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By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 28, 1999
NEW YORK - The federal government has joined the Oneida Indians in a lawsuit that contends the state and local governments unlawfully acquired 270,000 acres of land in central New York from the Indians nearly 200 years ago, whittling down what had been a sprawling reservation into a 32-acre plot.Though the Oneidas' land claim has been wending its way through federal courts since 1970, the victim of fruitless settlement negotiations between the Indians and three New York governors, the intervention of the Justice Department has focused the attention of state and local officials on the case.
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By JONI GUHNE and JONI GUHNE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 2, 2005
Things have changed for Jim Atwell since he took early retirement in 1992 from his administrative job at Anne Arundel Community College and headed off to the tiny hamlet of Fly Creek, N.Y., to mourn the loss of his first wife and to regroup. Today, he lives in the 210-year-old farmhouse on 40 acres in central New York that he and Gwen Vosburgh Atwell, his first wife, purchased for their retirement. He manages the small farm, writes a weekly column for the local paper, the Cooperstown Cryer, is active in his adopted community - he serves on the cemetery board, among other things - and is happily married again, to artist Anne Geddes-Atwell.
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NEWS
By JONI GUHNE and JONI GUHNE,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | December 2, 2005
Things have changed for Jim Atwell since he took early retirement in 1992 from his administrative job at Anne Arundel Community College and headed off to the tiny hamlet of Fly Creek, N.Y., to mourn the loss of his first wife and to regroup. Today, he lives in the 210-year-old farmhouse on 40 acres in central New York that he and Gwen Vosburgh Atwell, his first wife, purchased for their retirement. He manages the small farm, writes a weekly column for the local paper, the Cooperstown Cryer, is active in his adopted community - he serves on the cemetery board, among other things - and is happily married again, to artist Anne Geddes-Atwell.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 28, 1999
NEW YORK - The federal government has joined the Oneida Indians in a lawsuit that contends the state and local governments unlawfully acquired 270,000 acres of land in central New York from the Indians nearly 200 years ago, whittling down what had been a sprawling reservation into a 32-acre plot.Though the Oneidas' land claim has been wending its way through federal courts since 1970, the victim of fruitless settlement negotiations between the Indians and three New York governors, the intervention of the Justice Department has focused the attention of state and local officials on the case.
FEATURES
By Peter Whoriskey and Peter Whoriskey,Knight Ridder/Tribune | December 6, 1998
Grand Central Terminal has become a synonym for modern chaos, so maybe it was easy to forget about the building's classical splendor: Its crowning statue of Mercury; its grand bronze clock; its barrel-vaulted ceiling painted blue with lighted gold-leaf stars; its nickel- and gold-plated chandeliers; the monumental echoes within its stone main hall; its symmetry and pomp. Anyway, over the years, its charms had slowly disappeared.Turns out it was all there, all along, hidden under 85 years of soot, billboard clutter and bad additions.
SPORTS
January 22, 1993
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NEWS
By New York Times News Service | October 7, 1992
The highest-ranking Episcopal priest in the nation, who headed a national committee examining the church's position on sexuality and the priesthood, has resigned following charges that he sexually abused young men in his upstate New York congregation, church officials announced yesterday.The allegations surrounding the priest, the Rev. Wallace A. Frey, rector of St. David's Church in the Syracuse suburb of DeWitt, N.Y., are expected to stir uncertainty as the 2.4 million-member Episcopal Church continues to struggle with the issue of ordaining homosexuals, a debate that dominated the denomination's General Convention last year.
NEWS
By JACQUES KELLY | April 23, 2009
Walter Andrew Romans Sr., a retired golf professional who worked at the Baltimore County Club for nearly four decades, died in his sleep April 16 at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Homeland resident was 93. Born in Warren, Mass., and raised in Utica, N.Y., he became a caddie as a teen to help support his family after his father's death. "He kept coming back, working hard and asking questions. He learned the importance of yardage, how to read the greens and, most important of all, friendly customer service," said his son, Walter Andrew Romans Jr. of Brookeville.
NEWS
By Jay Apperson and Jay Apperson,SUN STAFF | December 15, 1998
SCHENECTADY, N.Y. -- Forget Beverly Hills 90210. The cool ZIP code for kids is North Pole 12345.Actually, the 12345 ZIP is exclusively assigned to a sprawling General Electric plant in Schenectady. But come December, the GE mailroom brims with letters addressed to Candy Lane or Iceberg Drive or Chillyville, North Pole. They all carry urgent messages for Santa Claus, and they all carry that child-friendly ZIP code."Whatever it is, they seem to write 12345," said Linda Susi, one of more than a dozen GE employees who sat down yesterday to spend a long lunch helping harried ol' St. Nick keep up with his correspondence.
NEWS
By Jennifer McMenamin and Jennifer McMenamin,SUN STAFF | September 17, 2004
BINGHAMTON, N.Y. - In a quiet, riverfront city nestled among the hills of central New York, a man goes on trial, accused of killing his mother-in-law and her 14-year-old daughter, execution-style. Homicides are rare here - there has been only one this year - and crimes as violent and deliberate as the shootings of Valerie and Devin Spears are all but unheard of. To understand why the woman and her daughter were killed, a prosecutor told a Broome County, N.Y., jury this week, you have to look about 260 miles south: to Baltimore County.
FEATURES
By Peter Whoriskey and Peter Whoriskey,Knight Ridder/Tribune | December 6, 1998
Grand Central Terminal has become a synonym for modern chaos, so maybe it was easy to forget about the building's classical splendor: Its crowning statue of Mercury; its grand bronze clock; its barrel-vaulted ceiling painted blue with lighted gold-leaf stars; its nickel- and gold-plated chandeliers; the monumental echoes within its stone main hall; its symmetry and pomp. Anyway, over the years, its charms had slowly disappeared.Turns out it was all there, all along, hidden under 85 years of soot, billboard clutter and bad additions.
NEWS
March 27, 2003
On March 25, 2003, ELAINE V.; loving wife of the late Angelo J. Quaranta; devoted mother of David A. Quaranta and Sharon L. Ward; beloved sister of Sarah Jane Cronin; cherished grandmother of Jaz and Cadence Quaranta, Ashley Winterling, and Angela Kraus. The family will receive friends in the LEMMON FUNERAL HOME OF DULANEY VALLEY, INC., 10 W. Padonia Road (at York Road), Timonium-Cockeysville, on Friday from 7 to 9 P.M. A funeral service will be celebrated in the funeral home on Saturday, March 29 at 10 A.M. Interment Dulaney Valley Memorial Gardens.
NEWS
By Brendan Lyons and Brendan Lyons,ALBANY TIMES UNION | October 27, 2002
BOLTON, N.Y. - The sonar ping ricocheted off the dead man's body and rang in the ear of the New York State Police scuba diver. At 140 feet below the surface of Lake George, Trooper Chuck Ford Sr. was about to make the deepest recovery of a body on record for the 68-year-old State Police Scuba Unit. "I was on the guy in six minutes," Ford, a longtime trooper from central New York, said as he recounted the Sept. 1 recovery. Recovering the bodies of people killed in accidents or by foul play is only one responsibility of a unit called on in high-profile missions.
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