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By Jill Rosen | January 10, 2010
Otis Rolley III, president of the Central Maryland Transportation Alliance, hopes the incoming mayor understands that for any city, transportation issues are critical and far-ranging, touching people's lives in dozens of ways. "It can really be a catalytic investment in terms of transforming Baltimore," says Rolley, formerly Baltimore's planning director and chief of staff to Mayor Sheila Dixon. Rolley would urge Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake to use her office as a bully pulpit to improve bus service.
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NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
Six-year-old Rey Powell sat next to his father, nose pressed against the window on the MARC train Saturday as he headed from Union Station in Washington to Penn Station in Baltimore aboard one of the system's first weekend trains. The two planned to grab a taxi once they arrived for a visit to the National Aquarium — a father-and-son getaway for the boy's birthday. "We love trains, and it takes away the hassle of driving," said his father, Rey Powell of Gaithersburg. No one's sure how many weekend riders the MARC train will carry to and from Baltimore on its new, expanded Saturday and Sunday service, but Charm City marketing experts and transportation officials expect to collect on the state's $46 million venture in more places than just the fare box. Curators and event planners, sports stadium managers and real estate brokers say they anticipate that the new train service will enable them to tap into a bigger tourism market, connecting them to regional travelers and visitors flying into Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport seven days a week.
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NEWS
By Jill Rosen | January 10, 2010
Otis Rolley III, president of the Central Maryland Transportation Alliance, hopes the incoming mayor understands that for any city, transportation issues are critical and far-ranging, touching people's lives in dozens of ways. "It can really be a catalytic investment in terms of transforming Baltimore," says Rolley, formerly Baltimore's planning director and chief of staff to Mayor Sheila Dixon. Rolley would urge Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake to use her office as a bully pulpit to improve bus service.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2010
Principal Ed Cozzolino doesn't rely on the bus to get to his job at Green Street Academy in Baltimore, but nearly every afternoon he sympathizes with his nearly 100 middle and high school students who do. Cozzolino has endured the hot, cold, rain and snow waiting for up to two hours at the No. 23 bus stop on Edmondson Avenue for a bus to make its first attempt to pick up students, or for another one to stop when a driver has opted to pass by...
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
The Central Maryland Transportation Alliance, a 3-year-old advocacy group, has named a former head of the Downtown Partnership as its new leader and is charting an agenda with an emphasis on public transit improvements. The alliance, a privately funded organization of businesses and community groups, announced Wednesday the appointment of Michele L. Whelley, a longtime Baltimore resident who spent the past two years working in Connecticut, as president and chief executive officer.
NEWS
By Yvonne Wenger and Natalie Sherman, The Baltimore Sun | December 7, 2013
Six-year-old Rey Powell sat next to his father, nose pressed against the window on the MARC train Saturday as he headed from Union Station in Washington to Penn Station in Baltimore aboard one of the system's first weekend trains. The two planned to grab a taxi once they arrived for a visit to the National Aquarium — a father-and-son getaway for the boy's birthday. "We love trains, and it takes away the hassle of driving," said his father, Rey Powell of Gaithersburg. No one's sure how many weekend riders the MARC train will carry to and from Baltimore on its new, expanded Saturday and Sunday service, but Charm City marketing experts and transportation officials expect to collect on the state's $46 million venture in more places than just the fare box. Curators and event planners, sports stadium managers and real estate brokers say they anticipate that the new train service will enable them to tap into a bigger tourism market, connecting them to regional travelers and visitors flying into Baltimore-Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport seven days a week.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman | laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | December 3, 2009
Baltimore City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake can do little more than wait - at least publicly - before learning whether or when she becomes mayor. By law, the council president automatically becomes the chief executive if the office becomes vacant, and Mayor Sheila Dixon's criminal conviction this week could force her out under the state constitution. But Dixon's lawyers are considering whether to challenge the verdict and a suspension, and Dixon insists that for now, she's on the job. That means Rawlings-Blake has scant opportunity to prepare for the responsibilities she might soon undertake as budget woes and crime problems demand City Hall's full attention.
