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Central Intelligence Agency

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NEWS
November 19, 1995
In today's Parade Magazine, George J. Tenet, the deputy director of the Central Intelligence Agency, is misidentified as David Cohen, the deputy director of operations, in a caption accompanying a photograph on the cover.The Sun regrets the errors.
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NEWS
By Matteo Faini | January 7, 2014
Fifty years ago, Harry Truman wrote an article in the Washington Post expressing his disappointment over what the Central Intelligence Agency had become. He had established the CIA in 1947 to provide his office with objective information. But it had since "been diverted from its original assignment," Truman wrote, and "become an operational and at times a policy-making arm of the government ... injected into peacetime cloak and dagger operations. " He wanted the CIA to be restored to its original intelligence function and asked "that its operational duties be terminated or properly used elsewhere.
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NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2011
One day last year, a trusted courier for Osama bin Laden answered a phone call that might have been wholly unremarkable except for one thing — the National Security Agency was apparently listening in. That intercepted call helped American intelligence officials track the courier all the way to the walled compound in Pakistan where bin Laden was hiding. The discovery eventually led to last week's midnight assault by Navy SEALs who killed the al-Qaida leader, ending a pursuit that began in the mid-1990s.
NEWS
December 21, 2011
Last week, Congress passed legislation authorizing spending for our country's 16 intelligence agencies, including the National Security Agency, the Central Intelligence Agency and the Federal Bureau of Investigation. The fact that the bill passed with little fanfare in this heated political climate makes a big statement. The Intelligence Authorization Act for fiscal year 2012 is a good, bipartisan measure that gives our intelligence professionals the resources, capabilities and authorities they need to keep us safe.
NEWS
November 17, 1990
Services for George E. Sterling, who started the U.S. radio intelligence operations during World War II, will be held at 10 a.m. today at the Jones, Rich & Hutchins Funeral Home in Portland, Maine.Mr. Sterling, who was 96 and lived in Portland, died Wednesday at a nursing home there after a short illness.He worked for the Federal Communications Commission for many years before retiring as a member of the commission in 1954.In the 1920s, he wrote a radio manual that came to be used as a textbook by radio engineers.
BUSINESS
By Ted Shelsby and Ted Shelsby,SUN STAFF | October 11, 2001
State, federal and industry officials, including a former director of the Central Intelligence Agency, will gather at a hotel near Baltimore-Washington International Airport today to discuss Maryland's role in reducing the country's dependence on foreign energy. The all-day conference is sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy in conjunction with the state Department of Agriculture, the Maryland Energy Administration and the Maryland Department of the Environment. It will focus on plans for the construction in Maryland of a $30 million ethanol production plant.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | November 12, 1991
WASHINGTON -- A dawn has arrived at the Central Intelligence Agency.As Robert M. Gates takes the helm after a bitter six-month confirmation battle, crews who clean offices at the agency's Langley, Va., headquarters have been told to finish their work early because the new boss often arrives before sunrise.Gates was to be sworn in today in the CIA's auditorium by Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor. President Bush was to deliver remarks, officials said.There will be no pause for old wounds to heal while Gates, a 25-year veteran of the agency who is returning after three years at the White House, learns his way around.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | May 25, 2007
WASHINGTON -- In a move to reduce secrecy around the nation's spy agencies, the Senate Intelligence Committee has approved a measure to make public the total amount spent on spying and to direct the Central Intelligence Agency to release an internal report examining its failure to prevent the Sept. 11, 2001, terrorist attacks. The bill, approved in a closed session Wednesday, also would require President Bush to provide Congress with all daily intelligence briefs concerning Iraq in the six years before the war began in March 2003.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | September 15, 1991
WASHINGTON -- Robert M. Gates, President Bush's nominee to head the Central Intelligence Agency, faces new accusations that he slanted a CIA assessment of a 1981 assassination attempt on Pope John Paul II to suggest that it was masterminded by the KGB, informed sources said.The sources said that the evidence shows that Mr. Gates, then a senior CIA official, disregarded several contrary opinions by agency analysts and instead portrayed as a "consensus" the conclusion that the assassination attempt was KGB-inspired.
NEWS
August 18, 1995
Lawrence R. Houston, a founding father of the Central Intelligence Agency, died of a heart attack Tuesday while vacationing at his summer home in Westport, Mass. He was 82.In the late 1940s, he helped draft legislation that created and shaped the CIA, then served as the spy agency's general counsel from its founding in 1947 until his retirement in 1973.Mr. Houston supervised the legal work for the exchange of Soviet intelligence officer Rudolph Abel for Francis Gary Powers, the U.S. pilot whose U-2 surveillance aircraft was shot down over the former Soviet Union in 1960.
