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By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Tanya Jones and Shirley Leung contributed to this article | October 27, 1995
Riders are growing edgy about the Central Light Rail line since a South Baltimore woman was shot Monday, but they lament that they have no other way to get around."
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NEWS
By Michael Dresser and Michael Dresser,michael.dresser@baltsun.com | July 18, 2009
The Maryland Transit Administration is considering changing the front-running proposal for the Red Line to require east- and westbound light rail trains to share one track through a mile-long tunnel - a plan that might save $60 million or more but could pose operating difficulties and raise safety concerns. Building a single-track tunnel under Cooks Lane - a narrow street at the city-county line that connects Edmondson Avenue with Security Boulevard - is intended to reduce the Red Line's cost and bring it within federal funding guidelines.
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NEWS
By BARRY RASCOVAR | May 9, 1993
It's been held to imposssibly high standards and hit with a barrage of slanted statistics that puts the system in a no-win situation.It's not surprising this would happen. After all, we live in an era of instant gratification: If the new president can't perform miracles in a few days, we crucify him; if our favorite baseball team can't play like world champions in the first few weeks of the season, we turn into boo-birds; if our corporations don't produce big earnings gains each and every quarter, stockholders demand the CEO's head on a platter.
NEWS
By Barry Rascovar | September 14, 1997
NOW THAT THE CENTRAL Light Rail Line has reached Hunt Valley -- with BWI Airport and Penn Station openings just months away -- what comes next? Don't hold your breath waiting for an answer. The Glendening administration has no long-range plan to expand mass transit.The only thing on the horizon is a modest extension of the light-rail line's southern terminus into Glen Burnie and then Marley Station Mall. That scheme is only in the draft environmental-impact statement stage. Beyond it lies a giant void.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | May 18, 1992
Light rail attracted light ridership in its first business day.Mass Transit Administration officials said this morning the result came as no great surprise. They had predicted small crowds for the first several weeks of service as commuters adjust to the new $446.3 million Central Light Rail Line.Still, the turnout left most parking lots only half-full and plenty of room for passengers to stretch out inside the trains."I don't think ridership was light, it was steady," said Dianna Rosborough.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 18, 1996
Because of construction on the Patapsco River Bridge, service on the central light rail system between the Patapsco and Cromwell stations will be interrupted from 9 p.m. tonight until 5 a.m. Monday.MTA shuttle buses will run every 15 minutes between the Patapsco and Cromwell stations.Information: 410-539-5000.Pub Date: 10/18/96
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,Staff Writer | May 17, 1992
In Pittsburgh, it's the "T." In Portland, Ore., the "MAX." Los Angeles simply calls it the "Blue Line."In Baltimore, the new trolley system has been bestowed a far more cumbersome moniker, the "Central Light Rail Line."Does this remind anyone of last year's dispute between Gov. William Donald "Camden Yards" Schaefer and Orioles owner Eli S. "Oriole Park" Jacobs? The result of that one was a merged name, Oriole Park at Camden Yards."This was not a compromise name," insisted Ronald J. Hartman, head of the Mass Transit Administration (MTA)
NEWS
April 29, 1993
Mass transit systems are not built overnight, nor do the blossom overnight. The Central Light Rail Line threading its way along the Jones Falls Valley through downtown to Linthicum has not met some peoples' expectations. Its white cars are not full except during the peak of rush hour and for Oriole baseball games. But neither are other forms of transportation, including the highways where cost, congestion and fumes are increasingly forcing commuters to choose mass transit.The Baltimore area's light-rail line is not yet completed.
NEWS
September 9, 1997
A TODDLER with a crayon could draw Baltimore's limited, linear rapid-rail map. The Central Light Rail, which expands today to job-rich Hunt Valley, runs 27 miles straight into downtown and south to Glen Burnie. Metro, meanwhile, runs 15 miles, from Owings Mills in northwest Baltimore County straight into downtown, then east to Johns Hopkins Hospital.These routes do not resemble the elaborate networks of intersecting squiggles and shapes that visitors and workers in places like New York and Washington heavily use. That has made it more difficult for rail travel to catch on in and around Baltimore.
NEWS
By PETER JENSEN | October 9, 1994
Take an unabashed perfectionist and put him in charge of a government agency where crises pop up hourly and a good day means things run 85 percent right.A disastrous pairing? The makings of a nervous breakdown? A doomed relationship?Maybe not.After a sometimes turbulent start, John A. Agro Jr. is gaining notice for his management of the Mass Transit Administration.Mr. Agro's boss, Maryland Transportation Secretary O. James Lighthizer, calls him the department's best manager. State legislators have commended his honesty and forthrightness.