NEWS
By Erica L. Green, The Baltimore Sun | September 30, 2010
Principal Ed Cozzolino doesn't rely on the bus to get to his job at Green Street Academy in Baltimore, but nearly every afternoon he sympathizes with his nearly 100 middle and high school students who do. Cozzolino has endured the hot, cold, rain and snow waiting for up to two hours at the No. 23 bus stop on Edmondson Avenue for a bus to make its first attempt to pick up students, or for another one to stop when a driver has opted to pass by...
NEWS
April 29, 2013
Mark Montgomery, president and CEO of Ports America Chesapeake, will be the guest speaker at the BWI Business Partnership's May signature breakfast and annual transportation forum, Wednesday, May 15, from 7:45 to 9:15 a.m. at the BWI Airport Marriott, 1743 West Nursery Road, in Linthicum. Ports America, the largest terminal operator in America, is responsible for the widening of the berth at Seagirt Marine Terminal in Baltimore. The Port of Baltimore is one of only two ports on the East Coast that will be able to accommodate the super-sized ships expected to arrive through the expanded Panama Canal in 2014.Montgomery was honored as the Baltimore Museum of Industry's Industrialist of the Year in 2012.
NEWS
December 20, 2010
In his December 17th article "Maryland ranks dead last among states in quick commutes," Michael Dresser cites the 2005-2009 U.S. Census American Community Survey, which states that Maryland is second only to New York in length of commute to work. This research underscores the fact that transportation — or lack thereof — is a significant factor that impacts decisions on where people choose to work and live. While the same survey ranks Maryland as the nation's wealthiest state, more and more Maryland residents must sacrifice quality of life in order to access employment opportunities and/or affordable housing, sacrifices that are increasingly placing the state at a competitive disadvantage in attracting the talent needed by our top employers.
FEATURES
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | June 2, 2010
The Central Maryland Transportation Alliance, a 3-year-old advocacy group, has named a former head of the Downtown Partnership as its new leader and is charting an agenda with an emphasis on public transit improvements. The alliance, a privately funded organization of businesses and community groups, announced Wednesday the appointment of Michele L. Whelley, a longtime Baltimore resident who spent the past two years working in Connecticut, as president and chief executive officer.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen | January 10, 2010
Otis Rolley III, president of the Central Maryland Transportation Alliance, hopes the incoming mayor understands that for any city, transportation issues are critical and far-ranging, touching people's lives in dozens of ways. "It can really be a catalytic investment in terms of transforming Baltimore," says Rolley, formerly Baltimore's planning director and chief of staff to Mayor Sheila Dixon. Rolley would urge Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake to use her office as a bully pulpit to improve bus service.
NEWS
By Jill Rosen | January 10, 2010
Otis Rolley III, president of the Central Maryland Transportation Alliance, hopes the incoming mayor understands that for any city, transportation issues are critical and far-ranging, touching people's lives in dozens of ways. "It can really be a catalytic investment in terms of transforming Baltimore," says Rolley, formerly Baltimore's planning director and chief of staff to Mayor Sheila Dixon. Rolley would urge Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake to use her office as a bully pulpit to improve bus service.
NEWS
By Laura Smitherman | laura.smitherman@baltsun.com | December 3, 2009
Baltimore City Council President Stephanie C. Rawlings-Blake can do little more than wait - at least publicly - before learning whether or when she becomes mayor. By law, the council president automatically becomes the chief executive if the office becomes vacant, and Mayor Sheila Dixon's criminal conviction this week could force her out under the state constitution. But Dixon's lawyers are considering whether to challenge the verdict and a suspension, and Dixon insists that for now, she's on the job. That means Rawlings-Blake has scant opportunity to prepare for the responsibilities she might soon undertake as budget woes and crime problems demand City Hall's full attention.
NEWS
January 18, 2014
As I've followed the news about the scandal surrounding New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie, I am probably not alone in being moved by one of the stories that emerged from the release of emails among his staff. A woman had complained to The Port Authority of New York and New Jersey that her husband, who had been out of work for more than a year, was 40 minutes late to his first day at a new job because he was caught in the traffic jam on the George Washington Bridge. I wince thinking about that man watching the minutes tick by and knowing that his chances of making a positive impression on a long sought-after job were diminished.
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