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By Trudy Rubin | September 24, 1997
TASHKENT, Uzbekistan -- Here's a geography quiz. In what region of the world did Alexander the Great score great victories, the Silk Road flourish, Islam produce some of its most renowned scholars and Tamerlane build the fabled monuments of Samarkand?Hint: Russia and Britain staged their 19th-century ''Great Game'' of spies and skirmishes across this region's forbidding deserts and mountains.Don't feel bad if you can't come up with a name. This region is just emerging from 70 years of Rip Van Winkle-like isolation from the world under Soviet rule.
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NEWS
June 11, 2008
On May 5, 2008, WILLIAM P. LENTZ. Memorial Services will be held at Emmanuel Episcopal Church, 811 Cathedral St., June 14, 2008, at 11 a.m. in lieu of flowers, friends may contribute to Emmanuel Episcopal Church or to Central Asia Institute, P.O. Box 7209, Bozeman, MT 59771-7209. That CAI assist villages in building co-educational schools in Central Asia. Alreayd 64 such schools are operating with Boys and Girls many of whom seek additional studies becoming teachers, nurses, Doctors, etc..
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NEWS
By Jonathan Power | July 15, 1996
LONDON -- The Saudi Arabian bomb has reminded the world of the politics of oil. But. looking ahead, the intrigue of the Middle East is as nothing compared with that to come in the Caucasus and Central Asia, where geo-strategic rivalries, ethnic feuding and elusive independence combine in a volatile mix.Straddling Europe, the Near East and Asia, the Caspian region is one of the largest underdeveloped sources of oil in the world. As the Persian Gulf oil is exploited to the point where its capacity and world demand intersect, this Central Asian oil will become a crucial alternative supply.
NEWS
By Anthony Day and Anthony Day,Los Angeles Times | July 22, 2007
The Road to Samarcand An Adventure By Patrick O'Brian W.W. Norton / 270 pages / $25.95 In reissuing Patrick O'Brian's 1954 novel The Road to Samarcand, the late British author's publishers remind us of the secret of his success. He knew how to tell a story. Maybe it's a talent special to those islands off the northwest coast of the European continent, watered by Atlantic mist and three major and a few minor supple languages. Maybe it's a way of passing the long, damp seasons. More likely, as the anthropologists tell us, storytelling is a device to make some sense of multiple perceptions that, taken individually, produce childhood confusion.
NEWS
May 18, 1996
IMPERIAL RUSSIA and the Soviet Union failed to link their Central Asian conquests to warm water through subversion of Iran or Pakistan. Iran, however, has succeeding in linking those now-independent Islamic republics of Central Asia with its port of Bandar Abbas at the mouth of the Persian Gulf.The opening of 100 miles of railroad in Iran from Mashhad to the border town of Sarakhs, and another 80 miles from Sarakhs to Tejen in Turkmenistan, does what Stalin, Khrushchev and Brezhnev and Gorbachev could not accomplish.
NEWS
By Anthony Day and Anthony Day,Los Angeles Times | July 22, 2007
The Road to Samarcand An Adventure By Patrick O'Brian W.W. Norton / 270 pages / $25.95 In reissuing Patrick O'Brian's 1954 novel The Road to Samarcand, the late British author's publishers remind us of the secret of his success. He knew how to tell a story. Maybe it's a talent special to those islands off the northwest coast of the European continent, watered by Atlantic mist and three major and a few minor supple languages. Maybe it's a way of passing the long, damp seasons. More likely, as the anthropologists tell us, storytelling is a device to make some sense of multiple perceptions that, taken individually, produce childhood confusion.
NEWS
By WILL ENGLUND and WILL ENGLUND,Will Englund is a Moscow correspondent for The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 1993
Tashkent, Uzbekistan. -- The mindless pop music thumps away at the "Istanbul" cellar restaurant here; the prostitutes conscientiously ply their trade at the hard-currency hotel; the markets groan with melons, carrots, spices and pistachios -- all in all, it doesn't really look like a police state.But the government is cracking down on its scattered opposition here with a vengeance.Jailings, beatings and rigged trials are giving Uzbekistan -- the largest and most important of the new countries of Central Asia -- the worst human rights record of any former Soviet republic not now engulfed in a shooting war.Uzbekistan's internal crackdown has sharply intensified this month, driving even the moderate opposition nearly to desperation.
TOPIC
By KATHY LALLY and KATHY LALLY,Kathy Lally is a Moscow correspondent for The Baltimore Sun | February 28, 1993
Dushanbe, Tajikistan. -- Communism, which Russia imposed on an unwilling Central Asia, has taken on a brutal and bloody afterlife of its own here well after Moscow pronounced the system dead.The collapse of the Soviet Union brought independence to the Muslim countries on the politically sensitive perimeter of the collapsed Soviet empire, bordering Iran, Afghanistan and China. But independence hasn't brought freedom. It has brought repression, fear and death.Here in Tajikistan, statehood was greeted with a civil war that is deadly and vicious enough to threaten all of Central Asia.
NEWS
By Rosie Mestel and Rosie Mestel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 24, 2004
Women are being infected with HIV at increasing rates in all regions of the world, and their numbers are nearly equal to those of men, according to the United Nations and World Health Organization's annual report on AIDS released yesterday. The increase among women has been especially steep in East Asia - which has experienced a 56 percent climb in the past two years - and Eastern Europe and Central Asia, where rates have risen 48 percent. In sub-Saharan Africa, 57 percent of adults living with HIV are women.
