotre Dame's football team, with grater manpower and far more football experience but without any brilliance along any line, beat a young, inexperienced Navy team yesterday by a 28-0 score. -- The Sun, Nov. 2, 1946.Fire yesterday damaged the four-story building of the Annapolis Grammar School. Fire Commissioner Thomas Basil said investigation disclosed "evidence of the fire's having been set." -- The Sun, Nov. 11, 1946.Gov.-elect William Preston Lane, Jr., formally requested Governor O'Conor yesterday to direct the State Roads Commission to complete plans for the construction of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1996
AUSTIN, Texas - On this blustery day in March, most of Central Texas is under a tornado watch, with formidable dark clouds poised to sweep down on the city. But in Molly Ivins' limestone house on the south side, an irony watch is in effect. Eyebrows arch. Tones shift subtly, creating aural quotation marks around seemingly innocuous comments."Stop and Smell the Roses," "Nothin' But Good Times Ahead"Then the Wall Street Journal asked [then-Vice President Bush] what went through his mind when his plane was shot down in World War II. "Well," replied Bush, "you go back to your fundamental values.
NEWS
By LAURA LIPPMAN | March 7, 1993
When I interviewed for a job at the Waco Tribune-Herald i 1981, each editor told me two things about the town that would be my home for the next 27 months:"It's a good place to raise children."And, "You know, they call this the buckle on the Bible Belt."Well, you reap what you sow. (Actually, "Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap," Galatians 6:7.) In a region that takes pride in being the Biblical buckle, the God-fearing populace often has its faith put to severe tests.That's not to suggest that Wacoans deserve this fate, only that their religious orientation helps them to survive it. You see, David Koresh and the Branch Davidians are simply the latest saga in a place that has had more than its share of strange sights and grim happenings.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | May 18, 1998
SAN MARCOS, Texas -- Recently, some 600 government, business and civic leaders from the explosively growing 22-county Austin-San Antonio corridor swarmed into this little college town for a futures conference.No single mayor or county official was in charge. The debate on fast-mounting transportation, water and air quality problems was officially unofficial.But this many people meeting to focus on a corridor linking two major metro regions is new here. Maybe we Americans are starting to emulate citistate alliances already making headway in Europe.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 6, 1990
WACO, Texas -- President Bush returned to his transplanted roots in the heart of Texas' flag-waving politics yesterday, issuing a sharply worded appeal for the state Republican ticket and telling voters: "Don't tell me what's wrong about this country. Show us what's right about it.""Tomorrow's vote is critical," Mr. Bush said, in a last-minute effort to use his presidential persuasion to draw Republican voters to the polls today. "You have a chance to make a difference."For President Bush, who was born in Massachusetts but whose political life began after he moved to Texas in 1948, the final day of the 1990 congressional campaign provided an opportunity to return to the tough talk of his successful 1988 presidential campaign -- laced with a strong dose of anti-Washington appeal.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | June 23, 1991
Cambridge, Mass. -- Dr. T. Berry Brazelton is from Texas -- central Texas -- and sounds it. But he lives hard by Harvard Yard, on a street with a fine New England name -- Hawthorne St. -- in a clapboard house painted a mustardy yellow popular in New England.He is from a region fond of gregariousness, but is married to a Lowell. She remembers walking, when a young girl, with her father, a Boston Brahmin, who did not acknowledge a cousin when they passed. When she asked why, her father explained: "He knows that I know him."
NEWS
By LOS ANGELES TIMES | July 4, 2002
HOUSTON - While a drought continues to parch the West, a powerful summer storm stalled over Central Texas this week, flooding highways, creeks and dams with as much as 16 inches of pounding rain. At least three people were reported dead and one was missing as a result of the deluge, which began Saturday and is expected to linger through today. "We're not expecting a lot more rain, but the rivers are still at dangerously high levels," said Nezette Rydell, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service in the Central Texas town of New Braunfels.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 18, 2001
WACO, Texas - Central Texas is a place that prides itself on patriotism, a place where many people drive pickup trucks and a place that is proud to call President Bush a neighbor. All that was apparent yesterday in an extraordinary scene on Texas Highway 6. Almost 20 vehicles - plenty of pickups, the occasional RV and an old Cadillac - formed a caravan and took a half-hour journey from a strip mall in Waco to Crawford, near Bush's ranch. The vehicles were plastered with American flags.
