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NEWS
June 24, 1992
The civility of the breakup of Czechoslovakia, cordially agreed to by the elected Slovak leader, Vladimir Meciar, and his Czech counterpart, Vaclav Klaus, is a lesson to Yugoslavia and other federations unable to hold together. It is also a tragedy.The Czech Republic of Bohemia and Moravia, which does not want the split, can survive it well enough. Employment is high. The rapid transformation to a free market, charted by Mr. Klaus as economic minister, is working as well there as it has anywhere.
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ENTERTAINMENT
By Jonathan Pitts, The Baltimore Sun | November 27, 2013
The workmen who built the Great Wall of China ate it for strength. Sailors on early American clipper ships consumed it for health during long voyages. It has tickled Teutonic taste buds and made its way across France, England and the New World. It has never lost its in-your-face pungency, its low-calorie, high-vitamin profile - or, in modern times, its capacity to tease just the right flavors from a hot dog or Reuben sandwich. It's sauerkraut, that tartly tantalizing fermented-cabbage dish that long ago took its oddball place alongside gravy and sweet potatoes as a staple of Baltimore Thanksgiving dinners.
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TRAVEL
By EILS LOTOZO and EILS LOTOZO,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | April 9, 2006
Before the Berlin Wall fell in 1989 and heralded the ultimate toppling of the whole Soviet system, the antiques of central Europe were mostly unavailable to the rest of the world. Pieces backed up in people's cellars, attics and barns for decades. It wasn't until after the end of the Cold War that a market for antiques began to evolve again there. But these days, with vintage pieces increasingly scarce and expensive in western Europe, former Soviet bloc countries are becoming a hot spot for dealers, designers and lovers of goods that wear the patina of age. "I've seen dealers from France, Italy, the Netherlands and particularly Belgium bringing trucks to some of the places we go," says dealer Tom Conrad, who last year launched Heart of Europe Tours, offering escorted buying trips to off-the-beaten-track spots he knows well in Germany and the Czech Republic.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | November 1, 2013
 A former executive of a pan-Asian retailer will become Giant Food's next president. Gordon Reid, former group director for commercial services for Dairy Farm International, which runs more than 5,600 stores throughout Asia, will step in at Giant on Monday, Ahold USA, the parent of Landover-based Giant, said Friday. Reid replaces former Giant president Anthony Hucker, who resigned in September after two years at the helm of the Baltimore area's biggest supermarket chain.
NEWS
By David Rocks and David Rocks,Contributing Writer | March 19, 1993
PRAGUE, Czech Republic -- When Westerners working in central Europe talk about "phone strategy," they usually don't mean the kind of telecommunications that corporations spend millions to develop and implement.They're talking about survival skills that allow them to simply use the telephone."We do things like faxing to Washington in order to get a message to Prague," says Deborah Billig, an American consultant to a bank in Budapest, Hungary. "Getting calls through between Prague and Budapest is next to impossible."
NEWS
July 23, 1996
THESE ARE HEADY days for Berlin. Although Germany's largest city -- home to 3.5 million people -- will not replace Bonn as the capital until 1999, feverish construction is proof that it is reacquiring its old reputation as "the crossroads of Europe."Some $20 billion has been invested in Berlin since 1990, when the wall that had divided the city came down at the collapse of East Germany. No fewer than 1,200 cranes are counted at several hundred sites where major construction is in progress.
NEWS
By Elizabeth Pond and Elizabeth Pond,SPECIAL TO THE SUN | October 24, 1997
BUDAPEST, Hungary -- Quietly, without any fanfare, Central Europe is back. But this time around it makes for an altogether different landscape."The notion of Central Europe is gaining new importance" with the imminent admission of Hungary, Poland and the Czech Republic into NATO and the European Union, suggests Csaba Toro, a Hungarian doctoral candidate at Budapest's Central European University.Central Europeans can be seen as a "company of travelers" journeying toward the same goals, says Irena Lipowicz, a newly re-elected member of the Polish Parliament.
BUSINESS
By Ian Johnson and Ian Johnson,Contributing Writer | August 16, 1992
Vienna, Austria -- If you want to peddle Cokes, PCs, Big Macs or other products in Eastern Europe, where should you set up your business headquarters?Maybe Budapest or Prague, important capitals that are evolving? Or bustling Berlin or Bonn, which offer the strength of Europe's most powerful nation?More likely, Vienna. Although attention has been focused on united Germany's economic clout and the revolutionary changes former communist countries, tiny Austria has quietly but firmly assumed the role of Central Europe's business center.
NEWS
By Tom Hundley and Tom Hundley,CHICAGO TRIBUNE | December 12, 1998
SZEKESFEHERVAR, Hungary -- Here, in what was once the bus-manufacturing capital for the old Communist bloc, lies the answer to why Hungary has thus far been mostly immune to the financial turmoil in Russia.Drive past the pompously ornate Hapsburg facades of the old town, past the peeling paint and grimy smokestacks of the slowly dying Ikarus bus factory, down the highway a few miles through the gently rolling pastures.Suddenly, you're in the presence of some of the best-known names in the global economy.
BUSINESS
Lorraine Mirabella | November 1, 2013
 A former executive of a pan-Asian retailer will become Giant Food's next president. Gordon Reid, former group director for commercial services for Dairy Farm International, which runs more than 5,600 stores throughout Asia, will step in at Giant on Monday, Ahold USA, the parent of Landover-based Giant, said Friday. Reid replaces former Giant president Anthony Hucker, who resigned in September after two years at the helm of the Baltimore area's biggest supermarket chain.
