Advertisement
HomeCollectionsCentral Air
IN THE NEWS

Central Air

FEATURES
By Rob Kasper | June 6, 1998
AIR conditioners drip. This is one of the verities of life. A goal of every right-thinking, air-conditioned American should be to avoid getting dripped on.I grappled with these heavy philosophical concepts recently as I installed a heavy, window-unit air conditioner in our home.Air conditioners remove moisture from the air. This is good. Especially in Baltimore, where "taking in the summer air" often feels like trying to breath through a warm wash cloth that has been plastered to your face.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | June 17, 2001
Hot enough for you? Air-conditioning season is upon us. If you're lucky enough to have air conditioning, you've probably turned it on for at least a while during the past week. The phones are ringing off the hook at HVAC contractors' offices as sweaty, disappointed people find that their air conditioners stopped working over the winter. What can you do to keep from joining the ranks of those poor souls? Regular maintenance will help the equipment operate more efficiently and dependably.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2012
State Comptroller Peter Franchot plans to post an online petition on his agency's web site Thursday to help Baltimore County parents put pressure on the county school administration to take action to put air-conditioning into schools that now offer no relief to sweltering students. Franchot vowed to post the "Cool Schools" petition after hearing a presentation Wednesday  from the school administration on school construction priorities during the annual Board of Public Works ritual that Gov. Martin O'Malley calls the "Hope-a-Thon" but that virtually everyone else knows as the "Beg-a-Thon.
NEWS
June 28, 1998
IT SOUNDS pretty incredible now. But just decades ago, Baltimoreans routinely beat the summer heat by sleeping outside in the comparative coolness of public parks. Whole families felt safe doing so, escaping their sweltering rowhouses with cots and linens.Home air conditioners have been common in Maryland for about 40 years -- enough time to lose many traditions of keeping cool. Local amusement parks and once plentiful Chesapeake Bay beach resorts are long gone. So are sleeping porches and colorful awnings that kept the sun from scorching living spaces.
NEWS
July 8, 2010
I attended the Reservoir Hill Improvement Council community meeting at the J.E. Howard Recreation Center this past Tuesday and although the discussion was heated, I felt a chill in the air, almost to the point of shivering. I had a long sleeve top on and the temperature had reached a sweltering 105 degrees so I thought maybe I wasn't used to air conditioning. On my way out I noticed that the thermostat was set at 68 degrees, which is what I set my thermostat on when I am home. Then I realized I don't have central air in my house and the minimum temperature recommended for air conditioning is 78 degrees.
NEWS
By Lorraine Mirabella, The Baltimore Sun | September 8, 2012
A brick Colonial in Monkton set on 160 acres with an historic stone guest house sold for $3.1 million in June. The nearly 7,000-square-foot main house, built in the 1970s but renovated over the years, has four bedrooms, 51/2 baths, five fireplaces, a four-person sleeping porch, a paneled breakfast room, a swimming pool and a five-car garage. "They did it right when they built it in the 1970s," said Susan Knott, of O'Conor & Mooney Realtors in Lutherville, who was the selling agent for a house that she also owned.
NEWS
By ROBERT BURRUSS | July 2, 1991
Kensington -- When I was young and wanted to be a writer of short stories -- which was right after I wanted to be an actor and movie director -- I wrote a story about a small town that was situated in a valley surrounded by high mountains.In my story, the surrounding mountains would sometimes trap the air so that the summer temperatures would get uncomfortably high. But that had historically been one of the unique features of the town, and people accepted it. The high humidity on the trapped-air days was also a historical phenomenon -- probably the product of extra respiration of the trees in the town and on the lower slopes of the mountains.
FEATURES
By ROB KASPER | August 22, 1998
IT WAS ONE of those anxiety-ridden moments that seem to fill a homeowner's life. I was up on the roof of my house with a repairman waiting for our 20-year-old air conditioner to click on.A few nights earlier I had awakened with sweat rolling off my body. The perspiration was a clue that something was wrong with our home's central air conditioning system. After suffering through several fitful days and nights, I had summoned the repairman.Now I was waiting to see if his preliminary procedures -- cleaning the coil and replacing a switch -- would be sufficient.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | June 15, 1991
It's 98 degrees and you don't have air conditioning. Summer has begun. Are you doomed to swelter?Not necessarily.There are a lot of reasons why owners of older houses haven't succumbed to the lure of central air conditioning. Central air systems require one set of ductwork to deliver cold air and another set to capture hot air for recooling. Even if you already have forced-air heat, you may still need an air return system. For the most efficient cooling, you need air returns at the highest possible point on every floor.
FEATURES
By James Dulley and James Dulley,Contributing Writer | June 5, 1993
Q: My central air conditioner is getting older, but I can't afford a new one. What simple maintenance and improvements can I make to cut my electric bills?A: A simple do-it-yourself maintenance checkup can keep your electric bills as low as possible and avoid unnecessary repair calls. You can also make some simple improvements to your air conditioner to make it more efficient and improve the summertime comfort in your home. First, shut off the electricity to the air conditioner at the circuit breaker or fuse box. Go outdoors and remove the sheet-metal housing.
Baltimore Sun Articles
|
|
|
Please note the green-lined linked article text has been applied commercially without any involvement from our newsroom editors, reporters or any other editorial staff.