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By Michael D. Barnes | July 8, 2014
A crisis of enormous economic and humanitarian impact is unfolding in Central America, and it's hard to find much mention of it in our national media, other than constant references to a result of the crisis: tens of thousands of human beings, many of them unaccompanied children, trying desperately to enter our country illegally. They are attempting to escape the poverty, gang violence and drug wars raging in their home countries, and they are flooding our border and overwhelming our immigration authorities.
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NEWS
By Robert Blecker | October 3, 2014
The root cause of undocumented immigration, whether from Mexico or Central America, is the poverty and lack of economic opportunity that have afflicted those nations as a result of failed economic policies - including their trade agreements with the United States. Those thousands of migrants - including unaccompanied minors - arriving at our border are not criminals trying to break the law. They are a warning sign that the collateral damage of so-called "free trade" agreements cannot always be found in closed factories and shuttered Main Street businesses in the United States.
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NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
With just $40 in his pocket and the killing of two friends fresh in his mind, 13-year-old Leonardo Enrique Navas set off from El Salvador in July and traveled alone for 15 days on buses and taxis until he crossed the border into Texas. Every few days, he said, he called his mother in Maryland. That was the first part of his American journey. When school opens Tuesday, he will have his first day in a U.S. seventh-grade classroom, at Bates Middle School in Annapolis, after being reunited with a mother he had not seen for seven years.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser and The Baltimore Sun | September 17, 2014
Maryland officials said Wednesday that most of the more than 2,800 immigrant children who have come to the state from Central America this year have been resettled with family members. Fewer than 50 are housed in a group setting at any one time, said Human Resources Secretary Ted Dallas, and only for less than a month while awaiting placement in a private home. He said the facility is in Baltimore County but declined to say where. Dallas said the children have shown themselves to be resilient in the face of the problems of their homelands and the arduous journeys that brought them to the nation's southern border.
FEATURES
By Chris Kaltenbach, The Baltimore Sun | June 24, 2012
Owings Mills ophthalmologist Marc Honig and his son, Evan, could have simply donated some money to help the disadvantaged in Honduras. They could have collected some old eyeglasses, or solicited their colleagues and fellow students for help, or tried to convince big corporations to hand over cash and equipment. In fact, they've done all of that — and more. This weekend, the Honigs are beginning a week-long stay at a makeshift medical clinic in a small Honduran village. They and some 40 other doctors and students will volunteer their time, screening and treating thousands of villagers from the surrounding area, bringing healing to a corner of the world desperately in need.
NEWS
By Christopher C. Schons | May 29, 2005
WASHINGTON - Congress must ratify the pending Central American Free Trade Agreement for one reason: national security. While much of our country's attention has been focused on Iraq, a series of troubling events, political and otherwise, have occurred in South America: Argentina has suffered economic collapse and, despite a recent recovery, remains a financial pariah. In oil-rich Venezuela, the erratic and autocratic President Hugo Chavez - in league with Fidel Castro of Cuba - has consolidated his power over his own dismayed population and extended his overtly anti-U.
NEWS
July 18, 1995
The Howard County Friends of Central America and the Caribbean will sponsor a meeting and potluck dinner at 7 p.m. Friday at Wilde Lake Interfaith Center.The meeting will focus on the use of child labor in Central America for the benefit of the United States garment industry.Speakers include Judith Yanira Viera of El Salvador; Claudia Leticia Molina of Honduras, and Charles Kernaghan, executive director of the National Labor Committee in Central America.The labor committee is sponsoring a national tour by Ms. Viera and Ms. Molina.
FEATURES
By Winifred Walsh and Winifred Walsh,Evening Sun Staff | August 8, 1991
WOMEN caught up in the horrors of police terrorism in Central America tell their stories of missing loved ones in a series of powerful monologues delivered with anguished eloquence in a new theater piece created especially for Diverse Works, Maryland Art Place's annual performing arts program."
NEWS
March 15, 1999
THE MOST important thing the United States can do now for the little states of Central America is provide the nearly $1 billion in emergency aid that President Clinton asked of Congress. And the most important part of the aid is its substantial forgiveness of Nicaraguan and Honduran debts and its two years of grace for other repayments.President Clinton's swing through Central America, meeting its leaders in one room, heralds a new relationship. Before, the CIA was heavily involved in right-wing and brutal regimes that went beyond legitimate suppression of Communist-influenced insurgent movements in Guatemala and El Salvador.
NEWS
May 8, 1997
AT THE same time the U.S. was winning the Cold War with the Soviet Union less than a decade ago, it was on its way to victory in the hot ideological civil wars then roiling Central America. President Clinton's visit to the region this week is a celebration of comparative peace, incipient democracy and free-market economic reform.Although he can hardly be expected to pay tribute to Ronald Reagan's interventionism lest he offend his hosts and remind his countrymen of unsavory events, Mr. Clinton is the beneficiary of Mr. Reagan's policies.
