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NEWS
October 1, 2001
THIS YEAR'S GOAL of $45 million for the United Way of Central Maryland's annual campaign is a moderate 4.2 percent more than last year's result. But the downsizing of several of the largest work forces that contribute, and the pessimistic economic climate, make that goal harder to reach. And the same forces create a likelihood that demand for the services of voluntary health and human service agencies will increase more than that percentage. But a distraction intervened on the way to the pledge drive at most workplaces: The nation suffered the agony of the Sept.
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BUSINESS
By Nancy Jones-Bonbrest and Nancy Jones-Bonbrest,Special to The Baltimore Sun | April 19, 2009
Salary: $40,000 Age: 27 Time on the job: Three months How she got started: Although Katie Cashman wanted to work with children after graduating from Towson University with a degree in psychology, she couldn't find the right job, so she went to work as a program manager at an adult day care. She quickly found her niche working with seniors and moved on to become the manager of an assisted-living facility in Frederick. She then worked as the resident services and admissions coordinator at Fairhaven, a continuing-care retirement facility in Sykesville.
NEWS
By Timothy B. Wheeler and Timothy B. Wheeler,SUN STAFF | September 18, 1995
The weekend's downpour may splash green on parched lawns across Maryland and ease the threat of wildfires, but it's too little, too late for many farmers' withered summer crops.The first soaking rain since early August brought one to two inches across central Maryland on Saturday night and early yesterday, weather observers said. Baltimore-Washington International Airport received 1.98 inches, according to the National Weather Service, while Pikesville recorded the most, at 2.10 inches. Frederick and Cumberland in Western Maryland, by comparison, got 1.15 and 1.30 inches through yesterday, while on the Eastern Shore Easton got 1.18 inches and Salisbury 0.95 inches.
BUSINESS
By Timothy J. Mullaney | January 14, 1991
Norman O. Taylor will be taking on one of the most visible jobs in town when he moves to Baltimore next month to be president of the United Way of Central Maryland, but it's more than his job that will make him easy to spot."
NEWS
By Frank D. Roylance and Frank D. Roylance,SUN STAFF | August 28, 2002
The forecast said rain, but it was sunshine that poured down on Gov. Parris N. Glendening yesterday as he unveiled tougher emergency water restrictions for drought-stricken Central and Eastern Maryland. Standing on a boat ramp more than 20 feet below the normal surface of rain-starved Liberty Reservoir, Glendening invoked Level Two water-use restrictions that tighten drought-emergency rules he imposed on much of Central Maryland in April and expanded the rules' reach to the Eastern Shore.
FEATURES
By Jennifer Davis, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2011
It was a night of eating, drinking, shopping and fundraising at Towson Town Center's Sip Savor Shop event Thursday night, benefiting the United Way of Central Maryland. Wineries, restaurants and big name retailers teamed up to provide guests with an enjoyable approach to raising money for charity. Some guests turned the event into a girl's night. Paula Phillips of Baltimore heard about the benefit through her friend. "I like the variety. There's food, wine and coupons," Phillips said.
NEWS
September 3, 2000
UNITED WAY is the single enterprise that unites most Central Marylanders. Among all civic endeavors, it creates the deepest sense of community over the broadest area. Death and taxes are more universal, but United Way is voluntary. In order to give, an individual must first have decided to do so. United Way is a measurable indicator of how a community feels about itself. It involves a bit of giving to those in need -- from whom we all would hope for a helping hand were situations reversed.
NEWS
By Janet Gilbert | June 15, 2011
My son and I visited a small, private, reputable liberal arts college about 500 miles south of Baltimore during its "Welcome High School Juniors Weekend" a few months ago. We spent a beautifully orchestrated day interacting with so many students who looked exactly like us that it almost felt like we had been on a tour of The Sims University. Because this is my third and final child entering the college vetting process, I knew enough not to extol the school's merits or denigrate its shortcomings and risk prejudicing my son's impressions.
NEWS
By Edward Gunts and Edward Gunts,SUN STAFF | June 1, 2000
LIKE MANY NONPROFIT organizations in Central Maryland, The Associated: Jewish Community Federation of Baltimore relies on volunteers to support the work of its paid staff. But the organization didn't have sufficient room to welcome and accommodate its many affiliates, "lay leaders" and visitors until this spring, when it completed a $3.5 million expansion and renovation of its 20-year-old headquarters at 101 W. Mount Royal Ave., called the Associated Krieger Building. The three-story, 13,500-square-foot addition contains conference rooms, offices and other meeting spaces that are booked from morning to night by committees and subcommittees of The Associated or others.
NEWS
By Laura Lippmann | November 25, 1990
This could be a day in your life.Get up, take the kids to school. One has a field trip to the National Aquarium; the other has to go to Girl Scouts after school. Try to figure out who's going to pick up whom, who's going to fix dinner. Remind your spouse to attend a Red Cross course in CPR. Go to University Hospital and visit a sick relative. Fall asleep to Ella Fitzgerald, singing on WJHU.Before you drift off, remember to be grateful that at least no one in your family needs help from the area's non-profit sector.
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