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Central Station

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ENTERTAINMENT
By Mike Giuliano | September 27, 1991
Central Station, now open at the Mount Vernon site formerly occupied by the interesting Oriental-French restaurant JaFe and then briefly by Flamingo's, aims to be a restaurant and something more. It has a saloon, restaurant, piano bar and game room spread over its compact two floors, in effect offering a pTC different level of entertainment every time you climb stairs.Nightlifers will mostly gravitate to the first floor saloon, which was packed with a see-and-be-seen crowd on a recent visit.
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FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | February 20, 2007
With a few button taps on his cellular flip phone and a vague, catchy message, bartender Sean O'Donnell can almost guarantee that he can double his business on a given night. O'Donnell has been using text messages for the past year to attract patrons to his bar in Mount Vernon, Grand Central Station. "I try to make them witty or funny," O'Donnell said. "That way if they can't come, they can still get a laugh out of it." Bartenders are using text messages to attract their regulars and tell them where they are working that night.
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FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 12, 1999
We've seen it before: Bizarre circumstances bring two mismatched people together; they embark on a road trip, encounter an assortment of colorful characters and wind up bonded forever.If you thought this formula had outworn any possibility of invention, see "Central Station," Walter Salles' extraordinary movie that brings deep emotions to the surface even when it maintains a deceptive simplicity.Carried by a performance of monumental proportions by the Brazilian actress Fernanda Montenegro (who was nominated this week for a best actress Oscar)
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | August 11, 2005
Manicure and Martini Night Where: Central Station, 1001/1003 N. Charles St. When: 7 p.m. Wednesday Why: Look and feel fantastic with a $5 general manicure and a few $5 medium-shelf martinis at this gay/lesbian bar in Mount Vernon. Might want to get there a little early so your name's at the top of the sign-up sheet. Information: 410-752-7133, www.centralstationpub.com. Admission: No cover.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1997
When Hilton Braithwaite began working in restaurants in his native Cambridge, Mass., while still in high school, he knew he was making money. "But I didn't know what I was acquiring was a trade," he said. "That I could always find work."These days, after a stint as a photography teacher at Howard University, he is back to being a chef, at Mount Vernon's Central Station restaurant.Photography and cooking have always been the two driving factors in Braithwaite's life. He finds both challenging and rewarding, and cooking is always there if art leads to lean times.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Sam Sessa | August 11, 2005
Manicure and Martini Night Where: Central Station, 1001/1003 N. Charles St. When: 7 p.m. Wednesday Why: Look and feel fantastic with a $5 general manicure and a few $5 medium-shelf martinis at this gay/lesbian bar in Mount Vernon. Might want to get there a little early so your name's at the top of the sign-up sheet. Information: 410-752-7133, www.centralstationpub.com. Admission: No cover.
NEWS
July 1, 2000
Vernon T. Liphart, 45, co-manager of 2 city bars Vernon Thomas Liphart, co-manager of Central Station, a Mount Vernon bar, died Tuesday of cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 45 and lived in Bolton Hill. In 1986, he assisted in the opening of the Allegro nightclub at 1101 Cathedral St., also in Mount Vernon. With Donald Davis, his life partner of 26 years, he opened a second nightspot, Central Station, at the northeast corner of Charles and Eager streets in 1991. He was a host and manager at both businesses.
NEWS
By GARRY WILLS | April 18, 1991
Last week was a sad one for New York's sentimentalists. The last Automat closed, and Grand Central Station stopped sending out and receiving long-range trains. Progress is pricey.When I first went to New York, in 1957, the Automats were everywhere. The fast food of their day, they had 30 times the range of choices one can find at fast-food places now. People who were careful of their pennies could take a dish out of one window, eat it and see if it sufficed, and if not, take another. Then one could get pie and coffee and linger over them, reading a book or the papers and magazines scattered around.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 5, 1996
In the review of Central Station in the Aug. 15 issue of Live, there were several errors.Lunch hours for the restaurant are 11: 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays. Dinners hours are 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. Sundays through Thursdays and until midnight on Fridays and Saturdays. Sunday brunch is from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.Lunch prices are $2.95 to $8.95 for appetizers and $4.95 to $8.50 for entrees. Dinner prices are $2.95 to $8.95 for appetizers and $4.95 to $22.50 for entrees. Brunch prices are $2.95 to $6.95 for appetizers and $4.95 to $12.95 for entrees.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Laura Rottenberg and Laura Rottenberg,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | August 15, 1996
In the review of Central Station in the Aug. 15 issue of Live, there were several errors.Lunch hours for the restaurant are 11: 30 a.m. to 5 p.m. Mondays through Saturdays. Dinners hours are 5 p.m. to 11 p.m. Sundays through Thursdays and until midnight on Fridays and Saturdays. Sunday brunch is from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m.Lunch prices are $2.95 to $8.95 for appetizers and $4.95 to $8.50 for entrees. Dinner prices are $2.95 to $8.95 for appetizers and $4.95 to $22.50 for entrees. Brunch prices are $2.95 to $6.95 for appetizers and $4.95 to $12.95 for entrees.
FEATURES
By Ellen Gamerman and Ellen Gamerman,SUN NATIONAL STAFF | November 14, 2002
WASHINGTON - Coming soon to TV: Capitol Hill with no ugly people, limited monotony and much better clothes. A new drama about the Senate and a sitcom about the House are in the lineup to replace a couple of fall programs that already flopped this fall. The aim is to mine Congress for sex, lies, intrigue and anything else in short supply on C-Span. This idea might have inspired more confidence a few years ago, when The West Wing rose to prominence, but finding pop-culture appeal in Washington is a risky enterprise.
