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By New York Times News Service Z | December 2, 1991
LONDON -- Detectives from Scotland Yard yesterday warned the British public to be "extremely vigilant" after a series of pre-dawn firebombs damaged shops in central London and the police discovered an explosives cache in a garage in London's East End.The firebombings, which caused extensive property damage but resulted in no injuries, were believed to be the work of the Irish Republican Army, according to Cmdr. George Churchill-Coleman, the chief of Scotland Yard's anti-terrorist squad.Hundreds of people were evacuated from apartments and homes in central London for several hours earlier yesterday, as firefighters fought blazes caused by the devices.
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TRAVEL
By James Gilden and James Gilden,Los Angeles Times | September 10, 2006
LONDON -- Hotel guests have strange requests. Consider the American who asked the concierge at the Four Seasons Hotel London for a dresser to help his wife through the many steps it takes to don a traditional kimono. It was 4 p.m. Christmas Eve. He needed the dresser at 8. Then there was the family whose nanny left her passport at the hotel and then got stuck in immigration in Dubai. The concierge put a porter with the nanny's passport on the next plane to Dubai, where he rescued the stranded nanny, did a bit of duty-free shopping and returned on the next plane to London.
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NEWS
December 7, 1996
John Vassall, 71, who admitted spying for the KGB and was sent to prison in 1962, died Nov. 18 of a heart attack in London.Vassall, who changed his name to John Phillips after he was freed in 1972, was blackmailed into spying for the Soviet Union after being photographed with a homosexual partner when he was a junior naval attache in the British Embassy in Moscow in the 1950s.When his apartment in central London was raided in 1962, intelligence agents found 140 photographs of secret documents.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Speer Morgan and Speer Morgan,Special to the Sun | January 23, 2000
"Saving Agnes," by Rachel Cusk. Picador. 224 pages. $23. Rachel Cusk's second novel is a modest, old-fashioned tale of a well-educated young woman trying to find her place in the world. Cusk, whose first novel , "The Country Life," won the Whitbread Prize, doesn't give us much reason to be interested in Agnes. She is sharing a house in London with a nice but neurotically companionable roommate named Merlin and with Nina, another woman her age. She's dating a creep, yet the inevitable demise of their relationship leaves her, and possibly some of the readers of this novel, almost too disappointed to want to go on. Agnes' yearning is so intense that she is blind to what's going on around her. But blind though she may be, we are intrigued by how intently she is searching.
NEWS
By Michele Nevard and Michele Nevard,London Bureau | February 3, 1993
LONDON -- In 1123, Rahere, court jester to Henry I, suffered an attack of malaria on a pilgrimage to Rome. He vowed to set up a hospital on his return to London.Henry I granted him some land in Smithfield in the City of London and he founded St. Bartholomew's Hospital and a priory.St. Bartholomew's Hospital is still going, the oldest hospital in London. But it is in grave danger of being closed down. The final decision will be made tomorrow.London is served by 12 major undergraduate teaching hospitals and eight postgraduate special health authority hospitals.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Speer Morgan and Speer Morgan,Special to the Sun | January 23, 2000
"Saving Agnes," by Rachel Cusk. Picador. 224 pages. $23. Rachel Cusk's second novel is a modest, old-fashioned tale of a well-educated young woman trying to find her place in the world. Cusk, whose first novel , "The Country Life," won the Whitbread Prize, doesn't give us much reason to be interested in Agnes. She is sharing a house in London with a nice but neurotically companionable roommate named Merlin and with Nina, another woman her age. She's dating a creep, yet the inevitable demise of their relationship leaves her, and possibly some of the readers of this novel, almost too disappointed to want to go on. Agnes' yearning is so intense that she is blind to what's going on around her. But blind though she may be, we are intrigued by how intently she is searching.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | July 16, 1991
LONDON -- William Leithlaw didn't even notice that President Bush and the other leaders of the world's richest countries have swept into town this week to practice economics at the highest level.He never reads the papers. He hasn't got a television set, or a room to watch it in.Lounging in his blanket in a doorway on Chancery Lane, scratching his beard, Mr. Leithlaw was practicing economics at the lowest level: trying to figure out how he was going to make it through the rest of the week on what he had left of his $60 disability payment.