NEWS
September 9, 1997
A TODDLER with a crayon could draw Baltimore's limited, linear rapid-rail map. The Central Light Rail, which expands today to job-rich Hunt Valley, runs 27 miles straight into downtown and south to Glen Burnie. Metro, meanwhile, runs 15 miles, from Owings Mills in northwest Baltimore County straight into downtown, then east to Johns Hopkins Hospital.These routes do not resemble the elaborate networks of intersecting squiggles and shapes that visitors and workers in places like New York and Washington heavily use. That has made it more difficult for rail travel to catch on in and around Baltimore.
NEWS
By Peter Jensen and Peter Jensen,SUN STAFF | August 17, 1997
An article in Sunday's editions about the Central Light Rail Line extension into Pennsylvania Station did not correctly identify the former B & P Railroad as the Baltimore & Potomac.The Sun regrets the errors.Denis R. Cournoyer's eyes grew wide as he studied the blueprints before him.After comparing the draftsman's strokes with a topographic map of Baltimore, he rushed out to a parking lot off Mount Royal Avenue to confirm his worst fears."Holy Mary and Joseph," said the engineer.What Cournoyer and his staff were being asked to do in spring 1993 was build a connection from Baltimore's Central Light Rail Line to Pennsylvania Station.
NEWS
BY A SUN STAFF WRITER | October 18, 1996
Because of construction on the Patapsco River Bridge, service on the central light rail system between the Patapsco and Cromwell stations will be interrupted from 9 p.m. tonight until 5 a.m. Monday.MTA shuttle buses will run every 15 minutes between the Patapsco and Cromwell stations.Information: 410-539-5000.Pub Date: 10/18/96
NEWS
By Andrea F. Siegel and Andrea F. Siegel,SUN STAFF Sun staff writers Tanya Jones and Shirley Leung contributed to this article | October 27, 1995
Riders are growing edgy about the Central Light Rail line since a South Baltimore woman was shot Monday, but they lament that they have no other way to get around."
NEWS
November 11, 1994
While there does not seem to have been any doubt that the federal government would finance the remaining segments of the Central Light Rail system, it is comforting to know the money is in the bank. With the additional $85 million pledged by the Federal Transit Administration, the central system will soon fulfill its potential. The bustling commercial area of Hunt Valley, Pennsylvania Station with its access to the the northeast rail corridor and Baltimore-Washington International Airport, with its booming commercial and industrial neighbors, all will be added to the central system.
NEWS
By PETER JENSEN | October 9, 1994
Take an unabashed perfectionist and put him in charge of a government agency where crises pop up hourly and a good day means things run 85 percent right.A disastrous pairing? The makings of a nervous breakdown? A doomed relationship?Maybe not.After a sometimes turbulent start, John A. Agro Jr. is gaining notice for his management of the Mass Transit Administration.Mr. Agro's boss, Maryland Transportation Secretary O. James Lighthizer, calls him the department's best manager. State legislators have commended his honesty and forthrightness.
NEWS
November 11, 1994
While there does not seem to have been any doubt that the federal government would finance the remaining segments of the Central Light Rail system, it is comforting to know the money is in the bank. With the additional $85 million pledged by the Federal Transit Administration, the central system will soon fulfill its potential. The bustling commercial area of Hunt Valley, Pennsylvania Station with its access to the the northeast rail corridor and Baltimore-Washington International Airport, with its booming commercial and industrial neighbors, all will be added to the central system.
NEWS
June 14, 1993
It's too early to go into mourning over the Central Light Rail Line. It is not yet filled to capacity, except at rush hour and just before or after baseball games. But no one expected that it would be.The basic line isn't complete; it won't reach Glen Burnie until July. Another leg, one that might attract a lot more riders, will not connect with BWI Airport until 1996. The main line will also reach beyond Timonium to the business-office complex at Hunt Valley by that time. Even then the light-rail cars will not reach anything near capacity.
NEWS
July 27, 1994
To light rail naysayers who insist nobody uses the trains except a few Orioles fans, we point to the most recent ridership survey. It demonstrates that the Central Light Rail Line is doing what mass transit should: take cars off the road.The survey, conducted by the Baltimore Metropolitan Council, shows 5,500 fewer cars are on the highways every weekday because people are using the trains to get to work.An impressive 70 percent of those surveyed said they use light rail to commute to or from their jobs; 46 percent said they could drive but like the train better.
NEWS
June 14, 1993
It's too early to go into mourning over the Central Light Rail Line. It is not yet filled to capacity, except at rush hour and just before or after baseball games. But no one expected that it would be.The basic line isn't complete; it won't reach Glen Burnie until July. Another leg, one that might attract a lot more riders, will not connect with BWI Airport until 1996. The main line will also reach beyond Timonium to the business-office complex at Hunt Valley by that time. Even then the light-rail cars will not reach anything near capacity.
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