NEWS
By Jamie Stiehm and Jamie Stiehm,SUN STAFF | April 9, 2002
Four Baltimore-based development firms, including one that worked on renovating New York's Grand Central Station, are to announce plans today to revive the open-air market atmosphere that characterized Belvedere Square in its heyday. Mayor Martin O'Malley is expected to announce that a $16 million deal to revitalize the ailing shopping center -- a flourishing gathering place only a decade ago -- has been hammered out during the past year, involving public and private investment and buying the retail center from James J. Ward III. City officials said the only new tenant signed up is Loyola College, which will lease 10,000 square feet for office space for speech and hearing therapy and a doctoral program.
NEWS
July 1, 2000
Vernon T. Liphart, 45, co-manager of 2 city bars Vernon Thomas Liphart, co-manager of Central Station, a Mount Vernon bar, died Tuesday of cancer at Greater Baltimore Medical Center. He was 45 and lived in Bolton Hill. In 1986, he assisted in the opening of the Allegro nightclub at 1101 Cathedral St., also in Mount Vernon. With Donald Davis, his life partner of 26 years, he opened a second nightspot, Central Station, at the northeast corner of Charles and Eager streets in 1991. He was a host and manager at both businesses.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Elizabeth Large and Elizabeth Large,Sun Restaurant Critic | May 20, 1999
St. Michael's MorselsJeff Trainor, a '94 graduate of the Baltimore International College, has opened a new restaurant in St. Michaels to rave reviews. Morsels, located at 205 Talbot St., offers imaginative Mediterranean dishes like spinach risotto with sauteed shrimp, Mandarin oranges and slivered almonds."It's light and healthy food," promises Trainor.The restaurant is tiny, just 33 seats. He describes it as having a casual atmosphere, "cozy, bright and colorful."Morsels serves lunch and dinner Wednesday through Saturday and brunch only on Sunday.
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 12, 1999
We've seen it before: Bizarre circumstances bring two mismatched people together; they embark on a road trip, encounter an assortment of colorful characters and wind up bonded forever.If you thought this formula had outworn any possibility of invention, see "Central Station," Walter Salles' extraordinary movie that brings deep emotions to the surface even when it maintains a deceptive simplicity.Carried by a performance of monumental proportions by the Brazilian actress Fernanda Montenegro (who was nominated this week for a best actress Oscar)
FEATURES
By Ann Hornaday and Ann Hornaday,SUN FILM CRITIC | February 5, 1999
When Steven Spielberg's World War II drama "Saving Private Ryan" returns to theaters today, many Baltimore filmgoers will marvel at the movie's extraordinary depiction of the events of June 6, 1944, when American troops invaded the beaches of Normandy.But what many will not know is that many of the men portrayed in the scene were from Maryland. Historian Joseph Balkoski, whose book "Beyond the Beachhead: The 29th Infantry Division in Normandy," would like to remind local audiences that a piece of Maryland history is up on screen.
FEATURES
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 7, 1996
If I were to fly from New York to Milan, how would I get from there to Siena, by train or bus? And are there any chauffeur services that could make the trip?The most convenient way of getting from Milan to Siena is to take a train to Florence and then board a bus to Siena, which is easier than it sounds, as the bus depot is in front of the train station in Florence. Trains also run from Florence to Siena, but many require a change in Empoli.Chauffeured cars are available but you would have to be prepared to pay at least $300 one way.The following train choices start out from Milan in the morning (there are other departures in the afternoon and evening)
FEATURES
By John-John Williams IV and John-John Williams IV,sun reporter | February 20, 2007
With a few button taps on his cellular flip phone and a vague, catchy message, bartender Sean O'Donnell can almost guarantee that he can double his business on a given night. O'Donnell has been using text messages for the past year to attract patrons to his bar in Mount Vernon, Grand Central Station. "I try to make them witty or funny," O'Donnell said. "That way if they can't come, they can still get a laugh out of it." Bartenders are using text messages to attract their regulars and tell them where they are working that night.
BUSINESS
By Kevin L. McQuaid and Kevin L. McQuaid,SUN STAFF | May 3, 1998
It's like Grand Central station in here.Exhibit A: Construction workers in paint-stained jeans pull the triggers on screaming electric saws as others strain to control concrete-punishing jackhammers. The din is overwhelming.Exhibit B: Amid the noise, steel scaffolding, orange mesh construction fence and makeshift drywall barriers, wide-eyed commuters hustle by from every direction, oblivious to the melee around them.It is Grand Central station in here.The world's most famous train terminal, crippled by years of traffic and neglect, is undergoing a $200 million renovation courtesy of New York state, a program intended to make the 85-year-old hub both aesthetically pleasing and economically viable.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Karol V. Menzie,SUN STAFF | January 8, 1997
When Hilton Braithwaite began working in restaurants in his native Cambridge, Mass., while still in high school, he knew he was making money. "But I didn't know what I was acquiring was a trade," he said. "That I could always find work."These days, after a stint as a photography teacher at Howard University, he is back to being a chef, at Mount Vernon's Central Station restaurant.Photography and cooking have always been the two driving factors in Braithwaite's life. He finds both challenging and rewarding, and cooking is always there if art leads to lean times.
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