TRAVEL
By James Gilden and James Gilden,Los Angeles Times | September 10, 2006
LONDON -- Hotel guests have strange requests. Consider the American who asked the concierge at the Four Seasons Hotel London for a dresser to help his wife through the many steps it takes to don a traditional kimono. It was 4 p.m. Christmas Eve. He needed the dresser at 8. Then there was the family whose nanny left her passport at the hotel and then got stuck in immigration in Dubai. The concierge put a porter with the nanny's passport on the next plane to Dubai, where he rescued the stranded nanny, did a bit of duty-free shopping and returned on the next plane to London.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | January 22, 2006
LONDON -- Despite rescue efforts, a 17-foot-long northern bottlenose whale that had strayed into the Thames in central London died yesterday, the rescue team said. The whale, from a deep-water species usually found in the North Atlantic, had been in the river since Thursday, drawing thousands of onlookers as it swam past the Houses of Parliament on Friday. It died as marine specialists escorted it on a barge down the Thames toward the sea, the British Divers Marine Life Rescue group said last night.
FEATURES
By New York Times News Service h | August 25, 1991
A new organization called Home Hosting arranges for visitors to London to sit down to a traditional English tea -- with sandwiches, scones and jam and clotted cream, and homemade cake, all served with the host's best china and silver -- in private homes in London.The hosts live in central London, mostly in the Kensington section and near Marble Arch. The cost is 10 pounds -- about $17.50 -- a person.The English hosts are chosen because of an interest in travel and meeting overseas visitors, and can offer tips and information about London.
NEWS
December 7, 1996
John Vassall, 71, who admitted spying for the KGB and was sent to prison in 1962, died Nov. 18 of a heart attack in London.Vassall, who changed his name to John Phillips after he was freed in 1972, was blackmailed into spying for the Soviet Union after being photographed with a homosexual partner when he was a junior naval attache in the British Embassy in Moscow in the 1950s.When his apartment in central London was raided in 1962, intelligence agents found 140 photographs of secret documents.
NEWS
By Michele Nevard and Michele Nevard,London Bureau | February 3, 1993
LONDON -- In 1123, Rahere, court jester to Henry I, suffered an attack of malaria on a pilgrimage to Rome. He vowed to set up a hospital on his return to London.Henry I granted him some land in Smithfield in the City of London and he founded St. Bartholomew's Hospital and a priory.St. Bartholomew's Hospital is still going, the oldest hospital in London. But it is in grave danger of being closed down. The final decision will be made tomorrow.London is served by 12 major undergraduate teaching hospitals and eight postgraduate special health authority hospitals.
NEWS
By New York Times News Service Z | December 2, 1991
LONDON -- Detectives from Scotland Yard yesterday warned the British public to be "extremely vigilant" after a series of pre-dawn firebombs damaged shops in central London and the police discovered an explosives cache in a garage in London's East End.The firebombings, which caused extensive property damage but resulted in no injuries, were believed to be the work of the Irish Republican Army, according to Cmdr. George Churchill-Coleman, the chief of Scotland Yard's anti-terrorist squad.Hundreds of people were evacuated from apartments and homes in central London for several hours earlier yesterday, as firefighters fought blazes caused by the devices.
NEWS
By Richard O'Mara and Richard O'Mara,London Bureau of The Sun | July 16, 1991
LONDON -- William Leithlaw didn't even notice that President Bush and the other leaders of the world's richest countries have swept into town this week to practice economics at the highest level.He never reads the papers. He hasn't got a television set, or a room to watch it in.Lounging in his blanket in a doorway on Chancery Lane, scratching his beard, Mr. Leithlaw was practicing economics at the lowest level: trying to figure out how he was going to make it through the rest of the week on what he had left of his $60 disability payment.
FEATURES
By Michael Sragow and Michael Sragow,Sun Movie Critic | March 7, 2008
The gritty heist picture The Bank Job has everything adult action fans could want, starting with a grand, fact-inspired gimmick. We're in swinging England, 1971. To defuse or destroy blackmail photographs of Princess Margaret cavorting in the Caribbean, a slick British secret agent, Tim Everett (Richard Lintern), devises a cocky plan. He coerces a Cockney beauty in a jam, an ex-model named Martine Love (Saffron Burrows), to get a crew of her old friends and local "villains" to rob a Lloyd's Bank in central London.
TRAVEL
By SAN JOSE MERCURY NEWS | March 12, 2006
Two couples are looking for a flat in London for four or five days next summer. How can we find a rental? There are several companies that offer short-term rentals of homes or apartments in London, usually near Underground stations and within walking distance of tourist sights and shopping. Always check to see what the minimum stay is. Here are a few worth checking out: Emperors Gate Short Stay Apartments (www.apartment-hotels.com) has one-bedroom suites in the southwest section of central London near several Underground stops.
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