BUSINESS
By Arthur Hirsch and The Baltimore Sun | September 12, 2014
Southwest Airlines hopes to add Central America to its list of destinations with daily round trip service from Baltimore Washington International Thurgood Marshall Airport to Costa Rica starting in early March, the airline announced Friday. The Dallas-based carrier, which is BWI's largest, has applied for permission from the U.S. Department of Transportation to add the flights to Juan Santamaria International Airport in San Jose, Costa Rica. With its many national parks and nature sanctuaries, the country is known for having pioneered ecotourism, and is the most visited Central American country, according to the World Tourism Organization.
NEWS
September 11, 2014
While legal American workers obey our laws, pay their taxes and try to provide a decent life for their families, an endless line of illegal immigrants from Central America and Mexico continues to pass through our unsecured border to endanger our economy and security. These undocumented immigrants take advantage of our health care system, overcrowd our public schools and demand services they have not earned and do not deserve. They also bring diseases with them that are endangering our well being.
NEWS
August 26, 2014
Regarding your editorial about unaccompanied children from Central America illegally crossing our borders, what's wrong with them stopping and settling in Mexico? ( "Death by deportation," Aug. 24). Central and South Americans (and there are lots of them) are passing through Mexico anyway to get up here and they already speak Spanish in Mexico, so why don't they remain there instead continuing on to the U.S.? Mexico is a big country and not completely crime-ridden by any means.
NEWS
August 24, 2014
At least five undocumented immigrants U.S. officials recently deported back to their homes in Honduras turned up dead at the morgue in San Pedro Sula, the Los Angeles Times reported . According to other news accounts, the victims ranged in age from 12 to 18, and all five had died of gunshot wounds. The director of the morgue speculated the killings were the work of criminal gangs in retribution for the children's refusal to become members or pay protection money to the thugs who terrorized their neighborhood.
NEWS
By Liz Bowie, The Baltimore Sun | August 24, 2014
With just $40 in his pocket and the killing of two friends fresh in his mind, 13-year-old Leonardo Enrique Navas set off from El Salvador in July and traveled alone for 15 days on buses and taxis until he crossed the border into Texas. Every few days, he said, he called his mother in Maryland. That was the first part of his American journey. When school opens Tuesday, he will have his first day in a U.S. seventh-grade classroom, at Bates Middle School in Annapolis, after being reunited with a mother he had not seen for seven years.
NEWS
August 8, 2014
Del. A. Wade Kach, who is running for Baltimore County Council, is opposed to the plan to house 50 kids from Central America in Timonium. Where is his Christian compassion? Where is the Christian compassion of the officials and residents of Baltimore City, Carroll County, etc.? Oh, the hate on their faces and their messages. Mr. Kach says it's a "federal problem. " Well, the Senate passed an immigration bill and the House has not. A federal problem for sure? A Republican problem!
NEWS
February 9, 1996
IN HIS week-long trip to three Central American countries and Venezuela, Pope John Paul II has returned to a region that has changed markedly since his last visit in 1983. Except for Guatemala, which remains in the throes of a decades-long civil war, Latin America have seen a waning of armed violence, but a rise in religious divisions.For Catholics, the divisions are the legacy of the often-bitter struggle to implement the church's ideal of supporting the poor. Since the Second Vatican Council 30 years ago, Catholic theologians, clerics and lay people have attempted to transform the council's "preferential option for the poor" from words into reality.
NEWS
February 24, 1991
Mexico City--IT'S AS IF THE SCRIPT writers for Central America and Panama had run out of ideas.Priest killings, peasant massacres, war-maimed children, starvation, raped and tortured nuns, thousands of refugees, the "Just Cause" invasion of Panama, Manuel Noriega's red underwear.Even a rebel death squad for Salvadoran cows.American TV viewers have become so inured to the grotesque on the Central American Channel that that they have reached for the remote control and pressed the mute button.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | August 7, 2014
Gov. Martin O'Malley joined U.S. Labor Secretary Thomas E. Perez at a popular burrito restaurant in this Washington suburb Thursday to praise its higher-than-minimum wages and to call for a pay raise for other American workers. The event at Boloco gave O'Malley an opportunity to lend public support to a top priority of President Obama at a time when the governor has been at odds with the administration over how to shelter immigrant children from Central America. Appearing with Perez, Montgomery County Executive Isiah "Ike" Leggett and Boloco chief executive Patrick Renna, O'Malley said the 22-restaurant chain does well by treating its employees well.
NEWS
August 1, 2014
Whether the migrant unaccompanied children surging over our southern border are refugees, illegal migrants or whatever, they need to be cared for in a humane manner. However, this situation coupled with the push to legalize millions of folks illegally residing in America is the "perfect storm. " Many who have followed the illegal immigration problem for years have warned that the system was broken. We expressed concern that if the laws continued to be violated, serious problems would take place.
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