Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCentral American
IN THE NEWS

Central American

FEATURED ARTICLES
NEWS
By N.Y. Times News Service | November 25, 1994
In an effort to reduce auto thefts, the Clinton administration is planning a major effort to persuade Central American governments to seize stolen cars smuggled from the United States and return them, a State Department official said this week.With an estimated 20 percent of the 200,000 stolen vehicles smuggled out of the United States each year ending up in Central America, administration officials say they hope that their effort will make at least a modest impact on auto theft in the southwestern states.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
August 15, 2014
While George W. Liebman offers an interesting viewpoint on Maryland's response to Central American children seeking refuge in our country ( "O'Malley takes on another 'pop' issue," Aug. 6), his opinions don't acknowledge the reality and immediacy of the needs of this population or Maryland's history of accepting those who have been marginalized in their home countries. At its founding, Maryland served as a safe haven for those fleeing religious persecution and has continued to welcome those from beyond its borders.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Dinner is fun when it feels like a mini-vacation. And that's exactly what dinner at Mi Comalito is. The new Charles North restaurant's menu spans several countries, from standard-issue Mexican dishes to specialties from El Salvador and Honduras. Thanks to the longtime popularity of Mexican food, Salvadoran and Honduran dishes are familiar enough to be comforting. But because the Central American cuisines aren't as ubiquitous as Mexican, they feel less run of the mill. Scene & Decor With warm yellow walls dotted with red accents and decorated with Salvadoran art, Mi Comalito's small space felt like a locals-only restaurant in a tiny Central American beach town.
NEWS
August 7, 2014
As a taxpayer, I have grown tired of politicians spending my money with no accountability. They pass spending bills without knowing how the money will be spent, and some of these politicians will add pork for their state without being questioned. My son is a school teacher raising three young children, and he does not earn enough money to spend $250 to $1,000 a day to support them. So why does our government think it is OK for our tax dollars to be spent on children illegally crossing our borders?
NEWS
July 14, 2014
Regarding the thousands of Central American children fleeing to our country, where are America's religious leaders ( "America's refugee crisis," July 9)? For too many Americans, our so-called "Judeo-Christian values" seem to always stop at race and the Rio Grande. With the notable exception of the Catholic Church and those religious-based organizations trying to bring some humanitarian sanity to the situation, religious leaders in this country are silent when they should be shouting "for shame" at our racism and xenophobia.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Hundreds of Marylanders are volunteering to help Central American children coming here as part of an influx of unaccompanied minors crossing the U.S. border in recent months, O'Malley administration officials said Tuesday. Anne Sheridan, director of the Governor's Office for Children, said the state has received an "extremely positive" response to a request for help posted on its website. Among other things, people are seeking information on how to become foster parents, provide clothing or tutoring, or offer legal or employment services.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
Commentator Jonathan David Farley writes that Central American children crossing our borders should be deported immediately ( "#Sendthemback," July 22). I have only written a response to an editorial once before, but I thought I needed to take it upon myself to respond. Being 13, I suppose most adults with Mr. Farley's mindset wouldn't think that a girl my age would know much about the topic or even really care about what's happening at all. But I will tell you this: I'm responding to your letter not to be hurtful or judgmental but only to offer an opposing view.
NEWS
August 15, 2014
While George W. Liebman offers an interesting viewpoint on Maryland's response to Central American children seeking refuge in our country ( "O'Malley takes on another 'pop' issue," Aug. 6), his opinions don't acknowledge the reality and immediacy of the needs of this population or Maryland's history of accepting those who have been marginalized in their home countries. At its founding, Maryland served as a safe haven for those fleeing religious persecution and has continued to welcome those from beyond its borders.
NEWS
By John Rivera and John Rivera,Staff Writer | May 18, 1993
LOS ANGELES -- Freshman City Councilman Mike Hernandez is tooling around in his Chevy Blazer through the streets of his district, the desperately poor but bustling Central American Pico-Union neighborhood.These streets, just west of downtown, still bear the scars of some of the worst of last year's rioting over the not-guilty verdicts in the first Rodney King beating trial. The busy streets are full of salsa music, the smell of warm tortillas and foot traffic -- an oddity in this auto-fixated city.