NEWS
By Scott Calvert, The Baltimore Sun | May 7, 2011
One day last year, a trusted courier for Osama bin Laden answered a phone call that might have been wholly unremarkable except for one thing — the National Security Agency was apparently listening in. That intercepted call helped American intelligence officials track the courier all the way to the walled compound in Pakistan where bin Laden was hiding. The discovery eventually led to last week's midnight assault by Navy SEALs who killed the al-Qaida leader, ending a pursuit that began in the mid-1990s.
NEWS
By Melvin A. Goodman | January 7, 2009
President-elect Barack Obama has made an outstanding move in naming Leon E. Panetta to reform the beleaguered Central Intelligence Agency. Mr. Panetta is a savvy and sophisticated political operative who was a consumer of intelligence as chief of staff in the Clinton White House in the 1990s. He is a former director of the Office of Management and Budget who understands the need for cost-cutting in the intelligence community. And as a former member of the Iraq Study Group, Mr. Panetta knows how the Bush administration and the CIA corrupted the intelligence process to take the country into an unnecessary war seven years ago. The argument against Mr. Panetta is that he is not an intelligence insider, but that is more virtue than vice.
NEWS
By David Wood and David Wood,david.wood@baltsun.com | December 22, 2008
WASHINGTON - With the expected selection of retired Adm. Dennis Blair to be the nation's senior intelligence officer, President-elect Barack Obama has put a spotlight on the Naval Academy's Class of 1968, which would fill three of the most influential national security positions. Blair would serve with 1968 classmate Adm. Mike Mullen, chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the president's top military adviser, and with Sen. Jim Webb, a Virginia Democrat who wields key influence on the Senate Foreign Relations, Armed Services and joint economic committees.
NEWS
By Melvin A. Goodman | November 14, 2008
President-elect Barack Obama is sending conflicting signals on whether he intends to change the bankrupt culture of Washington's intelligence community and to introduce genuine reform to the Central Intelligence Agency. He appears to be ready to remove the top two intelligence officials, Director of National Intelligence Mike McConnell and CIA Director Michael V. Hayden - both retired general officers - which suggests Mr. Obama recognizes the need to change the military culture of the intelligence community.
NEWS
By Melvin A. Goodman | July 17, 2008
U.S. presidents have been reluctant to reform the Central Intelligence Agency. Often, their first decision, naming a CIA director, guarantees there will be no meaningful change. Presidents from Ronald Reagan to George W. Bush named CIA directors who either were unfit for the job or politicized intelligence - or both. Three decades of mediocre appointments have created huge bureaucratic woes at the CIA that will be difficult to fix.
NEWS
By Bradley Olson and Bradley Olson,SUN REPORTER | July 7, 2008
With Congress on the verge of outlining new parameters for National Security Agency eavesdropping between suspicious foreigners and Americans, lawmakers are leaving largely untouched a host of government programs that critics say involves far more domestic surveillance than the wiretaps they sought to remedy. These programs - most of them highly classified - are run by an alphabet soup of federal intelligence and law enforcement agencies. They sift, store and analyze the communications, spending habits and travel patterns of U.S. citizens, searching for suspicious activity.
NEWS
By Newsday | February 19, 1991
WASHINGTON -- The Pentagon's official claims of destruction of Iraqi tanks, artillery and armored vehicles inside Kuwait are at least three times greater than the estimates from U.S. intelligence agencies, a U.S. official who has reviewed the intelligence figures said yesterday."
NEWS
By Charleston (W. Va.) Gazette | May 28, 1991
PRESIDENT BUSH wants Robert Gates to head the Central Intelligence Agency, a job Bush once held. President Reagan also favored Gates, but withdrew his previous nomination in 1987 as facts about the Iran-contra affair surfaced.Gates was a CIA leader when the agency waged covert warfare hidden from the American people. He helped his boss, former director William Casey, deceive Congress. Gates is "a very smart guy who ... covered his rear end" in the affair, security expert Tom Blanton says.
NEWS
February 24, 2008
Waterboarding legal when CIA used it The Sun's editorial "Standing against torture" (Feb. 19) cites Gen. Michael V. Hayden, the director of the Central Intelligence Agency, as saying that he believes waterboarding is torture. First, the CIA neither conducts nor condones torture. Second, General Hayden did not make the statement attributed to him in the editorial. General Hayden did say in congressional testimony this month that waterboarding was used on three hardened terrorists in the CIA's detention and interrogation program.
NEWS
By Jay Hancock and Jay Hancock,Sun Reporter | August 5, 2007
Legacy of Ashes The History of the CIA By Tim Weiner Doubleday / 702 pages / $27.95 In 1952, amid a stalemate in the Korean War, the Central Intelligence Agency dropped more than 1,500 Korean secret agents behind enemy lines in North Korea. The operation was overseen by the station chief in Seoul, Albert R. Haney, "a garrulous and ambitious Army colonel who boasted openly that he had thousands of men working for him on guerrilla operations and intelligence missions," writes Tim Weiner.
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