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By Tribune News Service | March 12, 1992
ORLANDO, Fla. -- Room air conditioners appear to be less effective than central air in keeping harmful mold and bacteria from getting into homes and causing breathing problems in people with asthma or allergies.University of Michigan researchers who studied 12 homes with either type of air conditioners found that higher levels of mold and bacteria were found in homes that had only room air conditioners.The levels of the mold and bacteria found in these homes were comparable to the levels that would be expected in homes with no air conditioning, lead researcher Harriet A. Burge reported Tuesday at the American Academy of Allergy and Immunology annual meeting.
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NEWS
August 20, 2013
I enjoyed Mike McGrew's article regarding the Millennials ( "What's a parent to do with a Millennial?" Aug. 12). I grew up in the 1940s and '50s, and we did not have central heat, central air, television, computers or indoor plumbing. But guess what? I survived! Today's kids have too many material comforts and want more. And who gives it all to them? Their doting parents. Right on, Mr. McGrew! Ruth Lashley, Elkton
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By Mary Gail Hare and Mary Gail Hare,Sun Staff Writer | June 27, 1994
Central air conditioning will cool the Sykesville Town House in about 30 days.An energy-efficient system will replace the aging and noisy window air conditioners that are scattered throughout the building."
NEWS
By Childs Walker, The Baltimore Sun | July 6, 2012
After a week without electricity, Sara Waire felt little need to sugarcoat her answer when asked Friday afternoon how her family was holding up. "Today," the Stoneleigh resident said grimly, "has been pretty awful. " Her 4-year-old daughter, Mady, bounced on and off of a couch as she watched cartoons on a small generator-powered DVD player. Her 2-year-old son, Liam, crouched underneath the dining room table, pecking away at a game on his mother's iPhone. "It took them a couple of days to go crazy," Waire said as she warned Mady not to be rude.
NEWS
By Stacey Hirsh and Stacey Hirsh,SUN STAFF | November 20, 2000
Steve Smith walked into a gray, barren concrete building more than three decades ago, inexperienced in business and new to the air-conditioning industry - but youthful enthusiasm had gotten the best of him. He filled the gray building in Columbia's Oakland Ridge Industrial Park with equipment, hired workers, put two new trucks in the parking lot and, in 1968, watched his business grow. Today, Central Air Conditioning Contractors Inc. is a $15 million business with 150 employees, more than 60 service vans and nearly 2,000 customers, Smith said.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | May 2, 1999
IF YOU LIVE in a part of the country where spring is about 10 minutes long, and then summer comes roaring in, you may already have started thinking about the approaching air conditioning season.If you live in an old house, you may also already know that retrofitting can be a problem.However, you do have a number of options.The easiest solution is to simply install window units. The advantage is that they are economical to use: You cool only the room you want, and only when you want it.The disadvantages are that they are unsightly from the outside, and hard to seal against the weather so they usually need to be removed and reinstalled each season.
NEWS
August 20, 2013
I enjoyed Mike McGrew's article regarding the Millennials ( "What's a parent to do with a Millennial?" Aug. 12). I grew up in the 1940s and '50s, and we did not have central heat, central air, television, computers or indoor plumbing. But guess what? I survived! Today's kids have too many material comforts and want more. And who gives it all to them? Their doting parents. Right on, Mr. McGrew! Ruth Lashley, Elkton
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2003
When Stephen Smith Sr.'s Central Air Conditioning Contractors Inc. of Columbia was acquired by national building services company Encompass Services Corp. in 1998, it seemed another locally headquartered company had disappeared. But with Encompass' November filing for bankruptcy reorganization, which has forced the giant to shed much of its business, a new company - formed by Stephen Smith Jr. - has emerged to dig into some of what the Houston-based corporation is leaving behind locally.
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | June 8, 1996
Owners of old houses know the sometimes intriguing, sometimes agonizing truth: There's no such thing as a "simple" project. Repairing a bathroom tile can lead to ripping out a wall, replacing a sink and redoing the floor. Enlarging a window can lead to the discovery there's no header, so the joists of the floor above are not adequately supported, which means that the wall has to be rebuilt Sometimes it's a question of deciding just how broke something has to be before you really need to fix it.That's the case for a reader in Baltimore County, who sent an e-mail letter: "I live in an old house (1906)
FEATURES
By Karol V. Menzie and Randy Johnson | August 24, 1996
It's time for the annual physics lesson, so get out pencil and paper, there'll be a quiz later. (Just kidding!)Dealing with summer heat is an issue for everyone, not just those who lack central air conditioning. If you don't have central air, there are lots of ways to make yourself more comfortable in the house -- sometimes by using features designed by Colonial or Victorian builders for exactly that. And if you do have central air, there are ways to make the system work more efficiently and save energy costs.