NEWS
By NEW YORK TIMES NEWS SERVICE | June 4, 2004
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon has proposed a plan to withdraw its two Army divisions from Germany and undertake an array of other changes in its European-based forces, in the most significant rearrangement of the U.S. military around the world since the beginning of the Cold War, according to U.S. and allied officials. Pentagon policy-makers said the aim is to afford maximum flexibility in sending forces to the Middle East, Central Asia and other potential battlegrounds. But some experts and allied officials are concerned that the shift will reduce Washington's influence in NATO and weaken its diplomatic links with its allies, all at a time of rising anti-American sentiment around the world.
NEWS
April 19, 2007
If the world keeps getting hotter, people aren't likely to take it lying down. If water is scarce, if food is scarce, if land is scarce (because of a rising sea level), families and tribes and nations are sure to fight for what resources they can get. Or they'll try to move to other parts of the world where conditions are better - those parts in general being in North America and Europe. In short, climate change will brew conflict. This week, a group of retired American admirals and generals issued a report pointing out that global warming is going to be a military issue.
NEWS
August 22, 2005
FOR AMERICANS whose thinking was honed by decades of Cold War, the unprecedented joint military exercise launched last week by China and Russia seems bound to set off alarms. But the broader problem faced by the United States in Asia - of its influence declining in step with China's growing economic, military and diplomatic strength - requires not knee-jerk reactions but a comprehensive strategy to date lacking in Washington. The war games, which began Thursday in the Yellow Sea off northeast China's Shandong Province, do echo the era of triangular strategy when the United States opened relations with China based partly on shared animosity to the Soviet empire.
NEWS
May 20, 2005
THINK OF IT as one of Donald H. Rumsfeld's lily pads. The 4-year-old U.S. airbase at Khanabad, Uzbekistan, provides the Pentagon with a platform from which to leapfrog fighting men and women and their machines to wherever they might be needed in the heart of Asia. The defense secretary has acknowledged that he's mightily pleased with the idea. But with Uzbekistan's authoritarian regime cracking down brutally on dissent -- brutally and counterproductively -- are the risks of Khanabad worth the benefit?
NEWS
May 15, 2005
VIOLENT PROTESTS by offended Muslims struck two Asian neighbors last week - Afghanistan and Uzbekistan. Pent-up anger - rooted more in stubborn poverty and a sense of powerlessness than in real religious grievances - drove crowds into the streets, and into harm's way when police in both countries opened fire. Though the particular local circumstances were quite different, the prospect of continuing protest and wider bloodshed in Central Asia is very real and should be very troubling to Americans.
NEWS
March 29, 2005
THEY HAVE THEIR OWN way of pulling off revolutions in Central Asia, but however peculiar the uprising in Kyrgyzstan has been so far, it holds powerful implications for an entire region of ruthless despots, crooked cops, destitute workers and radical underground Islamists. It's not quite a new day dawning for the Kyrgyz - not yet, anyway - as the squabbling for power mostly involves opposition leaders who until recently were part of the now-defunct government. They include a former police chief who may have been railroaded into prison by the previous regime but who is, after all, a former police chief.
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 24, 2005
MOSCOW - After days of tumultuous public protests, the Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan, a U.S. ally in an impoverished and restive region, may be on the brink of greater upheavals and even civil war, analysts here are warning. "The situation to me seems to be sliding into chaos," Andrei A. Piontkovsky, director of the Center for Strategic Studies said here yesterday. "And nobody knows the way out. Not Askar Akayev" - Kyrgyzstan's president - "not the opposition, not the leaders in Moscow and Washington."
NEWS
By Douglas Birch and Douglas Birch,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | March 24, 2005
MOSCOW - After days of tumultuous public protests, the Central Asian nation of Kyrgyzstan, a U.S. ally in an impoverished and restive region, may be on the brink of greater upheavals and even civil war, analysts here are warning. "The situation to me seems to be sliding into chaos," Andrei A. Piontkovsky, director of the Center for Strategic Studies said here yesterday. "And nobody knows the way out. Not Askar Akayev" - Kyrgyzstan's president - "not the opposition, not the leaders in Moscow and Washington."
NEWS
By Rosie Mestel and Rosie Mestel,LOS ANGELES TIMES | November 24, 2004
Women are being infected with HIV at increasing rates in all regions of the world, and their numbers are nearly equal to those of men, according to the United Nations and World Health Organization's annual report on AIDS released yesterday. The increase among women has been especially steep in East Asia - which has experienced a 56 percent climb in the past two years - and Eastern Europe and Central Asia, where rates have risen 48 percent. In sub-Saharan Africa, 57 percent of adults living with HIV are women.
NEWS
By Robert Ruby and Robert Ruby,SUN FOREIGN STAFF | October 20, 2004
TASHKENT, Uzbekistan - A few days after a startling series of bombings and street battles here, police came early one April morning for Nilufar Khaidarova. In a largely Muslim country in Central Asia that boasts of its secularism and its alliance with the United States, she stood out in some people's eyes for always keeping her hair covered and cloaking herself in shapeless gowns, fashions of a more conservative Islam. Her parents recall 20 armed security officers surrounding the house.
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