NEWS
By Neal R. Peirce | May 18, 1998
SAN MARCOS, Texas -- Recently, some 600 government, business and civic leaders from the explosively growing 22-county Austin-San Antonio corridor swarmed into this little college town for a futures conference.No single mayor or county official was in charge. The debate on fast-mounting transportation, water and air quality problems was officially unofficial.But this many people meeting to focus on a corridor linking two major metro regions is new here. Maybe we Americans are starting to emulate citistate alliances already making headway in Europe.
NEWS
By Robert M. Pennington from the archives of the Ann Arrundall County Historical Society | December 1, 1996
50 years agoNotre Dame's football team, with grater manpower and far more football experience but without any brilliance along any line, beat a young, inexperienced Navy team yesterday by a 28-0 score. -- The Sun, Nov. 2, 1946.Fire yesterday damaged the four-story building of the Annapolis Grammar School. Fire Commissioner Thomas Basil said investigation disclosed "evidence of the fire's having been set." -- The Sun, Nov. 11, 1946.Gov.-elect William Preston Lane, Jr., formally requested Governor O'Conor yesterday to direct the State Roads Commission to complete plans for the construction of the Chesapeake Bay Bridge.
FEATURES
By Laura Lippman and Laura Lippman,SUN STAFF | March 13, 1996
AUSTIN, Texas - On this blustery day in March, most of Central Texas is under a tornado watch, with formidable dark clouds poised to sweep down on the city. But in Molly Ivins' limestone house on the south side, an irony watch is in effect. Eyebrows arch. Tones shift subtly, creating aural quotation marks around seemingly innocuous comments."Stop and Smell the Roses," "Nothin' But Good Times Ahead"Then the Wall Street Journal asked [then-Vice President Bush] what went through his mind when his plane was shot down in World War II. "Well," replied Bush, "you go back to your fundamental values.
NEWS
By LAURA LIPPMAN | March 7, 1993
When I interviewed for a job at the Waco Tribune-Herald i 1981, each editor told me two things about the town that would be my home for the next 27 months:"It's a good place to raise children."And, "You know, they call this the buckle on the Bible Belt."Well, you reap what you sow. (Actually, "Whatsoever a man soweth, that shall he also reap," Galatians 6:7.) In a region that takes pride in being the Biblical buckle, the God-fearing populace often has its faith put to severe tests.That's not to suggest that Wacoans deserve this fate, only that their religious orientation helps them to survive it. You see, David Koresh and the Branch Davidians are simply the latest saga in a place that has had more than its share of strange sights and grim happenings.
SPORTS
By Ray Sasser and Ray Sasser,Dallas Morning News | April 28, 1991
CAMP VERDE, Texas -- The big rattlesnake's wake resembled the trail of a sinuous motorboat cutting through the clear water of the Cypress Springs Ranch lake in Kerr County about 100 miles west of Austin, Texas.Occasionally, the sinister reptile would lift its head a foot or so out of the water, apparently to take bearings on the distant bank, about 300 yards away. Why did the rattler cross the lake? That's a mystery. Why didn't the snake simply crawl around the adjacent dam? That's an even bigger mystery.
NEWS
By David L. Greene and David L. Greene,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 18, 2001
WACO, Texas - Central Texas is a place that prides itself on patriotism, a place where many people drive pickup trucks and a place that is proud to call President Bush a neighbor. All that was apparent yesterday in an extraordinary scene on Texas Highway 6. Almost 20 vehicles - plenty of pickups, the occasional RV and an old Cadillac - formed a caravan and took a half-hour journey from a strip mall in Waco to Crawford, near Bush's ranch. The vehicles were plastered with American flags.
NEWS
By GEORGE F. WILL | June 23, 1991
Cambridge, Mass. -- Dr. T. Berry Brazelton is from Texas -- central Texas -- and sounds it. But he lives hard by Harvard Yard, on a street with a fine New England name -- Hawthorne St. -- in a clapboard house painted a mustardy yellow popular in New England.He is from a region fond of gregariousness, but is married to a Lowell. She remembers walking, when a young girl, with her father, a Boston Brahmin, who did not acknowledge a cousin when they passed. When she asked why, her father explained: "He knows that I know him."
SPORTS
By Ray Sasser and Ray Sasser,Dallas Morning News | April 28, 1991
CAMP VERDE, Texas -- The big rattlesnake's wake resembled the trail of a sinuous motorboat cutting through the clear water of the Cypress Springs Ranch lake in Kerr County about 100 miles west of Austin, Texas.Occasionally, the sinister reptile would lift its head a foot or so out of the water, apparently to take bearings on the distant bank, about 300 yards away. Why did the rattler cross the lake? That's a mystery. Why didn't the snake simply crawl around the adjacent dam? That's an even bigger mystery.
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