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FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | August 24, 1996
It's time for the annual physics lesson, so get out pencil and paper, there'll be a quiz later. (Just kidding!)Dealing with summer heat is an issue for everyone, not just those who lack central air conditioning. If you don't have central air, there are lots of ways to make yourself more comfortable in the house -- sometimes by using features designed by Colonial or Victorian builders for exactly that. And if you do have central air, there are ways to make the system work more efficiently and save energy costs.
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BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | June 17, 2001
Hot enough for you? Air-conditioning season is upon us. If you're lucky enough to have air conditioning, you've probably turned it on for at least a while during the past week. The phones are ringing off the hook at HVAC contractors' offices as sweaty, disappointed people find that their air conditioners stopped working over the winter. What can you do to keep from joining the ranks of those poor souls? Regular maintenance will help the equipment operate more efficiently and dependably.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | July 19, 1998
SUMMER HAS produced enough hot, muggy weather so far to remind us of why we hate it. If your dwelling doesn't have central air conditioning, you have particular reason for dreading the heat of July, August and -- in this part of the country, at least -- September.However, even if you don't have central air, there are some things you can do to keep your house cooler and yourself more comfortable. Every year we at Home Work offer some suggestions for mitigating the heat. Here are a few of them:Keep heat from building up in the first place.
NEWS
June 28, 1998
IT SOUNDS pretty incredible now. But just decades ago, Baltimoreans routinely beat the summer heat by sleeping outside in the comparative coolness of public parks. Whole families felt safe doing so, escaping their sweltering rowhouses with cots and linens.Home air conditioners have been common in Maryland for about 40 years -- enough time to lose many traditions of keeping cool. Local amusement parks and once plentiful Chesapeake Bay beach resorts are long gone. So are sleeping porches and colorful awnings that kept the sun from scorching living spaces.
NEWS
July 8, 2010
I attended the Reservoir Hill Improvement Council community meeting at the J.E. Howard Recreation Center this past Tuesday and although the discussion was heated, I felt a chill in the air, almost to the point of shivering. I had a long sleeve top on and the temperature had reached a sweltering 105 degrees so I thought maybe I wasn't used to air conditioning. On my way out I noticed that the thermostat was set at 68 degrees, which is what I set my thermostat on when I am home. Then I realized I don't have central air in my house and the minimum temperature recommended for air conditioning is 78 degrees.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2012
A brick Colonial in Monkton set on 160 acres with an historic stone guest house sold for $3.1 million in June. The nearly 7,000-square-foot main house, built in the 1970s but renovated over the years, has four bedrooms, 51/2 baths, five fireplaces, a four-person sleeping porch, a paneled breakfast room, a swimming pool and a five-car garage. "They did it right when they built it in the 1970s," said Susan Knott, of O'Conor & Mooney Realtors in Lutherville, who was the selling agent for a house that she also owned.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | August 22, 1998
IT WAS ONE of those anxiety-ridden moments that seem to fill a homeowner's life. I was up on the roof of my house with a repairman waiting for our 20-year-old air conditioner to click on.A few nights earlier I had awakened with sweat rolling off my body. The perspiration was a clue that something was wrong with our home's central air conditioning system. After suffering through several fitful days and nights, I had summoned the repairman.Now I was waiting to see if his preliminary procedures -- cleaning the coil and replacing a switch -- would be sufficient.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | June 4, 2006
With the return of hot weather, and with electricity rates set to jump sharply this summer, Marylanders are becoming painfully aware of how expensive it will be to cool their homes from now on. If their old central air-conditioning systems have been limping for years, many are likely to be ogling the new, high-efficiency systems that promise to cool their homes with up to 30 percent less electricity. Not so fast. Industry experts say the new, more-efficient models mandated by the federal government since January might indeed deliver the promised energy savings.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | June 15, 1991
It's 98 degrees and you don't have air conditioning. Summer has begun. Are you doomed to swelter?Not necessarily.There are a lot of reasons why owners of older houses haven't succumbed to the lure of central air conditioning. Central air systems require one set of ductwork to deliver cold air and another set to capture hot air for recooling. Even if you already have forced-air heat, you may still need an air return system. For the most efficient cooling, you need air returns at the highest possible point on every floor.
FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | June 6, 1998
AIR conditioners drip. This is one of the verities of life. A goal of every right-thinking, air-conditioned American should be to avoid getting dripped on.I grappled with these heavy philosophical concepts recently as I installed a heavy, window-unit air conditioner in our home.Air conditioners remove moisture from the air. This is good. Especially in Baltimore, where "taking in the summer air" often feels like trying to breath through a warm wash cloth that has been plastered to your face.
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