NEWS
By Frederick N. Rasmussen, The Baltimore Sun | October 29, 2012
Marie McG. Leaf, a World War II combat nurse who cared for the wounded and dying on the battlefields of Europe, died Thursday of complications from Alzheimer's disease at the Augsburg Lutheran Home and Village in Lochearn. She was 95. The daughter of Irish immigrants, Marie Kathleen McGee was born in New York City. After her mother died when she was 3, she and her sister were sent to County Cavan in Ireland to be cared for by relatives. Her father, who had remarried, and brother moved to a home on Fulton Avenue in Baltimore.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
John J. Sweeney Jr., a retired attorney and city school board member who flew 18 bombing missions over Germany during World War II, died Monday of complications after surgery at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Timonium resident was 85. Born in Baltimore and raised on East Biddle Street and in Govans, he attended St. John the Evangelist and St. Mary's schools and was a 1942 Loyola High School graduate. Mr. Sweeney entered Loyola College in September 1942 and joined the Army Air Forces at the end of his freshman year.
NEWS
By Jim Rosapepe and Sheilah Kast | November 8, 2009
To Americans, the fall of the Berlin Wall 20 years ago this week - and the Iron Curtain with it - was more than a big move on the geostrategic chessboard. Yes, it made us safer, but it also vindicated our core national identity. Democracy, it seemed to prove, is such a universal value that it will inevitably defeat dictatorship. Since 1989, this conclusion, which spans the ideological spectrum in America, has helped drive everything from U.S. support for expansion of trade with China to the collapse of the pro-American dictator in Indonesia to the war in Iraq and continued sanctions on Myanmar and Cuba.
NEWS
By Los Angeles Times | April 3, 2008
BUCHAREST, Romania -- NATO is unlikely to immediately put Ukraine and Georgia on a course toward membership, the group's spokesman said last night, dealing a setback to President Bush, who has pushed hard to expand the 26-nation alliance to include the two countries on Russia's southern flank that had been part of the Soviet Union. However, NATO and Bush administration officials presented the question of taking the first steps that could lead to the two countries joining the North Atlantic Treaty Organization as a matter not of whether, but when, as the alliance began a summit amid controversies that go to the heart of its changing makeup and mission as it nears its seventh decade.
NEWS
By Andrea K. Walker and Andrea K. Walker,Sun reporter | November 7, 2006
Dutch food company Royal Ahold NV said yesterday that it will sell Columbia-based U.S. Foodservice, the nation's second-largest food wholesaler, as part of a major restructuring but will keep the struggling Giant Food grocery chain and try to revive it with an "everyday low price" strategy. Giant will have fewer sales, carry more private-label merchandise and limit its assortment, extending an experiment that began in its produce departments in September. Ahold also said it will improve the freshness of its foods and develop "easy-to-stock store formats that will enhance the overall customer experience in our stores, making shopping more convenient."
TRAVEL
By EILS LOTOZO and EILS LOTOZO,PHILADELPHIA INQUIRER | April 9, 2006
Before the Berlin Wall fell in 1989 and heralded the ultimate toppling of the whole Soviet system, the antiques of central Europe were mostly unavailable to the rest of the world. Pieces backed up in people's cellars, attics and barns for decades. It wasn't until after the end of the Cold War that a market for antiques began to evolve again there. But these days, with vintage pieces increasingly scarce and expensive in western Europe, former Soviet bloc countries are becoming a hot spot for dealers, designers and lovers of goods that wear the patina of age. "I've seen dealers from France, Italy, the Netherlands and particularly Belgium bringing trucks to some of the places we go," says dealer Tom Conrad, who last year launched Heart of Europe Tours, offering escorted buying trips to off-the-beaten-track spots he knows well in Germany and the Czech Republic.
NEWS
By JAMES ROUSMANIERE JR | July 23, 1991
Keene, New Hampshire. -- It's reasonable, when gauging how far liberty has advanced in newly unshackled countries, to look for the freedoms we put first in our Bill of Rights -- the freedoms of speech and press.Of course, the existence of any freedom has never guaranteed the ability to exercise it, a fact quite clear in some Third World countries where political control of legally independent newspapers is the rule.But in some other parts of the world a force considerably more complex than politics constrains a free press.
NEWS
By Jacques Kelly, The Baltimore Sun | May 14, 2010
John J. Sweeney Jr., a retired attorney and city school board member who flew 18 bombing missions over Germany during World War II, died Monday of complications after surgery at St. Joseph Medical Center. The Timonium resident was 85. Born in Baltimore and raised on East Biddle Street and in Govans, he attended St. John the Evangelist and St. Mary's schools and was a 1942 Loyola High School graduate. Mr. Sweeney entered Loyola College in September 1942 and joined the Army Air Forces at the end of his freshman year.
NEWS
By Thomas L. Friedman | November 19, 2002
WASHINGTON -- If you want to get a feel for how far ahead the U.S. military is from any of its allies, let alone its enemies, read the fascinating article in the November issue of The Atlantic Monthly by Mark Bowden about the U.S. air war over Afghanistan. There is one scene that really sums it up. It involves a U.S. F-15 jet that is ordered to take out a Taliban truck caravan. The F-15's co-pilot bombardier is a woman. Mr. Bowden, who had access to the communications between pilots, describes how the bombardier locates the truck caravan, and with her laser guidance system directs a 500-pound bomb into the lead truck.
NEWS
By William Pfaff | November 16, 1999
PARIS -- The events in Berlin 10 years ago were foreseeable more than three decades before the wall fell. They were forecast by the East Berlin workers' uprising of 1953 and again by the Hungarian revolt and Polish mutiny of 1956 and the Prague Spring of 1968. Each event was a demonstration that the Soviet "empire" in Central Europe had failed to take root. Successful empires win collaborators and converts. Some of its subjects join the rulers' side because that seems where successful careers will be made.
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