SPORTS
By Lowell E. Sunderland and Lowell E. Sunderland,SUN STAFF | April 21, 2000
Honduran players settled their strike over lack of pay -- apparently. Or, at least a team representing the tiny Central American country was officially reported yesterday as being in the air, with arrival in Hershey, Pa., last night. Which means, yes, the U.S. Olympic men's soccer team will open its quest for late-summer tickets to Sydney, Australia, with a game at 8 tonight in Hersheypark Stadium against Honduras. That game and a 5: 30 p.m. match between Guatemala and Panama are the curtain-raisers of a six-nation men's soccer tournament that ends April 30 and will decide which two national teams will represent North and Central America and the Caribbean among the 16 finalists in this year's Olympics.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 5, 2014
Hundreds of Marylanders are volunteering to help Central American children coming here as part of an influx of unaccompanied minors crossing the U.S. border in recent months, O'Malley administration officials said Tuesday. Anne Sheridan, director of the Governor's Office for Children, said the state has received an "extremely positive" response to a request for help posted on its website. Among other things, people are seeking information on how to become foster parents, provide clothing or tutoring, or offer legal or employment services.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
Commentator Jonathan David Farley writes that Central American children crossing our borders should be deported immediately ( "#Sendthemback," July 22). I have only written a response to an editorial once before, but I thought I needed to take it upon myself to respond. Being 13, I suppose most adults with Mr. Farley's mindset wouldn't think that a girl my age would know much about the topic or even really care about what's happening at all. But I will tell you this: I'm responding to your letter not to be hurtful or judgmental but only to offer an opposing view.
NEWS
July 14, 2014
Regarding the thousands of Central American children fleeing to our country, where are America's religious leaders ( "America's refugee crisis," July 9)? For too many Americans, our so-called "Judeo-Christian values" seem to always stop at race and the Rio Grande. With the notable exception of the Catholic Church and those religious-based organizations trying to bring some humanitarian sanity to the situation, religious leaders in this country are silent when they should be shouting "for shame" at our racism and xenophobia.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
— President Barack Obama asked Congress on Tuesday for $3.7 billion in emergency funding to address the influx of children from Central America entering the country illegally, a first step in what the White House described as a broader effort to speed deportations. The proposal — which includes $1.8 billion to provide shelter and medical care for children fleeing violence and poverty in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras — is likely to set off a more expansive debate on Capitol Hill about immigration, which lawmakers had put on hold ahead of this year's midterm elections.
NEWS
By Michael D. Barnes | July 8, 2014
A crisis of enormous economic and humanitarian impact is unfolding in Central America, and it's hard to find much mention of it in our national media, other than constant references to a result of the crisis: tens of thousands of human beings, many of them unaccompanied children, trying desperately to enter our country illegally. They are attempting to escape the poverty, gang violence and drug wars raging in their home countries, and they are flooding our border and overwhelming our immigration authorities.
TRAVEL
By Stephanie Citron, For The Baltimore Sun | February 12, 2014
Who knew that a man renowned for his progressive-minded accomplishments in advancing an educational institution would prefer to spend his leisure exploring underdeveloped lands and ancient civilizations? That, in a nutshell, describes Maryland Institute College of Art President Fred Lazarus. The Harvard graduate, widely acclaimed for launching Baltimore's once-local art college onto the world stage, is recognized as a leader in art and design education for more than three decades.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
In one of the largest gifts ever received by Baltimore's Walters Art Museum , a New Mexico collector is donating some 300 pieces and promising a $4 million bequest to shine a spotlight on the art of the ancient Americas. "This is a huge development for us," said Walters director Gary Vikan, noting that the soon-to-be-created center for the study of the arts of the ancient Americas should prove especially alluring to the area's "very vibrant" Latino community. "This is a huge new ingredient in building audience for us," he said.
NEWS
By John Fritze, The Baltimore Sun | July 8, 2014
— President Barack Obama asked Congress on Tuesday for $3.7 billion in emergency funding to address the influx of children from Central America entering the country illegally, a first step in what the White House described as a broader effort to speed deportations. The proposal — which includes $1.8 billion to provide shelter and medical care for children fleeing violence and poverty in El Salvador, Guatemala and Honduras — is likely to set off a more expansive debate on Capitol Hill about immigration, which lawmakers had put on hold ahead of this year's midterm elections.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Kit Waskom Pollard, For The Baltimore Sun | January 28, 2014
Dinner is fun when it feels like a mini-vacation. And that's exactly what dinner at Mi Comalito is. The new Charles North restaurant's menu spans several countries, from standard-issue Mexican dishes to specialties from El Salvador and Honduras. Thanks to the longtime popularity of Mexican food, Salvadoran and Honduran dishes are familiar enough to be comforting. But because the Central American cuisines aren't as ubiquitous as Mexican, they feel less run of the mill. Scene & Decor With warm yellow walls dotted with red accents and decorated with Salvadoran art, Mi Comalito's small space felt like a locals-only restaurant in a tiny Central American beach town.
ENTERTAINMENT
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2011
In one of the largest gifts ever received by Baltimore's Walters Art Museum , a New Mexico collector is donating some 300 pieces and promising a $4 million bequest to shine a spotlight on the art of the ancient Americas. "This is a huge development for us," said Walters director Gary Vikan, noting that the soon-to-be-created center for the study of the arts of the ancient Americas should prove especially alluring to the area's "very vibrant" Latino community. "This is a huge new ingredient in building audience for us," he said.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.