NEWS
By Michael Dresser, The Baltimore Sun | January 25, 2012
State Comptroller Peter Franchot plans to post an online petition on his agency's web site Thursday to help Baltimore County parents put pressure on the county school administration to take action to put air-conditioning into schools that now offer no relief to sweltering students. Franchot vowed to post the "Cool Schools" petition after hearing a presentation Wednesday  from the school administration on school construction priorities during the annual Board of Public Works ritual that Gov. Martin O'Malley calls the "Hope-a-Thon" but that virtually everyone else knows as the "Beg-a-Thon.
NEWS
July 8, 2010
I attended the Reservoir Hill Improvement Council community meeting at the J.E. Howard Recreation Center this past Tuesday and although the discussion was heated, I felt a chill in the air, almost to the point of shivering. I had a long sleeve top on and the temperature had reached a sweltering 105 degrees so I thought maybe I wasn't used to air conditioning. On my way out I noticed that the thermostat was set at 68 degrees, which is what I set my thermostat on when I am home. Then I realized I don't have central air in my house and the minimum temperature recommended for air conditioning is 78 degrees.
NEWS
By DAVID ZURAWIK and DAVID ZURAWIK,SUN TELEVISION CRITIC | July 9, 2006
Comedian Dave Chappelle is one of pop culture's most intriguing enigmas. In 2005, his Comedy Central show was a hit, he had a new $50 million contract for a third season and sales of his DVD were setting records. Then just a few weeks into production on a planned third season, he bolted for South Africa without explanation. Chappelle's Show: The Lost Episodes, which begins airing tonight at 9 on Comedy Central, is the product of what the medium's most daring comedian left behind. Cobbled together from sketches that were taped in April 2005 during the days that preceded his departure, the "lost" episodes are littered with shards of pain and flashes of anger and ultimately leave viewers feeling empty and flat.
NEWS
By FRANK D. ROYLANCE and FRANK D. ROYLANCE,SUN REPORTER | June 4, 2006
With the return of hot weather, and with electricity rates set to jump sharply this summer, Marylanders are becoming painfully aware of how expensive it will be to cool their homes from now on. If their old central air-conditioning systems have been limping for years, many are likely to be ogling the new, high-efficiency systems that promise to cool their homes with up to 30 percent less electricity. Not so fast. Industry experts say the new, more-efficient models mandated by the federal government since January might indeed deliver the promised energy savings.
BUSINESS
By Gregory Karp | July 24, 2005
Many parts of the country have endured brutally hot weather in recent days, and more is likely on the way as August approaches. It's important to stay cool at home, but consumers are wasting a lot of money because of misconceptions about how to do it properly. The money involved could be significant. The average U.S. household spends more than $200 a year on cooling, while hotter regions could be paying double that, according to the Alliance to Save Energy. Here are some myths that may be costing you money: Fans cool the house.
NEWS
By TaNoah Morgan and TaNoah Morgan,SUN STAFF | May 19, 2003
When Stephen Smith Sr.'s Central Air Conditioning Contractors Inc. of Columbia was acquired by national building services company Encompass Services Corp. in 1998, it seemed another locally headquartered company had disappeared. But with Encompass' November filing for bankruptcy reorganization, which has forced the giant to shed much of its business, a new company - formed by Stephen Smith Jr. - has emerged to dig into some of what the Houston-based corporation is leaving behind locally.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | June 17, 2001
Hot enough for you? Air-conditioning season is upon us. If you're lucky enough to have air conditioning, you've probably turned it on for at least a while during the past week. The phones are ringing off the hook at HVAC contractors' offices as sweaty, disappointed people find that their air conditioners stopped working over the winter. What can you do to keep from joining the ranks of those poor souls? Regular maintenance will help the equipment operate more efficiently and dependably.
BUSINESS
By Karol V. Menzie and Ron Nodine | July 19, 1998
SUMMER HAS produced enough hot, muggy weather so far to remind us of why we hate it. If your dwelling doesn't have central air conditioning, you have particular reason for dreading the heat of July, August and -- in this part of the country, at least -- September.However, even if you don't have central air, there are some things you can do to keep your house cooler and yourself more comfortable. Every year we at Home Work offer some suggestions for mitigating the heat. Here are a few of them:Keep heat from building up in the first place.
BUSINESS
By Dean Uhler | May 19, 2002
Bob and Sue Locke are planning to have central air conditioning installed in their 55-year-old Cape Cod home. It will be a single-zone system, with the air handler situated in the attic. Their question is whether the central air installation will require them to have their electrical service upgraded. The heating and air-conditioning contractors from whom they've gotten estimates have differing opinions. Their house has gas heat, a gas range, a gas clothes dryer and a gas-fired water heater.
BUSINESS
By Meredith Cohn and Meredith Cohn,SUN STAFF | July 11, 2001
Constellation Energy Source announced yesterday that it has signed a 20-year agreement with the Rouse Co. to build and operate a central air-conditioning plant at Rouse's premier Fashion Show mall in Las Vegas. It will be the second such system to be built and owned by Constellation, a subsidiary of Constellation Energy Group. The company announced last year its selection by the Pittsburgh Steelers to build and own a heating and air-conditioning plant for their new stadium. Constellation will build and own the mall air-conditioning system and lease it to Rouse.
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